Trump cancels US cemetery visit amid diplomatic embarrassment | US news | The Guardian


Comment from 61chrissterry

Trump a President who thinks and feels more for his hair than the fallen at a site of immense importance to the US military.

What does the Trump base think of that and their apparent saviour?

Hopefully not much, but then again if they fail to believe in Trump, then who can they, what an impossible choice.

They need to get their priorities right America or Trump, they can’t have both.


As Donald Trump met Emmanuel Macron in Paris on Saturday, he was beset by potential diplomatic embarrassment.

First, the French newspaper Le Monde reported that on a previous diplomatic occasion in Washington, the American president caused embarrassment by mixing up the Baltic states and the Balkans.

Then, amidst ceremonies in the French capital to mark the 100th anniversary of the end of the first world war, a planned presidential visit to the American cemetery at Belleau, a site of immense importance to the US military, was cancelled because it was raining.

Amidst brewing international consternation, Trump was criticised in harsh terms by Winston Churchill’s grandson, Nicholas Soames, who tweeted: “They died with their face to the foe and that pathetic inadequate @realDonaldTrump couldn’t even defy the weather to pay his respects to The Fallen #hesnotfittorepresenthisgreatcountry.”

Nicolas Burns, an American diplomat who served both Republican and Democratic presidents, called that choice “astonishing”.

 

Source: Trump cancels US cemetery visit amid diplomatic embarrassment | US news | The Guardian

A Brexit alternative for the Cabinet today | Conservative Home


Is the below mentioned a reasonable alternative, has suggested, what are your views?

61chrissterry


The Cabinet meets this morning.  Its members will wonder whether No Deal is now inevitable.  Perhaps the EU is now so set on carving up our country in any settlement that a collapse of the talks cannot be avoided.  But there is a potential escape route.

The EU’s support for the backstop is only one of many problems in the wider negotiation.  These cluster around the Prime Minister’s Chequers scheme, which was unequivocally rejected at Salzburg last month.  As the EU sees it, Chequers, with its core proposal to harmonise goods but not services with EU regulation, would breach the four freedoms of movement of goods, services capital, and workers; threaten the unity of its internal market, and potentially undercut EU27 businesses.

Were the backstop to be reduced to the onlydifficulty in the talks, it is possible to imagine that the EU would move to resolve it.

This is what would happen were Theresa May to take up a solution that the EU itself has offered – namely a Canada-style settlement.  Donald Tusk proposed it last spring.  “It should come as no surprise that the only remaining possible model is a free trade agreement,” he wrote.  “I hope that it will be ambitious and advanced – and we will do our best, as we did with other partners, such as Canada recently – but anyway it will only be a trade agreement.  I propose that we aim for a trade agreement covering all sectors and with zero tariffs on goods. Like other free trade agreements, it should address services.”

 

Source: A Brexit alternative for the Cabinet today | Conservative Home

The Trial Against Catalan Political Prisoners Gets Closer


Josep Goded

The countdown to the trial against Catalan political prisoners has already begun. This week itself ended the deadline for the defenses to ask for the revocation of the instruction, which will surely be dismissed by the Second Chamber of the Supreme Court. Thereafter, the trial court can present its conclusions from the investigations and the opening of the trial can be decreed.However, the prisoners’ defense will seek to block it until their appeals are resolved.

The defense estimates that the trial will begin in January.And that this could last for about two months, just before the campaign for local and European elections begin.However, they suspect that the Supreme Court could intend to initiate the trial in November in order to take the defense by surprise and undermine their strategy.

Until now, the opening of the trial has been delayed because the defense has appealed the instructions of Judge Llarena and the provisional orders of imprisonment. The recusations…

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The France v Britain scallop war goes much deeper than Brexit with nets | John Lichfield | Opinion | The Guardian


Forty French fishing boats attack five British boats in the Channel. Stones and smoke bombs are thrown. Rude words are exchanged in two languages. The British retreat.

Similar incidents have been happening for 15 years – or arguably for the last 900 years. The rights and wrong are complicated. Yesterday evening the French boats were undoubtedly the aggressors. They put to sea not in order to fish, but to harass the English and Scottish boats that had entered “their waters”.

It was foolhardy of the French fishermen, but they do have reasons to be exasperated. The latest outbreak of the Baie de la Seine scallop war should be seen in the context of Brexit and the deep uncertainties and exaggerated expectations encouraged by simplistic and vague UK plans to reclaim “our seas” and “our fish”.

Ironies abound. In the this dispute, British boats are asserting their right to fish in French waters even when they are closed to French trawlers. This right depends on EU rules, but pre-dates the EU fishing policy.

In any case, the row is not just about France v Britain. It is also about Big Boats v Small Boats, and the ecological damage caused by modern methods of industrial-scale fishing.

First, some facts. The clashes took place in “French waters” – that is to say about 15 miles from the French coast at a point where the Channel is about 100 miles wide, well beyond any possible legal definition of British waters. There were 40 French boats and five British – but the French boats were tiny and the British boats were large.

Source: The France v Britain scallop war goes much deeper than Brexit with nets | John Lichfield | Opinion | The Guardian

A Guide To The Far-Right Power Players Tearing Europe Apart : Huffington Post


Elections across Europe this year have confirmed the surging popularity of far-right leaders.

While their liberal and conservative counterparts are in free fall, radical right parties are successfully exploiting public anxiety over migration, national identity and the failures of the establishment. After decades on the fringes, they’re forming governments, by themselves or in coalition.

“You’re seeing this very political, symbolic stand saying enough is enough,” said Natalia Banulescu-Bogdan, head of the international program at the Migration Policy Institute in Washington, D.C. “Those who believe that the system is not working are finding allies throughout Europe.”

These are some of the key leaders and parties seeking to reshape Europe in their own radical right image.

 

Source: A Guide To The Far-Right Power Players Tearing Europe Apart : Huffington Post

 

 

How many Muslim women actually wear the burka in the UK? It’s probably less than a few thousand – The i – Weekend Reads #55


Given the reaction of some parts of the media, one could be forgiven for assuming that Europe and the rest of the Western world has become besieged by burqa-clad women. The “fear” is now so rife that empty bus seats in Norway were mistaken for a group of women wearing the burqa.

Meanwhile, in a much derided stunt in Australia, far right leader Pauline Hanson wore a full-face covering burqa into the senate chamber. Hanson’s aim was to prohibit Muslim women from covering their faces and to get the burqa banned in the country.

To look at it, the burqa is simply a veil which covers the body and face – and yet it is also sometimes associated with oppression, terrorism, and extreme religious beliefs. Some burqas only have a mesh screen for the wearer to see through. The niqab, on the other hand, is a face veil worn with a headscarf which leaves the eyes uncovered, while the hijab is a scarf which covers the head and neck. In Europe, the term “burqa” is used to refer to women who wear robes to cover the body and face, but their eyes may be left uncovered, as seen in the main image of this article.

Source: How many Muslim women actually wear the burka in the UK? It’s probably less than a few thousand – The i – Weekend Reads #55

May’s Brexit plan raises UKIP from the dead | Conservative Home


Theresa May Mark One buried UKIP. Theresa May Mark Two is digging it up.  That is the only conclusion one can reasonably draw from today’s Opinium poll for the Observer, which shows Labour on 40 per cent, as last month, the Conservatives on 36 per cent, down six points, and UKIP on eight per cent, up five points.  The movement from the second to the third could scarcely be clearer.

That rise in support for what many will still think of, wrongly, as Nigel Farage’s party isn’t because of rebooted support for him.  Nor will voters be enamoured with the charms of Gerald Batten, of whom most of them will never have heard.  The driver of this result is plainly the Government’s new Brexit policy.

25 per cent of those polled approve of the way that the Prime Minister is handling Brexit, down from 30 per cent last month, while 56 per cent disapprove, up from 45 per cent last month.  Her net approval rating was minus eight per cent last month; it is 24 per cent this month.  The percentage of those who believe that Brexit is one of the most important issues facing the country is at its highest ever recorded by Opinium – 51 per cent this month (it was 42 per cent last month).  Overall, 32 per cent of those surveyed supported May’s Brexit plan and 31 per cent opposed it.

The EU referendum result killed UKIP.  After all, what was the point of supporting a party which aimed to make Britain independent once the British people had voted for precisely that?  The cause of Brexit was handed overnight to the governing party, which now had an instruction from the electorate to deliver it.  During the period between the referendum and last summer’s general election, Theresa May presented herself as the woman who would fulfil that mandate for “citizens of somewhere”: “Brexit means Brexit”.

Source: May’s Brexit plan raises UKIP from the dead | Conservative Home

May’s new Brexit plan. There is an alternative – from within the Government itself. | Conservative Home


The Cabinet was reportedly presented with a Treasury assessment of the impact of four outcomes to the Brexit talks: no deal, a Canadian-type deal, the EEA…and the Government’s own new scheme.  This itself should give pause for thought to the suggestion that, other than the EEA and no deal, there is no alternative to the plan agreed at Chequers.  It is a statement of the obvious that there will be as many of the last as there are people willing to propose them.

Far more to the point, however, there was one from within the Government itself – a proposal for it to seek “Canada Plus Plus Plus”, as David Davis once referred to it.  It is well known that DexEU was working on a draft of the White Paper that would outline this idea during the run-up to the Chequers meeting.  We are told that it went through some nine iterations.  The last ones were largely cuts for length.  None of them have been made public.  Until now.

Today, ConservativeHome publishes key extracts from a full draft of this White Paper.  They are not from one of the briefer final versions, but they set before our readers the main pillars of DexEU’s approach, which we are told were unchanged in any of those nine drafts.  As we write, we don’t have the advantage of also having seen the Government’s own White Paper, apparently to be published later, and thus the capacity to make comparisons between its text and that we publish today.

However, there will clearly be substantial overlap between the two – but, on the basis of the Government document published in the aftermath of Chequers, some key differences too.  A central one is the proposed regulatory treatment of manufactured goods.  In her Mansion House speech earlier this year, the Prime Minister referred in this context to “a comprehensive system of mutual recognition”.  She also set out in her Florence speech last year a three-basket approach to regulation.

“There will be areas which do affect our economic relations where we and our European friends may have different goals; or where we share the same goals but want to achieve them through different means.  And there will be areas where we want to achieve the same goals in the same ways, because it makes sense for our economies,” she said.  This was the approach agreed at the Chequers mee

 

Source: May’s new Brexit plan. There is an alternative – from within the Government itself. | Conservative Home

Brexit news: Brussels refuses UK military staff over ‘conflict of interest’ | UK | News | Express.co.uk


BRUSSELS has refused the help of the UK military after Brexit with British staff being told their current roles with the European Union will not continue after the UK leaves the bloc.

Currently, 13 British personnel have been assisting EU military staff as part of a secondment arrangement with Brussels, while another has been on loan to the crisis management and planning directorate of the European External Action Service

However they have now been told by Brussels will not have their roles with the EU automatically renewed after Brexit.

The Ministry of Defence said British secondments are now being considered by Brussels on a case-by-case basis in a bid to stop conflicts of interest in potentially sensitive areas.

But joint military missions could face issues after Brexit and a top British official urged negotiators to “find a way to keep the door open”.

Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart Peach, the chief of the UK defence staff, told the Financial Times: “At times like this the military to military relationships matter more than ever.

 

Source: Brexit news: Brussels refuses UK military staff over ‘conflict of interest’ | UK | News | Express.co.uk