Parties accused of ‘neglecting’ disabled people after politicians fail to show up for welfare debate : Welfare Weekly


Disability Rights UK: “Such a stance is dangerously neglectful.”

Source: Parties accused of ‘neglecting’ disabled people after politicians fail to show up for welfare debate : Welfare Weekly

Closure of York Independent Living Network, December 2019.


Hi

I am sorry to hear of your decision to close, but congratulate you for recognising your’ lack of capacity in being able to sustain and organise a network of disabled people in York’, be this by restricted finance or some other reasons.

I respect your vision that ‘should be greater involvement of disabled people in all aspects of social and community life, and that this is vital to achieving a truly inclusive society’.

I welcome that you have ‘made arrangements for some of our remaining resources to be used to set up a human rights forum of disabled people and their allies. We believe that we need to bring together a wide and diverse group of disabled people, draw on human rights thinking and take action to achieve greater inclusion. This forum will be coordinated by the York Human Rights City Network during 2020 and we hope it will spark the further and ongoing organisation and action of, by and for disabled people.’ This is showing foresight and showing your respect for people with disabilities.

I therefore wish the forum and the York Human Rights City Network all the best for the future.

I especially wish to thank yourselves Stephen and Abi for acting responsibly as Trustees in conducting your duties and wish all your colleagues the best for their futures.

For whatever the reasons for the forthcoming closure of York Independent Living Network this is no reflection on yourselves and those of your colleagues, it is just, that in the present climate not all organisations will be able to build on their previous successes, which is seeing many good and essential organisations to find that they are not able to continue in the manner that they wish to for the benefit of their members.

All the best for the future for all concerned.

Chris Sterry
a fellow Trustee of a Charity

York Independent Living Network

After much consideration we have decided to close York Independent Living Network.  This will happen at the end December 2019.  We make this decision mainly because of our lack of capacity in being able to sustain and organise a network of disabled people in York.  This is not because we think a network of disabled people and their allies is no longer necessary or relevant.  Rather we believe that there should be greater involvement of disabled people in all aspects of social and community life, and that this is vital to achieving a truly inclusive society. However, we at this time are not able to commit to the effective facilitation of such a network, so therefore have decided to take a change in direction.

We have however made arrangements for some of our remaining resources to be used to set up a human rights forum of disabled people and their…

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Universal Credit staff taped making disgusting comments about claimants


This is disgraceful everyone of those staff needs to be sacked and hopefully will need to apply for Universal Credit, they, then, will see how it is.

Hopefully they can be charged with a crime and then suffer a criminal record.

Tory pledge to consult disabled people on reforming the benefits system branded an ‘insult’ : Welfare Weekly


The UK Government has announced new plans to tackle the barriers faced by disabled people and those with mental health problems, in a move that has been cautiously welcomed by charities but may be more difficult to sell to those who have been affected by years of cuts.

A potential Green Paper will include plans to consult with disabled people and their organisations on reforming the benefits system, which campaigners say is failing disabled people and those with mental health issues.

 

The Government will also look at overhauling Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) “so it is better enforced, more flexible to encourage a phased return to work, and covers the lowest paid”.

And a new disability unit could be set up in the Cabinet Office. One of its first tasks will be to work with Government departments to make housing more accessible to disabled people.

 

Source: Tory pledge to consult disabled people on reforming the benefits system branded an ‘insult’ : Welfare Weekly

The painful journey for disabled people


Disabled people expect PIP to make their life easier, however, the bureaucracy and complexity of the process itself often wears applicants down.

The PIP assessment, in fact, only looks at a limited range of daily living activities which rarely give an accurate or holistic indication of the actual disabled people’s support needs. As a result, many applicants are rejected and apply for ‘mandatory reconsideration’, an internal review of a decision by DWP, which rarely overturn the original verdict. The next, final chance is for the disabled person to appeal.

Almost impossible to get a fair Pip assessment

‘We’ve found that people have a higher cost of living due to the need for help with domestic tasks, having a restricted diet, and needing therapeutic treatment to maintain health which is not available on NHS. None of these difficulties or additional needs are covered in the PIP assessment’, said disability campaigner Catherine Hale, referring to the research work of ‘Chronic Illness Inclusion Project’, which she leads.

The Project aims to bring the chronic illness community together online to explore their experiences under a social model for disability and look at ‘how cultural attitudes and social organisation create unnecessary disadvantage’ to the disabled people’s wellbeing.

Managing such an inspiring online community has given Ms Hale the chance to identify further flaws in the PIP application form.

News from Disability News Service 14th March – DPAC


Disabled people had rights breached before and after Grenfell fire, says watchdog

Disabled people who died in the Grenfell Tower tragedy had their human rights breached by public bodies that failed to plan how they would evacuate their homes in the event of a fire, a report by the equality and human rights watchdog has concluded.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) report says the safety of wheelchair-users and other disabled and older people was overlooked when they were housed on the top floors of the high-rise building.

It says that disabled people and other residents of Grenfell Tower and other nearby housing experienced a series of breaches of their human rights before the fire, including through the failure to ban the combustible cladding that was wrapped around the building, or at least strengthen rules for its use.

But it also says that disabled people’s rights were repeatedly breached in the days and months after the fire.

Disabled people, children, migrants and older people were among the 72 people who died in the Grenfell Tower fire that began in the early hours of 14 June 2017, in homes managed by the state in west London.

The EHRC research, carried out with the social policy think-tank Race on the Agenda, suggests that the right to life of disabled people, older people and families with children was not properly considered in fire safety arrangements, with “particular concerns” about the lack of appropriate planning for evacuating disabled people and other residents.

There is also evidence that the safety notice given to Grenfell residents was only available in English, a language not spoken by many of them.

The report also highlights a continued lack of support after the fire, amounting to inhuman and degrading treatment, particularly in “the inconsistent, and sometimes absent, immediate and long-term support such as medical treatment, counselling, mental health care and adequate housing”.

The report suggests there were breaches of the right to

 

Source: News from Disability News Service 14th March – DPAC

Disabled benefit claimants forced to pay for GP letters they don’t need : Welfare Weekly


Disabled people are being forced to travel several miles to attend benefit assessments and pay for GP letters they don’t actually need, it has been revealed.

The Department for Work and Pensions are allowing private companies like Capita, who are in charge of carrying out benefit assessments, to make it more difficult for people to get the financial support they desperately need.

More than 160,000 people have signed a petition calling on the UK Government to end the injustice.

 

Source: Disabled benefit claimants forced to pay for GP letters they don’t need : Welfare Weekly

Record disability benefit appeal success rates show this ‘cruel’ system is ‘unfit for purpose’ : Welfare Weekly


Record numbers of sick and disabled people are winning appeals against cruel decisions to reduce or axe their vital disability benefits, official figures show.

Figures released by the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) reveal that a record 72% of negative Personal Indepence Payment (PIP) decisions are overturned in favour of claimants on appeal.

The same percentage (72%) of Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) are also successfully overturned at appeal stage, with critics and opponents of the disability benefit assessment system labelling the two benefits as “not fit for purpose”.

MoJ figures show 20,133 people who appealed a decision to change or deny their PIP between July and September 2018, of which 14,581 won their case at tribunal.

Meanwhile, 13,508 people appealed a decision to change or deny their ESA payments, of which 9,684 also won their case on appeal.

 

Source: Record disability benefit appeal success rates show this ‘cruel’ system is ‘unfit for purpose’ : Welfare Weekly