Covid’s Harmful Effect On Disabled People’s Activity Exposed By Survey


Again persons with disabilities are adversely affected through no fault of their own.

Disabled people are already not treated equally in UK society, even though there has been legislation to correct this. This includes the Disability Discrimination Acts 1995, and Disability Discrimination Act 2005, and Equality Act 2010, but much more needs to be done. The Government compound this in their attitude to disability benefits and now COVID, which has closed many opportunities for people, including disabled people to engage in sports, a lifeline for many disabled people to engage with.

Then there is the COVID vaccine programme which as only minimally looked at and provided priority to some disabled people, namely Downs Syndrome.

Much more needs to be done for any chance of equality to be gained, but this Government does not have a clue.

For they are also failing to act on Social Care, which many disabled people and others rely on to maintain life.

This is a Government of in-action when it comes to disabled people.

Same Difference

Covid-19 has reversed progress made in levels of activity among disabled people, according to a new report, amid concerns the gains may not be recovered because of the scarifying effects of the pandemic.

The observations come in the second Annual Disability and Activity Survey, which measures participation and attitudes towards physical activity among disabled people. Conducted by the disability charity Activity Alliance, it is seen as a companion to Sport England’s Active Lives study.Leading Paralympian says lockdown needs of disabled people ignoredRead more

The survey found that before the onset of Covid the number of disabled people who said they were physically inactive had fallen to 34%, down from 41% the year before. This corresponded with an 18% rise (from 40% to 58%) in the share of those who said they had “the opportunity to be as physically active as they want to be”. Following Covid, however…

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Disabled Juror Forced To Quit Case At Maidstone Crown Court Because All Lifts Were Broken


So, here we are again, yes, the inequality with regards to disability which is abound within the UK.

It is now over 10 years since the Equality Act 2010, so why is inequality so rife in the UK?

But, firstly what is disability here is the guidance.

The disability definition from the Equality Act 2010

Section A: The Definition
Main elements of the definition of disability
A1. The Act defines a disabled person as a person with a disability. A
person has a disability for the purposes of the Act if he or she has a
physical or mental impairment and the impairment has a substantial
and long-term adverse effect on his or her ability to carry out normal
day-to-day activities (S6(1)).
A2. This means that, in general:
• the person must have an impairment that is either physical or
mental (see paragraphs A3 to A8);
• the impairment must have adverse effects which are substantial
(see Section B);
• the substantial adverse effects must be long-term (see Section C);
and
• the long-term substantial adverse effects must be effects on
normal day-to-day activities (see Section D).
This definition is subject to the provisions in Schedule 1 (Sch1).
All of the factors above must be considered when determining whether a
person is disabled.

This guidance then goes on to define the severity of disability and other factors.

Then it goes further and defines the ‘Reasonable Adjustments that need to be considered.

Who has to comply and who may not to a degree,

However, in this instance Maidstone Crown Court had complied with the Equality Act 2010, but do so circumstances, maybe outside their control, came into effect making all 5 lifts to be unworkable at the particular point in time.

Could it be argued at reasonable steps to repair some of the lifts were not taken, yes, it could, but that, in this instance would not make it possible for the juror to be able to perform their duty as a juror within the court.

Could other reasonable adjustments have been made, well, yes a video link could have been installed, but was there time for this or had it not been thought of.

Perhaps, in this day of more media being available, such adjustments should be made as a matter of course, to prevent this unexpected breakdown of lists, or would it be viewed as an expense too far for something which may never occur again.

For ‘reasonable’ covers a major area and reasonable is not always sufficiently defined, if ever, and costs would be a factor in deciding reasonability.

This is something for Courts to decide, maybe, even, Maidstone Crown Court!

Same Difference

A disabled juror was forced to quit her duty because all five lifts in a Kent court were broken.

The woman was discharged from a robbery trial after spending a fortnight listening to the case because she could not get back in.

It left just 10 out of 12 jurors because another was discharged earlier.

The case finished the next day with unanimous guilty verdicts against two men at Maidstone Crown Court, the MirrorOnline reports.

Alison Kerry, of disability equality charity Scope, said: “Disabled people shouldn’t be barred from doing their civic duty because our courtrooms aren’t accessible.

“One in five of us is disabled and juries should reflect that.

“It’s unacceptable five lifts could be out of order at once.

“This could also prevent disabled clerks and solicitors from being able to work.

Courts and the government should do much more to make sure our justice system is…

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The pathetic harassment of Greta Thunberg by a grown man is a glimpse of the reality for disabled kids


The lives of some persons with disabilities have improved, but have they improved enough and for many there has been no improvement.

Is it not sad, that in this, now 21st centuary we are in some respects still in the sixteenth and seventeens centuary in our views and actiosns around disabilities.

In the UK we had the Equality act 2010 and before that the Disabilities Discrimination Act 1995 and still there are problems with access, in many buildings and certainly transport.

There are wheelchair spaces on public transport, at least 1 and maybe 2, but access to them may not be possible due to them being occupied by pushchairs. Even tough there have been some court cases around this, there are still some bus drivers who will not defend the right of access for persons in wheelchairs and allow the people with pushchairs to remain where they are.

In trains a disabled person, at times may be be able to alight at a station of their choice because they have not given prior notice or the station is not manned, or there is no disability access.
Access to planes is even worse.

Employment is still a major problem.

Schools the avenue for education, is still not educating pupils on disability issues and bullying, well, it is still around in abundance.

Bullying is still active within schools and the schools themselves are not tackling the problem with sufficient force, if they are , in fact , attending to the problem.
Many are solely relying on their Anti-bullying Policy, which in many instances it not worth the paper it is written on, but is used as a means to defend the school that they are dealing with it.

In fact many mainstream schools are totalyly unable to accommodate persons with disabilities, but do so with disasterous results.

People with disabilities are not going away, as they were in the 40s when they were incarcerated in institutions, in fact, even today, there are some persons who feel that was and should still be the right approach.

The number of Persons with Disabilities is increasing and they are living to an older age than before, with more persons with complex needs, mainly due to the advancement of medical science.

Modern Society, needs to get their act together and vastly improve the outlook for persons with disabilities.

In fact, there needs to be ‘zero tolerence’ with the acts of abuse occurring in every facet of Modern Society in the, so called, ‘civilised’ world.

Then we can they try to educate certain areas, in what is called the 3rd World.

Why is it called the 3rd World for who is in the 1st and then the 2nd Worlds?

The DWP just won a court case allowing it to openly discriminate against people | The Canary


The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) just won a court case over a controversial cap on a benefit. A solicitor in the case has gone so far as to say the law is now ‘allowing’ the DWP to discriminate against people. What’s more, the DWP even admits that the benefit in question ends up making money for the taxpayer.

The DWP: capping again

As The Canary previously reported, the case centred around the Access to Work (AtW) policy. It is a scheme where the DWP gives a grant to an employee for changes or support they need to carry out their job. This is on top of any reasonable adjustments an employer should make under the Equality Act 2010.

AtW was introduced in 1994 with no limit on the funding available. But in 2015, the Conservative government capped the amount of money claimants could get at £42,100. It was going to increase this amount in April 2018 to £43,100. But on 22 March, the government said it would up it to £57,000. It is the cap itself which was central to the court case.

The legal case

The claimant, David Buxton, argued that the cap breached the government’s obligations under the Equality Act. This is because it doesn’t provide enough support to cover his needs. As the Disability News Service (DNSreported, Buxton, the chief executive of the charity Action on Disability, brought the case against the DWP because it would only give him British Sign Language (BSL) interpreters three days a week for his full-time job.

Buxton and his legal team from Deighton Pierce Glynn argued that the cap discriminates against him. This is because it leaves him with no communication support for two days a week.

Work and pensions secretary Esther McVey claims that the cap was put in place:

in order to encourage better use of public funds and to enable Access to Work to support more people – particularly traditionally under-represented groups…

She also said that the cap would free up £2m a year, to “support growing numbers” of people claiming AtW. Effectively, the government’s argument is to take money away from people at the top of the AtW spend and give it to those at the bottom.

A judgement

 

Source: The DWP just won a court case allowing it to openly discriminate against people | The Canary

Government repeatedly ignores its own advisers on ‘toxic’ train access | DisabledGo News and Blog


The government has repeatedly ignored concerns raised by its own accessible transport advisers about the “toxic” impact on disabled people of running trains without a member of customer service staff on board, official documents have revealed.

The Disabled Persons Transport Advisory Committee (DPTAC) has been warning the Department for Transport (DfT) of its concerns for more than two years, according to letters, minutes of meetings and responses to public consultations.

DPTAC’s warnings have only emerged because of documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act by the rail users’ campaign group The Association of British Commuters.

DPTAC – most of whose members are disabled people – first wrote to a senior DfT civil servant in April 2016 to warn of the “toxic combination of driver-only operated (DOO) trains and unstaffed stations”.

It warned then that such a combination, if there were no customer service staff on the train, was unlawful under the Equality Act.

But DPTAC has continued to raise the issue with the government, with further warnings issued in a response to a consultation in February this year; in its response to the government’s draft transport accessibility action plan; and even – two months ago – in a face-to-face meeting with transport accessibility minister Nusrat Ghani.

Ghani dismissed those concerns in the meeting.

 

Source: Government repeatedly ignores its own advisers on ‘toxic’ train access | DisabledGo News and Blog

Disabled comedian left trapped on board train after it leaves


This is a travesty and completely against what should be in the Equality Act 2010. How can one human being be treated like this and by a, so called, nationised industry.

Those who want whole scale re-nationalisation hold LNER as an example, but an example of what, it appears total inequality.

It would appear that reasonable adjustments need to be made, like providing all disabiled people who travel on public transport some form of immediate communication to stop this occurring again.

Why can not these incidents be treated as a’Hate Crime’.

‘spokesman for LNER told the BBC: “We are very sorry for the unacceptable experience Ms Davis had whilst travelling with us.

“We are fully investigating the incident to understand what went wrong and to ensure that lessons are learnt for the future.”  But will they, how many times over many years have these words ‘lessons are learnt ‘ been mentioned, but are they, well, if they are you can count them on ‘one’ finger.

‘Scandal’ of new rail station set to be built without step-free access to trains | DisabledGo News and Blog


A new rail station being built as part of a multi-billion pound regeneration programme will not enable wheelchair-users to board trains without the help of staff and a ramp, disabled campaigners have warned.

Brent Cross West Thameslink is being built as part of the £4.5 billion Cricklewood Brent Cross development in north-west London, a partnership between Barnet council and the private sector.

But current plans for the station, which is due to open in 2022, are that it will be step-free from the entrance to the platform, but not from the platform to the train.

This appears to be because building the higher platforms necessary for wheelchair-users to board trains without manual ramps and assistance would mean freight trains would have to slow down when passing those higher platforms.

Campaigners believe that although most freight trains will pass through the station’s dedicated freight platform, some will be routed through passenger platforms, and it could delay the passenger services behind them if they are forced to slow down.

The controversy could prove embarrassing for Govia Thameslink Railway, the company which will run Thameslink services through the station.

 

Source: ‘Scandal’ of new rail station set to be built without step-free access to trains | DisabledGo News and Blog

Autistic teen’s legal fight over ‘physical abuse’ school exclusion | DisabledGo News and Blog


A legal case being heard this week highlights how disabled children who can be physically aggressive because of their impairment are currently being failed by equality laws, say inclusive education campaigners.

The upper tribunal this week heard the appeal brought by the parents of a 13-year-old disabled boy, known as L, who was excluded from school because of behaviour linked to his autism.

The way that Equality Act regulations are currently interpreted means children like L who are defined as having “a tendency to physical abuse” are often not treated as “disabled” and are therefore not protected by the Equality Act.

The lack of protection under the Equality Act means schools do not have to justify how a decision to exclude a disabled child in these circumstances is proportionate or explain how they have made reasonable adjustments to support the pupil so the behaviour can be prevented or reduced.

Statistics show that almost half of all school exclusions involve a child with special educational needs.

Two years ago, a report by a House of Lords committee on the impact of the Equality Act on disabled people said the regulations had “unintentionally, discouraged schools from paying sufficient attention to their duties” under the act.

 

Source: Autistic teen’s legal fight over ‘physical abuse’ school exclusion | DisabledGo News and Blog

I’ve been left on trains and called ‘a wheelchair’ – train companies need to improvfully e their treatment of disabled customers


A case in question showing how it is and this is not the exception, but the norm.

Disabled people have a right to be treated equally as with everyone else, they are not the problem. The problem is Society and those who should be there to assist.

The Disability Discrimination Act 2005 (DDA) and amended by the Equality Act 2010 provided access conditions on businesses and operators to provide equal access for persons with disabilities so they can live their lives on a similar basis to those of us who do not have disabilities.

But these acts gave so many concessions to businesses and operators so that in many instances there did not, fully, have to comply.

It is some 13 years since the DDA and some 8 years since the Equality Act, surely sufficient time for all businesses and operators to provide equal access. Why should a person with disabilities have to make extensive plans ahead of venturing out when people with no disabilities can do this, virtually on the spur of the moment.

This is not right and should not be allowed to occur.

Come on the UK, for goodness sakes get your Acts together.

Scope's Blog

This week, BBC Rip Off Britain highlights the experience of disabled passengers on trains. Far too often, inaccessible transport stops disabled people from enjoying the same opportunities as everyone else. In some cases, people have been through stressful and upsetting incidents – from train staff forgetting them to being treated like an object. In this blog, Steph shares her experiences. 

Every day across the UK 100s of disabled people are left stranded on train platforms. As a wheelchair user, I use trains frequently to go to work and to socialise. But, of course, the one thing that I’m constantly aware of when travelling is accessibility.

When it comes to train travel, both locally and nationally, train companies have issues with the way that they deal with disabled people.

If you’re disabled, you always have to plan ahead

I have to plan my journey before I go anywhere in ways that non-disabled…

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