Disabled comedian left trapped on board train after it leaves


This is a travesty and completely against what should be in the Equality Act 2010. How can one human being be treated like this and by a, so called, nationised industry.

Those who want whole scale re-nationalisation hold LNER as an example, but an example of what, it appears total inequality.

It would appear that reasonable adjustments need to be made, like providing all disabiled people who travel on public transport some form of immediate communication to stop this occurring again.

Why can not these incidents be treated as a’Hate Crime’.

‘spokesman for LNER told the BBC: “We are very sorry for the unacceptable experience Ms Davis had whilst travelling with us.

“We are fully investigating the incident to understand what went wrong and to ensure that lessons are learnt for the future.”  But will they, how many times over many years have these words ‘lessons are learnt ‘ been mentioned, but are they, well, if they are you can count them on ‘one’ finger.

Govt Newspeak

Tanyalee Davis taken 50 miles out of way, days after she was ‘harassed’ over using a disabled space on another train

Tanyalee Davis with hosts Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langford on ITV’s This Morning show after the first incident.

A comedian who felt “harassed and humiliated” for using a disabled space on a train for her mobility scooter, prompting an apology from the operating company, has had yet another bad experience on the railways.

Tanyalee Davis was en route to York for a show and, although she had already spoken to staff to ensure she would be helped off the London North Eastern Railway (LNER) train, no one came to assist – meaning she had to stay on board until Darlington, 50 miles away.

Canadian-born Davis, 47, who has a form of dwarfism, was ordered to vacate the disabled space on a GWR train earlier this week.

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‘Scandal’ of new rail station set to be built without step-free access to trains | DisabledGo News and Blog


A new rail station being built as part of a multi-billion pound regeneration programme will not enable wheelchair-users to board trains without the help of staff and a ramp, disabled campaigners have warned.

Brent Cross West Thameslink is being built as part of the £4.5 billion Cricklewood Brent Cross development in north-west London, a partnership between Barnet council and the private sector.

But current plans for the station, which is due to open in 2022, are that it will be step-free from the entrance to the platform, but not from the platform to the train.

This appears to be because building the higher platforms necessary for wheelchair-users to board trains without manual ramps and assistance would mean freight trains would have to slow down when passing those higher platforms.

Campaigners believe that although most freight trains will pass through the station’s dedicated freight platform, some will be routed through passenger platforms, and it could delay the passenger services behind them if they are forced to slow down.

The controversy could prove embarrassing for Govia Thameslink Railway, the company which will run Thameslink services through the station.

 

Source: ‘Scandal’ of new rail station set to be built without step-free access to trains | DisabledGo News and Blog

Autistic teen’s legal fight over ‘physical abuse’ school exclusion | DisabledGo News and Blog


A legal case being heard this week highlights how disabled children who can be physically aggressive because of their impairment are currently being failed by equality laws, say inclusive education campaigners.

The upper tribunal this week heard the appeal brought by the parents of a 13-year-old disabled boy, known as L, who was excluded from school because of behaviour linked to his autism.

The way that Equality Act regulations are currently interpreted means children like L who are defined as having “a tendency to physical abuse” are often not treated as “disabled” and are therefore not protected by the Equality Act.

The lack of protection under the Equality Act means schools do not have to justify how a decision to exclude a disabled child in these circumstances is proportionate or explain how they have made reasonable adjustments to support the pupil so the behaviour can be prevented or reduced.

Statistics show that almost half of all school exclusions involve a child with special educational needs.

Two years ago, a report by a House of Lords committee on the impact of the Equality Act on disabled people said the regulations had “unintentionally, discouraged schools from paying sufficient attention to their duties” under the act.

 

Source: Autistic teen’s legal fight over ‘physical abuse’ school exclusion | DisabledGo News and Blog

I’ve been left on trains and called ‘a wheelchair’ – train companies need to improvfully e their treatment of disabled customers


A case in question showing how it is and this is not the exception, but the norm.

Disabled people have a right to be treated equally as with everyone else, they are not the problem. The problem is Society and those who should be there to assist.

The Disability Discrimination Act 2005 (DDA) and amended by the Equality Act 2010 provided access conditions on businesses and operators to provide equal access for persons with disabilities so they can live their lives on a similar basis to those of us who do not have disabilities.

But these acts gave so many concessions to businesses and operators so that in many instances there did not, fully, have to comply.

It is some 13 years since the DDA and some 8 years since the Equality Act, surely sufficient time for all businesses and operators to provide equal access. Why should a person with disabilities have to make extensive plans ahead of venturing out when people with no disabilities can do this, virtually on the spur of the moment.

This is not right and should not be allowed to occur.

Come on the UK, for goodness sakes get your Acts together.

Scope's Blog

This week, BBC Rip Off Britain highlights the experience of disabled passengers on trains. Far too often, inaccessible transport stops disabled people from enjoying the same opportunities as everyone else. In some cases, people have been through stressful and upsetting incidents – from train staff forgetting them to being treated like an object. In this blog, Steph shares her experiences. 

Every day across the UK 100s of disabled people are left stranded on train platforms. As a wheelchair user, I use trains frequently to go to work and to socialise. But, of course, the one thing that I’m constantly aware of when travelling is accessibility.

When it comes to train travel, both locally and nationally, train companies have issues with the way that they deal with disabled people.

If you’re disabled, you always have to plan ahead

I have to plan my journey before I go anywhere in ways that non-disabled…

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Why a post-racial British society remains a myth – even in universities : The Conversation


Racism is truly alive and kicking in British society, not least in liberal, progressive universities. This was evident in early March when a black female student released a video of people shouting “we hate the blacks” outside her room in her halls of residence. Unfortunately, this incident is far from isolated.

In my new book, I examine how race and racism continue to disadvantage those from black and minority ethnic backgrounds both in universities and wider society. By virtue of their racial identity, such groups are positioned as outsiders in a society which values and privileges whiteness.

In Britain, policies that attempt to be inclusive actually portray an image of a post-racial society, in which racial inequalities and racism no longer exist. In reality vast inequalities between white, black and minority ethnic communities continue to exist. They exist in the access to the labour market, in schools – and in higher education.

 

Source: Why a post-racial British society remains a myth – even in universities : The Conversation

Minister suggests the government will not halt attack on human rights


Unfortunately this Governments attitude and policy is taking the Thatcher directive to bring back ‘Victorian values‘, but are they values to be applauded, for were there not child labour, poor and workhouses, debtors prisons and many others.

Are the progressions of the 20th Century and the start of the 21st to be abandoned. Will we bring back poor and workhouses, debtors prisons and may be even child labour, will there still be free education for all children and the disabled and poor left to their own devices, while the rich elite gain all the benefits of life.

We have the Equality Act 2010, the Care Act 2014 and others but are these just bits of legal jargon, which when they come to be tested are not worth the papers they have produced.

Are they just bits of paper with no real significance, but giving all the non-elite a belief of a caring Government.

Are we now seeing the real true colour ‘Blue’, when previously there could have been a tinge of ‘Red’ now what does that produce, could it be purple, now what party does that create and do they still exist. Something with UK in their terminology, perhaps.

Is this what our recent forebears fought for in the wars of the 20th Century.

If so, is life really worth living for, are we not just producing for the wealthy elite, while fighting and working for a pittance.

Govt Newspeak

Minister suggests ‘realities of the world’ mean government will not halt attack on rights. The justice minister responsible for human rights appears to have dismissed calls for the government to do more to protect the social and economic rights of disabled people and other groups.

Dr Phillip Lee, a junior justice minister whose responsibilities include human rights, was speaking at the launch of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) new report detailing Britain’s progress in implementing the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

In a speech at the launch, he appeared to suggest that “the realities of the world” – including population growth, an ageing society, and mass migration – and “finite resources” meant the government could not afford to meet the report’s call for action on the rights laid out in the covenant. The covenant includes the rights to work, including safe and healthy working…

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Reasonable adjustments


With all the legislation which has been enacted previously Equality Act 2010 which replaced the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 and others you would have expected by now that all organisations should be aware of what is required and be prepared to engage with reasonable adjustments. By why am I not surprised that they are not doing so, is it ignorance (surely not a University) or utter disregard for the welfare of their students. No matter what it is this should not be occurring, especially with the costs incurred to undertake these courses.

You have created a contract to attend the courses within the University and they are breaking this contract by not recognising the reasonable adjustments they should be making.

Their feeble retorts to belittle you are a major concern in their ability to deliver any aspect regarding disability equality.

As course have to be paid for I feel because of their uncaring attitude you will be entitled to a refund of some or all of your course fees, but that will not help you with achieving your educational aims.

The University should be ashamed of their behaviour and should be named and shamed.

WindSweptChildOnAShootingStar

University is hard… that’s just the way it is.

I think you are just panicking because you have 3 assignments due in on the same day

Just a clash of personalities.

You just don’t like the subject, and therefore you are not engaged.

Getting you ready for the world of work.

If you pre-learn (self-study) then you may understand it wrong and then we will have to go back and (teach backwards) to find the point where you misunderstood…

Learning support agreements are not detailed enough —

Just some of the excuses I have heard because I chose to ask for help with my disability and study. Because I asked for assistance, asking for my needs to be accommodated. I feel very much like I am banging my head upon a wall, of people who either actively choose not to understand or maybe I am not expressing myself clearly enough…

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Legal advice concerns after government abandons search for new contractors | DisabledGo News and Blog


Lawyers and campaigners have raised fresh concerns about the government’s approach to providing legal advice to people who need help with discrimination and special educational needs (SEN) cases, after ministers abandoned efforts to award new contracts in those areas.

The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) had been seeking organisations to take on contracts to provide advice from 1 September on discrimination and education cases through the Civil Legal Advice (CLA) service.

But it has now announced that it has abandoned those efforts because there were not enough “compliant” bids from organisations seeking the new contracts.

There are now fears that the government’s difficulty in finding organisations willing to take on the CLA services from September could make it even harder for disabled people to secure the legal advice they need.

Following the passing of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act (LASPO) in 2013, it became possible to seek government-funded advice and assistance on discrimination and SEN issues only through the CLA telephone “gateway”.

But campaigners say the introduction of the telephone gateway has had a dramatic negative impact on the ability of disabled people – such as those with communication-related impairments, mental health conditions or learning difficulties – to access legal advice and support.

Jeanine Blamires, who gave evidence two years ago to the House of Lords Equality Act 2010 a

 

 

 

Source: Legal advice concerns after government abandons search for new contractors | DisabledGo News and Blog

Deaf chief executive wins right to challenge Access to Work cap in court | DisabledGo News and Blog


A Deaf chief executive has won the right to question the government’s “discriminatory” cap on Access to Work (AtW) payments in the high court, in the latest legal challenge to the Department for Work and Pensions’ (DWP) disability policy agenda.

David Buxton, chief executive of Action on Disability in London, is one of many British Sign Language (BSL)-users who have been hit by the imposition of the cap on payments made by the AtW scheme, which provides disabled people with funding to pay for some of the extra disability-related expenses they face at work.

Now the high court has ruled that Buxton’s legal challenge can go ahead, with his lawyers set to argue – under the Equality Act 2010 – that the cap breached the public sector equality duty and subjected him to indirect discrimination.

His judicial review case is being funded by the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

It comes just weeks after another legal challenge forced work and pensions ministers into a climbdown over new personal independence payment rules that were found by the high court to be unlawful and “blatantly discriminatory”.

And earlier this month, a terminally-ill man, TP, won permission for a judicial review of the financial impact of the introduction of universal credit on disabled people with high support needs, through the loss of the severe disability premium and enhanced disability premium.

Disability News Service reported last year how Buxton had been told that AtW would only provide him with enough support to pay for interpreters three days every week.

 

Source: Deaf chief executive wins right to challenge Access to Work cap in court | DisabledGo News and Blog

Home Office IT failure stalls disabled civil servant’s career, MPs hear | DisabledGo News and Blog


A disabled civil servant has told MPs how her career has stalled because of the failure of the IT systems in the Home Office to cope with the assistive technology she needs to do her job.

Jo-Ann Moran, a senior executive officer in the Office for Security and Counter-Terrorism, told the work and pensions select committee yesterday (Wednesday) that she had been encouraged to apply for promotion but declined to do so because of the IT problems she was facing.

She told the committee that it had been a “culture shock” to “all of a sudden be denied access” after 30 years of full-time employment.

Moran, who has a degenerative condition that affects her hearing and sight, said: “I am a top performer in my grade and I keep getting told, ‘Come on, go for it,’ but I can’t because I am just not going to be reliable.”

She added: “We just can’t get the assistive technology to work. It’s not through the [lack of] trying, it’s just about the infrastructure being able to cope with the additional technology.”

The evidence session was part of the committee’s inquiry into the role of assistive technology in improving disabled people’s employment rates.

Moran said she feared that if she applied for a job working for a minister, that minister would not be able to accommodate her if she had to say, ‘Sorry, my computer’s not working today.

Source: Home Office IT failure stalls disabled civil servant’s career, MPs hear | DisabledGo News and Blog