If Germany atoned for the Holocaust, the US can pay reparations for slavery


The idea of paying reparations for slavery is gaining momentum in the United States, despite being long derided as an unrealistic plan, to compensate for state violence committed by and against people long dead.

The topic saw substantive debate in the July 30 Democratic primary debate, with candidate Marianne Williamson calling slavery “a debt that is owed.” Some Democratic congressional representatives are also pushing for financial recompense for the descendants of enslaved people.

Calls for reparations in the U.S. are generally met with skepticism: What would reparations achieve? Who should receive them, and under what conditions?

Other countries have tackled these questions. In 1995, South Africa established its Truth and Reconciliation Commission and paid reparations to the victims of apartheid. Eight years before, the United States apologized to 82,000 Japanese Americans unduly imprisoned during World War II and paid them US$20,000 each to compensate for their suffering.

Even Germany, birthplace of the worst racism ever institutionalized and elevated to official policy, has some lessons for the United States as it considers reparations.

Compensating victims of Nazi enslavement

I am a professor of political science who studies the relationship between democracy, citizenship and justice. My recent work on Germany examines how the country dealt with the horrors of the Holocaust.

Nazi Germany not only killed millions of Jews between 1933 and 1945. It also forced over 20 million people into slave labor, working them to their death in German industries. By 1944, a quarter of the German workforce was enslaved laborers.

 

Source: If Germany atoned for the Holocaust, the US can pay reparations for slavery

If Germany atoned for the Holocaust, the US can pay reparations for slavery : The Conversation


The idea of paying reparations for slavery is gaining momentum in the United States, despite being long derided as an unrealistic plan, to compensate for state violence committed by and against people long dead.

The topic saw substantive debate in the July 30 Democratic primary debate, with candidate Marianne Williamson calling slavery “a debt that is owed.” Some Democratic congressional representatives are also pushing for financial recompense for the descendants of enslaved people.

Calls for reparations in the U.S. are generally met with skepticism: What would reparations achieve? Who should receive them, and under what conditions?

Other countries have tackled these questions. In 1995, South Africa established its Truth and Reconciliation Commission and paid reparations to the victims of apartheid. Eight years before, the United States apologized to 82,000 Japanese Americans unduly imprisoned during World War II and paid them US$20,000 each to compensate for their suffering.

Even Germany, birthplace of the worst racism ever institutionalized and elevated to official policy, has some lessons for the United States as it considers reparations.

Compensating victims of Nazi enslavement

I am a professor of political science who studies the relationship between democracy, citizenship and justice. My recent work on Germany examines how the country dealt with the horrors of the Holocaust.

Nazi Germany not only killed millions of Jews between 1933 and 1945. It also forced over 20 million people into slave labor, working them to their death in German industries. By 1944, a quarter of the German workforce was enslaved laborers.

 

Source: If Germany atoned for the Holocaust, the US can pay reparations for slavery : The Conversation

Tackling modern slavery #TheCoopWay


Today is national Anti-Slavery Day. Why does slavery need its own day? Well in the UK modern slavery is a rapidly growing criminal activity but we’re only just beginning to understand the scale of the crimes being committed. The National Crime Agency estimate that there are over 10,000 potential victims of slavery in the UK right now, with potential victims recorded in 2016 coming from 108 different countries.

So let me tell you something about modern slavery, what we’re doing as the Co-op, and how you can help too.

Vulnerable

Slavery is the second biggest illegal trade in the world and it preys on the most vulnerable men, women and children destroying their lives by trapping them in crime, domestic slavery, the sex trade or forced labour. Figures show that 1 in 4 victims are children, whilst up to 34% of victims of slavery go on to be re-trafficked.

You can find out more at http://www.antislavery.org

Co-op Blog

586 words, approx. 2.5 minutes to read.

Today is national Anti-Slavery Day. Why does slavery need its own day? Well in the UK modern slavery is a rapidly growing criminal activity but we’re only just beginning to understand the scale of the crimes being committed. The National Crime Agency estimate that there are over 10,000 potential victims of slavery in the UK right now, with potential victims recorded in 2016 coming from 108 different countries.

So let me tell you something about modern slavery, what we’re doing as the Co-op, and how you can help too.

Vulnerable

Slavery is the second biggest illegal trade in the world and it preys on the most vulnerable men, women and children destroying their lives by trapping them in crime, domestic slavery, the sex trade or forced labour. Figures show that 1 in 4 victims are children, whilst up to 34% of victims…

View original post 456 more words

Modern Slavery needs Modern Laws


84 years ago Charlie Chaplin was at the height of his career, 84 years ago the very notion of a computer or instant coffee was pure science fiction. 84 years ago forced labour was still legal in at least 20 countries1 and an international law2 was established to end this horrific practice.

But the world has changed since then. Now 84 years later, we finally have a chance to update this law to protect against today’s slavery.

Just days ago the International Labour Organisation released two options3 to update this law, but only one will work. In just a few weeks every country will have a choice between weak, unenforceable guidelines and a strong new law.

Call on your government to vote for strong protections from modern slavery.

[1] Jean Goudal, May 1929, The question of forced labour before the international labour conference, International Labour Review, Vol. XIX. No. 5.
[2] http://bit.ly/RiCP3Z
[3] http://bit.ly/1htlnQB