Archives for posts with tag: elderly

The UK is approaching a perfect storm with an ageing population and many people unprepared for the future

Former Liberal Democrat cabinet minister Ed Davey (centre) and campaigners protest against Theresa May’s social care policy during the 2017 general election campaign. Photograph: Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

For a short while, it seemed like the issue of social care funding would finally be addressed after years of government procrastination. The Conservatives promised a consultation on social care reformU-turned on the so-called dementia tax and, instead, confirmed their intention to cap the amount people pay towards care.

But now that plans to introduce such a cap have been scrapped and the social care consultation is rumoured to have been delayed until next summer, it seems that the government has followed previous administrations and kicked social care funding into the long grass.

Such a decision is worrying and flies in the face of public opinion. A cap on care costs will increase the fairness of social care, so it’s risky to turn our backs on this idea without an alternative plan in place. There are too many vulnerable older people at risk.

Following an election campaign full of confusing messages about social care, Anchor, England’s largest not-for-profit provider of care and housing for older people, conducted a public poll to gather insight into people’s understanding. Our research found that 70% of British adults believe there should be a cap on social care costs, while almost half believe that social care – including dementia care – should always be paid for by the state.

Sir Andrew Dilnot, who first proposed a cap on social care, has cautioned that plans to abandon it could cause a “catastrophic risk” of poverty in older age. And councils have warned that they cannot afford to pay for all those in need of state-funded care if the dementia tax is introduced, putting many providers at risk of going out of business.

The question of how we fund social care remains unanswered, and the most recent suggestions fail to get to the crux of the issue.

Jackie Doyle-Price, the social care minister, suggested that older people should sell their homes to fund their care. But this doesn’t take the full picture into account. There is a perception that all or most older people are well-off and own their own home – this isn’t the case. For those older people who are home owners and are, to quote the minister, “sitting in homes too big for their needs”, we know that two thirds would like to downsize but can’t due to a lack of suitable options.

Again, this comes down to a lack of funding and supportive policies, despite the fact that more retirement housing could save £14.5bn to the public purse over 50 years.

Whichever direction the future of social care funding is heading, and whether a cap is introduced or not, the government must be open and honest about how social care will be paid for so that everyone can plan for the best possible life in older age. At present, this is far from the case.

More than a fifth of people wrongly believe the state pays entirely for care needs in later life, and more than half underestimate social care costs by up to 20%. Considering these misconceptions, it’s no wonder that just 14% of us are currently saving for our care in later life.

We’re approaching a perfect storm where the future of social care funding is unclear, the population is getting older, and most of us are unprepared for the future. We need a transparent and sustainable long-term strategy that integrates social care, health and housing. Recognising, and acting on this, is our only option.

  • Jane Ashcroft is chief executive of Anchor

Source: Social care funding can’t take any more setbacks. It needs reform now : The Guardian

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A leading social care group has warned that any predicted increases in NHS pay must be matched by better funding for the independent care sector to avoid a

Source: Better funding for social care needed now to avoid staffing crisis | Care Industry News


The poor side of life

Today’s demo started rather hurriedly and to be honest I didn’t know if I was coming or going. This feeling was amplified because it was cold, rainy and my daughter was a bit fed up. understandable of course. But she soon settled down into our usual routine and all was well.

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We are seeing a lot of new faces due to Stalybridge Jobcentre shutting. They don’t know us and what we are doing, and we don’t know them or their situations either. So we have to start from scratch, which at times isn’t easy.  But it’s a whole lot harder for them.

I started a conversation with a man who had been previously attending Stalybridge Jobcentre for his appointments. The first thing that he said to me was that he couldn’t believe how rude the front desk staff are at  Ashton Jobcentre, and how rude some of the advisors are also…

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Although Frances Ryan is correct regarding the systematic erasure of adults with disabilities (Social care is not just about the elderly, 10 February), she misses the point as to the legal intention of David Mowat’s statement. The last group of disabled people in plain sight but relegated to non-existence except during Red Nose Day are of course disabled children and their carers, usually parents and family. Parents have a statutory duty of care towards their children, which adults do not have towards other adults, hence the government’s need to make it more palatable for adults to care for their elderly relatives. There is the perception that parent carers of disabled children, and their children, get the lion’s share of the care system. This is untrue. In fact, the opposite is true. It is disabled children who have lost out completely to adult care, with families and children being abandoned by the state, and indeed wider society, who view disabled people – adults and children –

Source: The social care system is failing too many | DisabledGo News and Blog


Age UK report calls for urgent action, including cash injection in spring budget and development of long-term plan Social care in England is at risk of imminent collapse in the worst affected areas unless urgent steps are taken to address the crisis engulfing the sector, Age UK has warned. The charity’s latest report on the healthcare of older people calls for a cash injection into the adult social care system in the spring budget and the development of a long-term solution to a problem that will otherwise become more acute. Analysis previously published by Age UK suggests almost 1.2 million people aged 65 and over do not receive the care and support they need with essential daily activities such as eating, dressing and bathing. That figure has shot up by 17.9% in just a year and almost by 50% since 2010, with nearly one in eight now living with some level of unmet need, it says. Age UK’s charity director, Caroline Abrahams, said the report makes for “frightening reading”, adding:

Source: English social care system for elderly facing ‘complete collapse’ | DisabledGo News and Blog


Some elderly may be able to fund their own care, that is until their finances have dwindled to NIL and they will be doing so now. However, what about the elderly that have been in low paid jobs and have not been able to create a financial surplus during their working life, at times only being able to scrape by.

In all this what about the people with disabilities and find it impossible to obtain work, for in the main the work or understandable and knowledgeable employers are few and far between.

This all assumes that the persons with disabilities have the capacity not only to do work, but also to understand the concept of work. There are many with learning disabilities, who are alive today mainly because of the advances in medical science for in years gone by they would most likely not have advanced into adulthood. So, they will never have the opportunity to save and amass any monies to provide for their care throughout their entire life. So if these threats come about how will they survive.


Lord McColl is obsessed with just one aspect, when there are many aspects to consider.

Health and Social Care go in tandem as you can not fund one without the other or even worse under fund both.

Health and Social Care need to work closer together and it does have to be a consideration should not one organisation manage both Social Care and Health, for to not to do so is bound to have some duplication of work, which is not cost effective, especially having two management structures.

However, in many cases, family life is seriously fragmented for in 1948 it was generally that the male was the person who went to work, while the female looked after the family. This is not so today for in many families both parents are working so that they can, in some respects are able to function as a family unit by having the monetary means to fund a reasonable life.

As both parents are now working, this creates problems in creating meals and there many families create meals by using convenience foods or take always, which in some respects is not cost effective, for within the cost is an element of preparation by another party.

Family units are now more diverse and to find work many units have splintered across the UK and beyond.

You then have the power of the media, especially advertisements, which are geared to influence children and parents alike, by promoting foods which are considered less healthy, but are very tasty and appealing.

Also are Social Care and Health sufficient to manage the ever increasing population, the living longer factor and the increase in persons with disabilities, both physical and learning, due to improvements in medical science.

The may be other factors, but to chose just one shows complete ignorance of the problems and thereby the solutions.


The debate focuses on the elderly, but hundreds of thousands of people of all ages are made to suffer because the vital help they need is being cut. ‘In most discussions on social care, disabled pe…

Source: The social care crisis hits disabled people hard. So why are they forgotten? : Guardian. – DWPExamination.


Will this apply to the Queen?

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Ministers yesterday vowed to make it ‘easier’ for older homeowners to move into sheltered accommodation. Pictured is housing minister Gavin Barwell.

Source: Elderly in big houses could have incentives to downsize | Daily Mail Online


When will the Government and other powers that be realise that care is not just confined to the elderly, even though their care is very important, due to increases in mortality not only for the elderly, but also for persons with disabilities, especially the exceedingly wide spectrum of Learning Disability and Autism.

Care minister David Mowat should come out of the ivory tower of Westminster and find out for himself about the giving of care, for many families already do provide care to their loved ones and only call for local authority help when this reaches a crisis point, in that through their caring roles their own physical and mental health is deteriorating and they need the help to continue to care for their loved ones.

For in the UK today care provided by family members saves the country £1.39 billion in care costs, can they really do more.

Care minister David Mowat does not have a clue and neither do many others in Government and in some respects Parliament.

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