Archives for posts with tag: disabled people

“Conference, delegates, friends. I know I speak for the whole Disabled Members Group, and for disabled people up and down the country, when I say we are deeply grateful for the overwhelming support shown by so many branches, members and elected representatives for this resolution.

When the UK signed up to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons With Disabilities in 2009, Labour were in government, and although disabled people were already dying from Blair’s reforms, the full weight of these seemingly disparate deaths wasn’t yet understood.

A year later, when the Coalition took office, we know that they had already received a Coroner’s Report on the Prevention of Future Deaths, which would save lives if implemented. Iain Duncan Smith and Chris Grayling decided to ignore it, and the Tory/LibDem Coalition dedicated their time in government to implementing sweeping, devastating cuts to social security, health and social care – a programme which continues to cut further and deeper with every passing year.

In 2012, Disabled People Against Cuts began the formal process of triggering a UN investigation into violations of the CRPD. This was based not just on the lives lost, but on the multitude of ways the Austerity cuts have made life harder for disabled people. We have been pushing for a cumulative impact study for years, because disabled people are rarely affected by just one cut.

It takes a long time to initiate an investigation, as multiple sources of evidence have to be submitted, verified and researched. In 2014, the UK became the first government to ever be investigated by the CRPD, a shameful mark on our history. No UN investigation is undertaken frivolously – t

 

Source: My Speech on the UNCRPD Judgement at the SNP Conference-Fiona Robertson – Black Triangle Campaign

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Some taxi services in Wales are refusing to pick up passengers who use wheelchairs or assistance dogs, a campaign group has claimed. Disability Wales said

Source: Disabled people ‘humiliated’ by taxi refusals | DisabledGo News and Blog


I’m constantly anxious that my ‘luck’ will run out. Either in being able to work at all, or that my workplace will run out of patience and I’ll be out of a job,” says Rebecca Allen, a data analyst in London. Allen, 30, has hypermobility syndrome – a connective tissue disease causing lax joints and muscle fibres – as well as fibromyalgia, and gut and lung problems. Every day at work, she’s fatigued and in pain – even a tough commute can mean she’s unable to make it through the working day. But because her disability is hidden – that is, a disability that isn’t immediately apparent – she doesn’t necessarily appear disabled to her employers and colleagues. It means she’s had colleagues in previous workplaces make pointed glances at the clock when she’s had to come in later because of her health, as well as derogatory comments about her commitment to the job. “I’ve found there’s a total lack of understanding in the workplace, as in the wider world, of what a hidden disability is, whether it’s

Source: Hidden disabilities at work: ‘Every day I’m fatigued and in pain’ | DisabledGo News and Blog


Disabled people need to apply for 60 per cent more jobs than non-disabled jobseekers before they find work, new research shows. An Opinium survey of 2,000

Source: Disabled people have to apply for 60% more jobs than non-disabled people before finding one | DisabledGo News and Blog


This Call for Evidence looks to support the Government’s commitment to ensure the electoral system is accessible for all electors.

Responses to the Call for Evidence will:

  • enhance the Government’s understanding of the experiences of disabled people in registering to vote and casting their vote.
  • help identify if current mechanisms to support disabled people to participate in the democratic process are sufficient; and
  • identify examples of good practice provided by Electoral Service Teams to disabled people at elections.

The Cabinet Office is seeking comments by 17:00 Tuesday 14 November 2017.

A report of key findings and recommendations will be produced in partnership with the Cabinet Office chaired Accessibility of Elections Group. This will be published in Spring 2018.

This Call for Evidence will be of particular interest to:

  • Disabled people;
  • Those who support disabled people to register to vote and/or vote;
  • Individuals, organisations and stakeholders who work with and also represent the interests of disabled people;
  • Healthcare and social care professionals and providers;
  • Electoral administrators and electoral stakeholders.

Call for Evidence

 

Source: *Call for Evidence: access to elections – GOV.UK

 

*Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.


John Pring Disability News Service 14th September 2017

About 900,000 disabled people will see their weekly incomes fall by at least £50 a week by 2020, because of the continuing impact of the government’s welfare reforms, according to new research.

The research by the consultancy Policy in Practice found that, of 7.2 million working-age, low-income households, more than two-fifths of those containing a working-age disabled person would lose at least £50 a week, compared with November 2016.

The report, The Cumulative Impact Of Welfare Reform: A National Picture, says the impact of measures introduced after November 2016 will see the average low-income household containing a working-age disabled person lose £51.47 a week by 2020, compared with an average loss of £35.82 for households not containing a disabled person.

This will come on top of an average weekly loss of more than £20 for low-income households containing a working-age disabled person as a result of welfare reforms introduced pre-November 2016 – such as the benefit cap, cuts to housing benefit and the bedroom tax – although this figure does not take account of rising living costs.

 

Source: Welfare reform ‘will see £50 a week more cuts to 900,000 disabled people’ – Black Triangle Campaign


A leading social care group has warned that any predicted increases in NHS pay must be matched by better funding for the independent care sector to avoid a

Source: Better funding for social care needed now to avoid staffing crisis | Care Industry News


A woman’s experience on a packed London bus serves as a case-in-point for the reality of life for a disabled person in the UK. And the story, in which a bus driver allegedly said “fucking disabled people shouldn’t be allowed on any bus”, is a testament to just how Conservative-led governments have pushed disabled people’s rights backwards.

A prominent campaigner

Paula Peters is a prominent campaigner and member of the Disabled People Against Cuts (DPAC) Steer Group. She is well known for her activism and fighting for disabled people’s rights. But on 16 August, she was subject to what she calls “abuse” and discrimination on the R3 bus to Orpington in Bromley, Greater London. And she took to Facebook to tell the story.

Peters lives with Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS), Postural tachycardia syndrome (PoTS), Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and mental health issues, including anxiety and depression. She has to walk with a tri-rollator, on her doctor’s advice, due to the discomfort, pain, and balance issues caused by her conditions. But on the morning of 16 August, neither the bus driver for private operator Metrobus nor the passengers in question took any of this into account.

Source: One woman’s experience on a London bus shows the damage the Tories have done to disabled people | The Canary


Unfortunately until the Government change their attitude towards disability there will never be an opportunity for a change for the better with the public at large , it will even be difficult to maintain the current position so a change for the worse is more likely.

While not actually saying it the Government are indicating that disabled people do not require welfare benefits and even if they do this should be for a limited period to enable them to overcome their disabilities. This could be where the Paralympics comes in for, although, this would not be the intention, the Government (DWP) appear to believe that these Paralympians do not now need benefits and if this is so for them, then it should be so for all other receivers of benefits. This is in fact not correct for it is only because they receive benefits, that they can continue to do the sports they do. without the benefits their participation in sports will eventually be decreasing until they can no longer engage in sports and then they will be back to square one.

The mainstream media go some way to make public this belief and therefore the general public think this is so for every benefit claimant, if one person can overcome their disability then so can all, so those who continue to claim benefits can only be scroungers.

Having a complex needs daughter I am well aware that she will never overcome her disability and will in effect become more disabled with the advent of time, as will many if not all others who have disabilities.

So the starting point is with the Government of the day, but unfortunately all they are contend with is making cuts, on cuts and more cuts, so eventually the number of disabled people will decrease, but only because the Government is making it impossible for them to survive.

Scope's Blog

Following our #SportForAll activity this summer and as we head towards the fifth anniversary of the London 2012 Paralympic Games. We’ve discovered that, despite the success of the games themselves, there has been little change in the way disabled people feel they are treated by society and supported by the government.

The London 2012 Paralympic Games ran between 29 August and 9 September. At the time it was Lord Coe’s view that “we would never think of disability in the same way again.”

The Games themselves saw disability given an unprecedented platform, with Paralympics GB taking home 120 medals, and para-athletes like Sarah Storey and Ellie Simmonds becoming household names.

However, our new research reveals that a quarter (28%) of disabled people did not feel the Paralympics delivered a positive legacy for disabled people once the two weeks were over. Over a third (38%) think that attitudes have not improved…

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The government has been accused of “sending out mixed messages” on independent living, after it emerged that it wants to charge VAT on the payroll services provided to disabled people who receive direct payments for their social care.

Cheshire Centre for Independent Living (CCIL) is having to take HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) to the first-tier tribunal to fight off its attempt to force it to charge disabled service-users 20 per cent VAT on top of their monthly fee for using its popular payroll service.

The tribunal case is due to be heard in Manchester in early December.

Other disabled people’s organisations are also challenging the HMRC VAT demand on their own payroll services, but CCIL’s will be the first to be heard at tribunal.

CCIL insists that its payroll service – which is used by nearly 3,000 disabled people across the north-west of England who use direct payments to employ personal assistants – should not be subject to VAT under HMRC’s “welfare” exemption.

It has been trying to persuade HMRC to withdraw its claim for more than four years, but the government refused even to take the dispute to a mediation service.

Tom Hendrie, CCIL’s head of policy and communications, said the imposition of VAT on payroll services was “absolutely not right”, but he said HMRC had refused to see it as qualifying for an exemption and had “really dug their heels in about it”

 

Source: Government’s VAT attack ‘sends out mixed messages on independent living’ – Black Triangle Campaign

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