Should patients own their health records? | The BMJ


It’s my body and my health so why can’t I be the legal owner of my medical record? This important question was debated during a series of webinars run by The BMJ on patient access to medical records.1 Most of those involved agreed that we should be able to access all data that’s held on us, including our full medical records, but the ownership question was more contentious.

Many webinar participants saw record ownership as key to rebalancing healthcare in a more person centred direction, empowering patients to take more control of their health and data. They argued that ownership would deliver benefits in terms of the ability to control access, to check and correct errors, to record health goals and concerns, and to monitor usage through an electronic audit trail.

Others asserted that most people don’t want the responsibility of holding, managing, and maintaining their records, as long as they can access them when they need to. Some felt that defining ownership of electronic data are impossible anyway and must not be used as a ploy to derail patient access to their records, which is more important.

Patients in the UK have had a right to view, but …

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Yes, I want to see my health records not at a specific time, but as and when I wish to, so I have requested access with my GP practice, to be told access is not currently available due to safeguarding reasons. What the specific safeguarding reasons are I have not been told and no likely date when access will be granted, this I feel is an unreasonable situation, so ownership is a prime concern to me.

Is it my safeguarding or the practice.

Surely there is an infringement of my Human Rights and if it is not, it should be.

 

Source: Should patients own their health records? | The BMJ

NICE seeks to improve autistic people’s health and wellbeing – NAS


A new recommendation from NICE (the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence) seeks to improve autistic people’s experiences of GP services in England.

Source: NICE seeks to improve autistic people’s health and wellbeing – NAS

Seven-day NHS plan puts weekday surgeries at risk, warns top GP : Welfare Weekly.


Of course this 7-Day NHS is unrealistic especially for GPs, as because of reduced funding my own GP practice, although open for 5 weekdays it is in effect only open for 4 days in total, as on Tuesdays and Thursday the practice closes at 12 noon.

There are already insufficient GPs throughout the country and some areas are worse than others.

So, in effect, it is both lack of funding and insufficient trained GPs, while some are taking early retirement due to the pressures they are already experiencing.

Senior GP Helen Stokes-Lampard voices fears for services | DisabledGo News and Blog


Britain’s leading GP says she is “profoundly concerned” about how doctors will cope with demand over the busy winter period. Helen Stokes-Lampard, chair of the Royal College of GPs Council, said general practice was “skating on thin ice”, warning: “Something has to give”. Some people wait weeks to see a doctor, with potentially serious results, the Staffordshire-based GP said. NHS England said GPs would be getting extra funding to extend services. ‘The big fear’ Dr Stokes-Lampard told the Press Association some patients were already waiting two or three weeks to see GPs for non-urgent matters such as suspect lumps or bleeding problems. But if they wait three to four weeks “the non-urgent stuff may be becoming urgent,” she added. “With lumps or bleeding problems or things that could be signs of serious disease, my profound concern is that people will delay seeking help for things that could potentially be life-threatening or life-changing if they are not tackled swiftly. She went on:

Source: Senior GP Helen Stokes-Lampard voices fears for services | DisabledGo News and Blog

Protesters pledge to fight on against GP link-up with work advisors | DisabledGo News and Blog


Disabled activists have pledged to continue the fight to halt a scheme that places welfare-to-work advisors from a discredited US outsourcing giant in GP practices. They spoke out after a protest by scores of activists blocked a busy central London roundabout for half an hour on Friday afternoon, bringing traffic to a standstill. The protest at the roundabout at the junction of City Road and Old Street was organised by the Mental Health Resistance Network (MHRN), Disabled People Against Cuts (DPAC) and the mainstream grassroots protest group Boycott Workfare, and included supportive healthcare professionals. They were protesting about a scheme under which six surgeries in Islington, north London, are taking part in a year-long pilot scheme run and funded by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and Islington council. Under the Working Better scheme, job coaches employed by Remploy – now mostly owned by the US company Maximus – are placed in GP surgeries for one day a week.

Source: Protesters pledge to fight on against GP link-up with work advisors | DisabledGo News and Blog