Trump Again Calls For Changing Libel Laws After NYU Professor’s Faked Quote [Updated] | JONATHAN TURLEY


President Donald Trump has previously — and unwisely — called for changing libel laws to combat what he calls “fake news.” I have previously criticized  Trump for his calls for greater liability of the media for its coverage of the controversies surrounding his Administration, including his desire to sue Saturday Night Live.  Now, due to the publication of a false quote from Trump by New York University Professor Ian Bremmer, Trump is again calling for a change in the law and ignoring that our defamation standard is anchored in the first amendment. Ironically, Trump himself was recently accused of posting a doctored clip of Nancy Pelosi and has repeatedly retweeted false or defamatory statements.

Bremmer peached “professional studies” at NYU and is the founder of the Eurasia Group, a political risk research and consulting firm. For some reason, Bremmer decided to post a false quote from Trump: “Kim Jong Un is smarter and would make a better President than Sleepy Joe Biden.”

 

Source: Trump Again Calls For Changing Libel Laws After NYU Professor’s Faked Quote [Updated] | JONATHAN TURLEY

Journalism’s Assange problem : THe Conversation


These days, anybody with an internet connection can be a publisher.

That doesn’t make everybody a journalist.

This distinction has become more important than ever in light of two recent events.

One was the arrest of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. The other was a proposal by lawmakers from Georgia, the Peach State, that looked more like an export from the Georgia that was part of the Soviet Union: a so-called “ethics in journalism” act that would have imposed onerous new requirements and potential civil penalties on reporters.

As soon as news broke of Assange’s potential extradition to the United States for trial on charges of conspiracy, his allies began campaigning to make him a Fourth Estate martyr.

“Every journalist in the world” should be speaking out on Assange’s behalf, said Intercept editor Glenn Greenwald. Another fugitive leaker of U.S. government secrets, Edward Snowden, tweeted that Assange’s arrest represents “a dark day for press freedom.”

As two journalism professors who practiced the craft for many years before becoming teachers of it, we know firsthand how powerfully reporters are drawn to unpopular causes. It’s an admirable reflex that often makes for great journalism and a better society.

But granting Assange journalist status is beyond problematic: It’s likely to draw more attacks on press freedom such as the Georgia lawmakers’ thinly disguised attempt to sanction and ostracize journalists whose work they don’t like.

 

Source: Journalism’s Assange problem  : The Conversation

White House threatening to again pull Acosta press credentials : CNN | TheHill


The White House is threatening to again pull CNN correspondent Jim Acosta’s press credentials after a court-ordered temporary restoration expires at the end of the month, the network reported late Sunday.

“Friday’s court ruling means that a temporary restraining order is in effect for 14 days. But [White House] officials sent Acosta a letter stating that his press pass is set to be suspended again once the restraining order expires,” reported CNN senior media correspondent Brian Stelter.

CNN argued in a statement provided to Stelter that the action would threaten “all journalists and news organizations.”

“The White House is continuing to violate the First and 5th Amendments of the Constitution,” the network stated. “These actions threaten all journalists and news organizations. Jim Acosta and CNN will continue to report the news about the White House and the President.”

The Hill has reached out to the White House, which pulled Acosta’s press credentials after a contentious exchange with President Trump during a news conference in which he refused to yield the microphone, for comment.

CNN on Monday requested an emergency hearing in U.S. District Court to address the White House’s plan to again pull the credentials.

U.S. District Judge Timothy Kelly last Friday granted CNN’s request to restore Acosta’s hard press pass through a 14-day temporary injunction that expires on Nov. 30.

The ruling was limited, however, with Kelly stating that only Acosta’s Fifth Amendment rights to due process were violated. The judge, who was appointed by Trump, did not issue a ruling on whether the correspondent’s First Amendment rights were violated.

 

Source: White House threatening to again pull Acosta press credentials: CNN | TheHill