Parents Want Full Time Return To School For SEN Children


These schools are continuing to feel they are the experts, but experts at what.

Maybe on schools procedure, maybe on educational subject matter, but certainly not on children with disabilities, for that will be the parents and possibly the respective children, but still these schools are showing herd processing.

When will they realise that children are individuals and especially children with disabilities, for what maybe right and good for one, maybe wrong and maybe bad for another.

The schools are also ignoring Department of Education (DoE) guidance, which recommends all children come back fulltime.

But as the Government,early on in the coronavirus pandemic, introduced the Coronavirus Act 2020, which suspended numerous Local Authorities responsibilities, these actions are now coming home to roost.

To enable equality persons with disabilities require more not less, but this Government is unable to understand this. What I am not sure about is, could this be accidental or even more worrying, they already knew the consequences of these actions.

With this Government people with disabilities will never achieve equality, in fact equality will be even more distant.

Same Difference

Parents of children with special educational needs have told the BBC that their children are not being offered the same access to education as their peers because of the restrictions around coronavirus.

The BBC’s Nikki Fox spoke to Dawn Ashton who said she wanted a full-time education for her son Lewis who has been offered two days at Astley Park School.

Headteacher Kieran Welsh said a phased return would allow children to adapt to the new school routine.

“The positive impact of the phased return on children’s learning and well-being has been incredible and a joy to witness.”

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Sharp rise in pupil exclusions from English state schools | Education | The Guardian


Paul Whiteman, the general secretary of the National Association of Head Teachers, said local authority services, such as behaviour support teams and specialist staff such as speech and language therapists, were disappearing, alongside cuts to funding for pupils with special education needs and disabilities.

“Schools can’t do it on their own. To avoid exclusions, they need support from the other local services around them,” Whiteman said.

“Exclusion must not be thought of as getting a child ‘out of the way’ but of finding a better place to serve that child. The issues that underpin exclusions reach far beyond the school gates.”

Pupils with special educational needs accounted for just under half of all exclusions. Pupils with special needs were permanently excluded at a rate six times higher than pupils with no special needs.

Pupils with an education, health and care plan or a statement of special education needs had the highest fixed-period exclusion rate at 16% in 2016-17 – more than five times higher than pupils with no special needs, at 3%.

 

Source: Sharp rise in pupil exclusions from English state schools | Education | The Guardian

Half of pupils expelled from school ‘mentally ill’ | DisabledGo News and Blog


Half of pupils expelled from England’s schools have a mental health issue, according to analysis of official data. The Institute of Public Policy Research suggests if excluded students with undiagnosed problems were included, the rate would be much higher. This figure compares with one in 50 pupils in the wider population who have a mental health condition. The government said it would be publishing plans to improve mental health services later in the year. ‘Thrown out’ The research comes as the number of fixed term and permanent exclusions is rising. Figures just published show that last year, some 6,685 pupils were excluded permanently from state primary, secondary and special schools. Some 35 pupils were excluded every day in 2015-16 – five more daily than in the previous year. Eight out of 10 permanent exclusions happen in secondary schools. Here, the rate of permanent exclusions has increased from 0.15% in 2014-15 to 0.17% in 2015-16 – equivalent to 17 pupils per 10,000. Overall,

Source: Half of pupils expelled from school ‘mentally ill’ | DisabledGo News and Blog