EU membership has many benefits, but economic growth is not one of them – new findings : The Conversation


From Winston Churchill in the 1940s to the Nobel Peace Prize Committee in our era, peace and prosperity have always been put forward as the two main goals of European integration. The EU founding fathers saw the European project as a way of taming nationalist passions by serving mutual commercial interests: a common political and economic entity that would guarantee both peace and economic progress.

In his famous United States of Europe speech in Zürich on September 19, 1946, Churchill argued that “the sovereign remedy” to the plight of post-war Europe was “to recreate the European family, or as much of it as we can, and to provide it with a structure under which it can dwell in peace, in safety, and in freedom”.

 

Source: EU membership has many benefits, but economic growth is not one of them – new findings : The Conversation

ITALEXIT: Italy to CRASH OUT of Euro causing banking crisis in the EU claims economist | World | News | Express.co.uk


Mr Bootle also made a worrying prediction for the EU economy as a whole. He said: “As and when Italy finally blows up this will cause both a banking crisis that will shake the European economy and a political crisis that will rock the EU to its foundations.” It is now the third time Italy has fallen into recession in a decade. There has been a weakening of growth rates across the eurozone, which led to the EU increasing its GDP by only 0.2% in the final three months of 2018.

 

Source: ITALEXIT: : Italy to CRASH OUT of Euro causing banking crisis in the EU claims economist | World | News | Express.co.uk

Brexit is pushing the NHS to the brink. Time is running out to save it ǀ View | Euronews


Brexit’s infamous red bus was paraded up and down the UK, informing voters prior to the EU referendum that voting Leave would result in more money for our country’s cash-strapped National Health Service (NHS). Yet, since the fog lifted after 23 June 2016, it is becoming increasingly clear that the NHS may be worse off once we leave the European Union. A decline in the number of EU healthcare professionals coming to work in the country’s health system, uncertainty about medication supplies and a general anxiety about the future health of the NHS have alarm bells ringing up and down the British Isles.

The UK government’s mishandling of the situation has resulted in apprehension regarding the future functioning of the NHS. For a system that was already under pressure before the EU referendum vote, this is unacceptable. In fact, it is somewhat surprising that the government did not foresee this as being a potential consequence of a Leave result. Today, it is plain to see how this oversight and lack of forward planning will now cost the NHS and the people that use it every day.

 

Source: Brexit is pushing the NHS to the brink. Time is running out to save it ǀ View | Euronews

Rebel Labour MPs set to quit party and form centre group | Politics | The Guardian


A group of disaffected Labour MPs is preparing to quit the party and form a breakaway movement on the political centre ground amid growing discontent with Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership on Brexit and other key issues including immigration, foreign policy and antisemitism.

The Observer has been told by multiple sources that at least six MPs have been drawing up plans to resign the whip and leave the party soon. There have also been discussions involving senior figures about a potentially far larger group splitting off at some point after Brexit, if Corbyn fails to do everything possible to oppose Theresa May’s plans for taking the UK out of the EU.

On Saturday night, three of the MPs widely rumoured to be involved in the plans for an initial breakaway – Angela Smith, Chris Leslie and Luciana Berger – refused to be drawn into talk of a split, and insisted they were focused on opposing Brexit. But they did not deny that moves could be made by the spring or early summer.

 

Source: Rebel Labour MPs set to quit party and form centre group | Politics | The Guardian

Why freedom of movement is causing divisions – across Europe | Ines Wagner | Opinion | The Guardian


Freedom of movement for EU workers has been front and centre in the Brexit debate. Fear of foreign workers undercutting the wages and working conditions of locals helped to fuel the leave campaign. Now EU nationals – Poles and others – who have called Britain home for years, sometimes decades, face an uncertain future in the UK.

But while attitudes to migrant workers in Brexit Britain are often seen as a case apart, free movement of people evokes hostility in other EU countries too. The belief that foreigners take away jobs from local workers is – and has long been – a textbook example of false information. Research has proved again and again that the belief is ill-founded. Yet to some, it feels true no matter how many studies show that it is not.

 

Source: Why freedom of movement is causing divisions – across Europe | Ines Wagner | Opinion | The Guardian

Brexit News: EU leadership will dash Remainers’ second referendum hope with deadline | UK | News | Express.co.uk


The European Union looks set to stun Remainers who are hoping to delay Brexit and secure a second referendum by revealing a shock Brexit deadline. The EU ambassador to the US David O’Sullivan has revealed that the EU leadership want Brexit sorted once and for all before the end of May, when Europe votes for its MEPs. Remainers are hoping to extend Article 50 if Theresa May’s Brexit deal loses as expected in the House of Commons on Tuesday.

 

Source: Brexit News: EU leadership will dash Remainers’ second referendum hope with deadline | UK | News | Express.co.uk

Brexit true believers see only an upside to leaving the E.U. | Euronews


RAMSGATE, England — Stuart Piper is enthusiastically awaiting Britain’s looming departure from the European Union.

He is not alone in this corner of England. Nearly 64 percent of people in Thanet, the administrative district that includes the once-thriving port town of Ramsgate, supported leaving in the 2016 referendum.

Since then, both the government and experts have predicted that Brexit will result in the U.K. being worse off.

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The Bank of England has warned that a “disorderly” scenario — involving severe delays at U.K. borders and financial markets’ loss of confidence in British institutions — could shrink the British economy as much as 8 percent in about a year, with the value of the pound tumbling 25 percent, and house prices falling by 30 percent.

Food and medicine shortages are also possibilities if U.K. ports end up gridlocked due to customs checks being introduced, and the government has said 3,500 troops will be on standby to help deal with disruptions or civil unrest.

Britain will leave the 28-country bloc on March 29 — but with only 76 days to go, lawmakers are bitterly divided about the proposed divorce agreement, meaning a “no-deal” Brexit without any arrangement for future trade is the default option.

The country’s finance minister last year also warned that a split without a pact would cost Britain tens of billions of dollars — more than it currently contributes to the E.U.

However, the “no-deal” option would “please” or “delight” around 15 percent of people, according to recent YouGov polls.

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Many who support Brexit are anxious for the government to get on with it, no matter the cost.

“There is little doubt that this multicultural experiment has failed miserably,” said Piper, a local politician and former Baptist minister.

 

Source: Brexit true believers see only an upside to leaving the E.U. | Euronews

EU again rules out reworking Brexit deal | Reuters


BRUSSELS (Reuters) – The European Commission repeated on Monday that EU leaders would not renegotiate a Brexit treaty agreed last month with Prime Minister Theresa May and was pressing on with planning for Britain to crash out of the Union without a deal.

 

Source: EU again rules out reworking Brexit deal | Reuters

It’s not just Windrush. Britain’s immigration scandal will grow in 2019 | Satbir Singh | Opinion | The Guardian


Tasfin came to the UK in 1962 from Bangladesh, or what was then called East Pakistan. He was 19 years old. Orphaned during the brutal partition of India by the departing British, he had been working since the age of 12 for an American company in the port city of Chittagong. He made tea, unloaded containers, repaired cars and swept floors. And he eventually concluded that the only way to ensure a better life for himself was to scrape together the fare for a one-way ride to the Tilbury Docks. As a citizen of the Commonwealth, he enjoyed this right to move to the United Kingdom, as did all those now fondly referred to as the “Windrush generation”.

Now 84, Tasfin lives in Tooting, south London, with the eldest of his three sons, surrounded by grandchildren, the youngest of whom will be sitting her GCSEs in a few months’ time. After working for over 40 years on the London Underground, he retired a few months after his wife passed away and struggles with chronic arthritis.

We meet by chance on the No 44 bus and Tasfin, it turns out, is on his way to apply for his first passport. He proudly tells me, “Her Majesty’s Government wrote me a letter to say that I am now a British citizen.”

As with so many others, Tasfin’s journey to this point had started with a routine interaction with the state turning his entire life upside down. In this case it was a visit to an outpatient NHS service in late 2017, where he was asked to prove his immigration status. Having never had the means to travel, Tasfin had never possessed a passport. “My wife was better with paperwork but she had already quit and gone upstairs.” So this elderly man was swallowed whole by the hostile environment.

With no access to healthcare, Tasfin had no way of knowing that the pain in his legs was because of easily treatable blood clots, and he slowly stopped trying to walk at all. By last April there were letters arriving from the Home Office, threatening removal. “I didn’t leave my house or even open the curtains, I was so scared that they would snatch me and take me away”.

Tasfin tells me that he had read about the Windrush scandal in his newspaper and seen it on TV. But “I didn’t come from the Caribbean so I didn’t think it was the same thing”, says Tasfin. It was months before a lawyer attending his mosque heard about Tasfin’s problems and helped him call the Windrush Taskforce. “Alhamdulillah [praise be to God] he said something or I might not be here.”

 

Source: It’s not just Windrush. Britain’s immigration scandal will grow in 2019 | Satbir Singh | Opinion | The Guardian

EU SHOCK PREDICTION: Eurozone will BREAK UP in 2019 amid national turmoil, experts warn | World | News | Express.co.uk


Desperate times lie ahead for the Eurozone as economic growth slows, particularly in countries such as Italy where debt levels are already astronomically high at £2.2trillion. The Centre for Economic and Business Research said in its annual predictions for 2019 “internal contradictions” would force the Eurozone to “integrate economically” or “risk breaking up”. They added: “It is possible to defer the confrontation for a year or two but the boil will have to be lanced at some point since the Italians have clearly reached the point of austerity fatigue.”

 

Source: EU SHOCK PREDICTION: Eurozone will BREAK UP in 2019 amid national turmoil, experts warn | World | News | Express.co.uk