I rely on plastic straws and baby wipes. I’m disabled – I have no choice | Penny Pepper | Opinion | The Guardian


remember the dawning of my green consciousness: the sudden, painful realisation that products were tested on animals. This was in the early 1970s. I was about 10 years old. A teacher told me that baby powder was put into the eyes of cats and dogs to make sure it was safe. She also said that the plastic container would pollute the Earth.

A few years later, as punk sensibility captured my naturally rebellious heart, I immersed myself in the ecological fight. I joined Greenpeace. I wrote letters – even to the pope on his visit to Britain – arguing against the clubbing of baby seals in Canada. This passion has never left me.

Throw into the mix that I’ve been disabled since the age of 14, however, and environmentalism can start to get tricky. Over the years, I’ve had to learn that being green does not always sit comfortably with my access needs.

 

Source: I rely on plastic straws and baby wipes. I’m disabled – I have no choice | Penny Pepper | Opinion | The Guardian

As a disabled person, I had to persevere through rejection


Scope's Blog

Fiona is a 27-year-old who has a very rare bone condition which affects her left leg and hands. It causes cartilage swelling around her bones which restricts her movement.

She went through a difficult journey to find employment, facing challenging attitudes and uncomfortable interviews. After she decided to take an unexpected career turn, she now works as the Disability Specialist at DisabledHolidays.com.

Working in the travel industry has been an unexpected (although fantastic!) career path for me. I completed my Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) in Primary Education in 2013 and then graduated with a Masters in Inclusive and Special Needs Education at the University of Cambridge in 2014.

Unsurprisingly, I expected a career as a Primary School Teacher, however, my search for a teaching job was not easy as I had many unexpected obstacles to overcome. It was tricky to find a part-time job which I needed because of…

View original post 858 more words

DWP piles WCA demand onto ‘humiliated’ abuse survivor | DisabledGo News and Blog


A government contractor has told a traumatised abuse survivor he must be reassessed for employment and support allowance (ESA), just a week after a minister faced a call to resign for threatening to stop another of his disability benefits. Justin Tomlinson, the minister for disabled people, caused outrage last week after it emerged that he had threatened the man – who is waiting to give evidence about the abuse in court – that his benefits would be stopped if he failed to co-operate with a personal independence payment (PIP) reassessment by Atos. David* is a key witness in the trial and has been told by police not to discuss his case, or allow the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) or Atos access to his medical records, because the court proceedings are live and the case is sub judice. DWP finally agreed earlier this month to stop contacting David until after the end of the trial, although he later received a further letter from Atos and a threatening letter from Tomlinson via his

Source: DWP piles WCA demand onto ‘humiliated’ abuse survivor | DisabledGo News and Blog

DWP lies over benefit cap aided and abetted by ignorant and complicit NHF – SPeye Joe (Welfarewrites)


The DWP continues to lie and deceive over the overall benefit cap and is being aided in this by its accomplice-in-chief the National Housing Federation who are (again) in cahoots with the DWP propa…

Source: DWP lies over benefit cap aided and abetted by ignorant and complicit NHF – SPeye Joe (Welfarewrites)

Blue Badge Fraud Investigation – Operation Bodmin | DisabledGo News and Blog


A Blue Badge is a vital lifeline for many disabled people. Without a Blue Badge many disabled people would be stuck in their homes and would be totally dependent on others for help. This is why DMUK takes Blue Badge fraud very seriously. A person who doesn’t need a Blue Badge occupying a disabled bay unnecessarily is one less space for a genuine holder to use. If a disabled person cannot park at their desired destination they will often just have to go home without completing the task that they needed to do. Blue Badge fraud has risen in the last eight years, and is starting to be taken more seriously by local authorities. The Metropolitan Police has not taken this lightly and is working with local authorities in London and their Civil Enforcement Officers (CEOs) to try to stop not only the misuse of Blue Badges, but also the circulation of stolen, fake and expired Badges. The name OPERATION BODMIN was given to the Metropolitan Police and Harringay Council’s surge on the Green lanes

Source: Blue Badge Fraud Investigation – Operation Bodmin | DisabledGo News and Blog

How much more blatant does discrimination have to be?


Poppy's Place

Well, that’s interesting.

I am a Housing Association tenant and I have just received my quarterly residents magazine from the HA and I think I am being discriminated against.

Not me personally but me as a disabled person.

Apparently my area is a test area for Housing Association tenants who want to buy their own home under the Government’s much-trumpeted new ‘Right to Buy’ scheme. Now, I am not actually interested in buying, I am more than happy to go on renting, but I thought I’d read the article anyway just to see what was being proposed.

That’s when I found that I am not eligible, despite living in a pilot area.

Why, I hear you ask.

The reason, as usual, is simple. My impairment. The fact that I am severely disabled is proving to be a barrier once again. According to the article, some types of home and tenancies…

View original post 539 more words

Finding a suitable personal assistant if you’re disabled


Original post from Disabled Go News

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personal-assistant

When the relationship between a disabled person and their assistant works well, it can be fantastic. When it doesn’t, it can be disastrous, says Rupy Kaur.

I first became an employer at 15 during my GCSEs – an additional stress most young people don’t have to think about. I needed to take on a personal assistant (PA) to help me with daily care tasks like dressing, going to the toilet, preparing meals, and also doing admin. I have cerebral palsy, a neurological condition that affects my movement.

Under a new widely welcomed scheme that started in 2001, the council gave me money to recruit my own assistants – they weren’t allocated to me by the local council. Although these direct payments gave me the choice and power to hire and fire, at that age I had no idea how to recruit a good PA.

I didn’t know what to ask them at interview stage, how to write a contract or legally protect myself, let alone how to pay them. But I now had that responsibility.

The council helped me find a few contenders but, due to my lack of experience, the only question I really wanted an answer to at the interview was whether they would feel comfortable wiping my bum. When they answered yes, I thought it was enough evidence to show me they were suitable for the job.

During my time as an employer, I have worked with many PAs – on average 10 a year. There have been some ups and downs. A few PAs caused me problems. They were often late, ignored my needs, talked about how drunk they’d been over the weekend and about intimate details from their personal lives.

As it was the only way that my personal care needs could be met, I went along with it. They were the people I was relying on when I was at my most vulnerable. They were my hands and legs, and it felt like they were the ones who were in charge. I certainly did not feel like an employer.

Incidents included writing their own cheques for payment and exaggerating the hours they had worked. Cheques would also be signed on my behalf. I felt I had no support to manage the situation and was relieved when they left of their own accord.

I’ve had PAs who have stolen from me, played games on their phones when they should have been writing my lecture notes, let me down at the last minute… the list goes on.

Two insisted on working in a pair, which meant my budget was eaten up more quickly than it should have been, so I didn’t have enough funding to cover extra shifts.

But I look back now and realise that these negative experiences have made me more resilient and a better employer.

I now have an accountant that manages payroll, have sound legal contracts, and I am ruthless when I am hiring. I have compiled a 15-page handbook for my new employees to read – not because I’m fussy, but because I have complex needs that would take months to explain. It’s just easier this way.

I have managed to recruit PAs over the years who match my personality, understand my needs and who have become friends while still understanding the boundaries.

For me, a PA is what it says on the tin. I need assistance in order to live my life the way that I want to. I don’t need a carer as I don’t need caring for. I am an autonomous person with the capacity to make my own decisions, and I need somebody who is able to assist me to achieve my goals.

 

Wanted: A Very Personal Assistant is part of the BBC Three Defying The Label season about disabled people. Catch up on the iPlayer attp://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b063j9hx

Roisin Norris

Hi I’m Roisin Norris, Digital Marketing Executive at DisabledGo and I will be uploading blogs and news for you all to read.

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