Premier League clubs ‘will break access pledge’ despite billion pound transfer spree | DisabledGo News and Blog


Football’s Premier League will break a pledge that all of its stadiums would be accessible to disabled football fans by next August, despite its clubs spending more than a billion pounds on player transfers this summer. The Premier League, the governing body for the top 20 club sides in England and Wales, delivered a high-profile pledge last year that every one of its members would meet strict access standards by August 2017. But peers heard last week that seven Premier League clubs were set to break the pledge to meet standards laid out in guidance 12 years ago in The Accessible Stadia Guide (ASG). ASG includes guidelines on car parking, accessible information, the minimum number of wheelchair spaces for spectators, location of viewing areas for disabled supporters, and staff training. And today (Thursday), the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) revealed that the Premier League had acknowledged in meetings that many clubs would miss the August deadline. Lord Holmes, EHRC’s

Source: Premier League clubs ‘will break access pledge’ despite billion pound transfer spree | DisabledGo News and Blog

FoI reveals EHRC chair’s ‘conflict of interest’ over welfare reform inquiry | DisabledGo News and Blog


The equality watchdog’s new chair, who is set to lead an investigation into whether Tory welfare reforms breached disabled people’s human rights, worked for the government on key contracts at the heart of those reforms, Disability News Service can reveal. David Isaac was appointed by the government to chair the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) earlier this year, despite concerns raised by two parliamentary committees over “serious potential conflict of interest” caused by his work as a partner of law firm Pinsent Masons. He specialises at Pinsent Masons in providing advice on “major public and private sector UK and global commercial and outsourcing projects”, and his own profile on the firm’s website previously stated that he “leads teams of lawyers on major projects” for, among others, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), although the reference to DWP has since been removed. But his appointment as EHRC’s new chair came as the watchdog announced that it was to

Source: FoI reveals EHRC chair’s ‘conflict of interest’ over welfare reform inquiry | DisabledGo News and Blog

EHRC earns cautious approval for response to Equality Act report | DisabledGo News and Blog


The equality watchdog has earned cautious approval for its response to recommendations made by a House of Lords committee that examined the impact of the Equality Act on disabled people. The committee concluded earlier this year that the government was failing to protect disabled people from discrimination, and that there were problems with laws designed to address disability discrimination in “almost every part of society”. Last week, the disabled crossbench peer Baroness Campbell, who was a member of the Equality Act 2010 and disability committee throughout its nine-month inquiry, said she was “bitterly disappointed and angry” with the government’s response to the report, which she said was a “wasted opportunity to kick-start a progressive equality agenda for the UK’s 11 million disabled people”. This week, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) delivered its own response to the report, including eight recommendations that call for it to take action itself. Of those eight

Source: EHRC earns cautious approval for response to Equality Act report | DisabledGo News and Blog

‘Enforcement is key on Equality Act’ | DisabledGo News and Blog


Lawyers, campaigners, peers and academics have spoken of how disabled people can find it almost impossible to enforce their rights to equality, six years after the introduction of the Equality Act. They were speaking at a seminar in London – organised by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds, the legal firm Unity Law, and the Cloisters set of barristers – that discussed the findings of a landmark report by a Lords committee on the impact of the Equality Act 2010 on disabled people. The committee, which reported in March, concluded that government was failing to protect disabled people from discrimination, while laws designed to address disability discrimination were “not working in practice”, and spending cuts were having “a hugely adverse effect on disabled people”. Several of those who contributed to yesterday’s (27 April) seminar spoke of how disabled people’s access to justice had been damaged over the last 20 years, since the first Disability Discrimination

Source: ‘Enforcement is key on Equality Act’ | DisabledGo News and Blog

EHRC document to be presented to the UN, seen exclusively by the Guardian, says that new contract discriminates against female doctors


ukgovernmentwatch

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/apr/28/equality-watchdog-warns-junior-doctors-contract-potentially-illegal

GR Comment:   The obvious solution is admit you’re wrong Mr Hunt, not impose the contract then train and hire more hospital staff to make the wards and casualties function correctly and promptly without demoralising and exhausting the existing Nurses and Doctors.

Unfortunately though we have a Chancellor commited to delivering a 10bn surplus by 2020 and he has a long term Economic plan to achieve this. The plan to show off such a rosy Economy in 2020 is to remove most of the money from the public through sneaky stuff like this doctor contract shambles or putting little caps on this and reductions on that OR to use more blatant methods like sanctions and up front cuts to social security, council budgets and public investment. Essentially he’s planning to pick our pockets and then present it back to us in 2020 after you’ve lived through 5 years of less…

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Fresh staff cuts at EHRC ‘will undermine its vital work’ | DisabledGo News and Blog


The equality watchdog is set to make nearly 30 members of staff redundant, in what critics say is a blow to its efforts to enforce equality laws and hold the government to account over its record on disability discrimination. The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) told staff on Tuesday this week (19 April) that as many as 29 of about 200 posts were at risk, with the possibility of some compulsory redundancies. In a consultation paper titled Moving Towards A New EHRC, the commission talks of “fundamental changes to the way in which we do our work” and says that it will “examine opportunities for sharing services with other regulators, and build more alliances with third parties”. It points as an example of such alliances elsewhere in the public sector to the link between NHS Blood and Transplant and the dating site Tinder to raise awareness about organ donations. It also says that it will now “focus on a smaller number of bigger projects and programmes”. The paper mentions an

Source: Fresh staff cuts at EHRC ‘will undermine its vital work’ | DisabledGo News and Blog