Some smokers credit e-cigarettes with saving their lives – does that matter? : The Conversation


Concerns about e-cigarettes are growing, with the AMA calling for a ban. With the Great American Smokeout on Nov. 21, it’s worth asking: What do smokers think?

Source: Some smokers credit e-cigarettes with saving their lives – does that matter? : The Conversation

Factory worker, 57, is first Briton to die from lung disease ‘linked to vaping’ | Daily Mail Online


  • Terry Miller, 57, from Gateshead is the first death to be attributed with vaping 
  • Ex-factory worker’s body was found to have oils saturating his lungs in 2010
  • Vaping linked with 200 health problems including pneumonia, says UK report
  • In US 13 people have died due to vaping and more than 800 have fallen ill

A 57-year-old British factory worker has today been named as the first e-cigarette user in the world feared to have developed a fatal disease directly linked to his vaping habit.

Terry Miller, 57, from Gateshead, Tyne and Wear, died nine years ago after developing lipoid pneumonia and doctors said oil from vaping fluid was found in his lungs.

His wife Glynis believes her husband’s death was hastened by his use of e-cigarettes – claiming he was better off still smoking.

Mrs Miller has today called for a new inquest into his death after the first one in 2010 recorded an open verdict.

She says that back then Public Health England did not have the evidence to back up its claim about the safety of e-cigarettes, which are used by 3million people in Britain.

Her husband’s case has been highlighted as a report from the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency said vaping hit the health of 200 British e-cigarette users since 2014.

In America, there are fears that 13 people have died due to vaping and more than 800 have fallen ill – all recorded after Mr Miller died in 2010.

 

Source: Factory worker, 57, is first Briton to die from lung disease ‘linked to vaping’ | Daily Mail Online

Vaping likely has dangers that could take years for scientists to even know about


The rise in cases of otherwise healthy young adults who have been hospitalized or even died from vaping-associated lung injury is alarming.

Many people don’t know what is contained in these vaping devices, what the reported health effects actually mean, and, most importantly, why all of this developed so quickly, considering that e-cigarettes have only been popular for fewer than 10 years.

Vaping describes the process of inhaling aerosols generated by devices such as e-cigarettes.

When e-cigarettes first came to the U.S. in 2006, many smoking cessation experts were optimistic. They viewed the delivery of nicotine through e-cigarettes to be a useful alternative to traditional cigarettes. That is because e-cigarettes did not have all of the other harmful combustion products inhaled through cigarette smoke. Since there is no doubt that smoking traditional cigarettes is harmful to your health – and the number one cause of preventable death in the U.S. – e-cigarettes were marketed as a “safer” alternative.

As an inhalation toxicologist, I study how inhaled chemicals, particles and other agents affect human health. Since e-cigarettes were introduced, I have been concerned about how the scientific community could possibly know the full spectrum of their dangers. After all, it took decades for epidemiologists to discover that regularly inhaling the smoke from burning plant material, tobacco, caused lung cancer. Why would the scientific community be so quick to assume e-cigarettes would not have hidden dangers that might take years to manifest too?

 

Source: Vaping likely has dangers that could take years for scientists to even know about

Achieving a smokefree pregnancy: can e-cigarettes help? – Jo Locker | Viv Bennett


Use of electronic cigarettes continues to rise and midwives and health visitors are being increasingly asked for advice in relation to their use during pregnancy. This blog provides some top line

Source: Achieving a smokefree pregnancy: can e-cigarettes help? – Jo Locker | Viv Bennett