House of Lords report urges government for clarity on EU healthcare deal | Care Industry News


The House of Lords EU Committee has today published its report Brexit: reciprocal healthcare. The Committee warns that in the absence of an agreement on reciprocal healthcare, the rights of UK citizens to hold an EHIC card for treatment in the EU will cease after Brexit.

Other rights, provided for by the S2 scheme and Patients’ Rights Directive, will likewise come to an end. Without EHIC or an equivalent arrangement it could become much more expensive for UK citizens with chronic conditions – such as dialysis patients and people living with rare diseases – to travel to the EU post-Brexit, for holidays, recuperation or treatment. These people might find it difficult to obtain travel insurance at all.

The Government wishes to maintain reciprocal healthcare arrangements including the EHIC scheme after Brexit, but the current arrangements are designed to support the freedom of movement of EU citizens. The Government intends to stop freedom of movement to the UK, and has not yet set out its objectives for the future UK-EU relationship. The Committee therefore urges the Government to confirm how it will seek to protect reciprocal rights to healthcare of all UK and EU citizens post-Brexit, as part of any agreement on future relations.

The report also argues that it is essential for EU citizens lawfully resident in the UK to have a continuing right to access long-term healthcare, as well as the practical means by which to exercise that right. The Committee therefore calls on the Government to use domestic legislation to clarify the means by which all EU citizens lawfully resident in the UK at the time of Brexit will be able to continue to access essential healthcare.

 

Source: House of Lords report urges government for clarity on EU healthcare deal | Care Industry News

The PIP Files: Data shows multiple complaints made against scores of Atos assessors | DisabledGo News and Blog


Scores of healthcare professionals may have been able to continue carrying out disability benefit assessments despite being the subject of multiple complaints about their behaviour, competence and honesty, confidential new documents have revealed.

The official reports, prepared by outsourcing giants Capita and Atos for the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), show that up to 180 personal independence payment (PIP) assessors were the subject of at least four complaints each in three-month periods in 2016.

The documents, released under the Freedom of Information Act, show that 161 assessors working for Atos had more than three complaints made against them in a three-month period.

And 19 Capita assessors were also subjected to at least four complaints in a three-month period in 2016.

Neither Atos nor Capita, nor DWP, will say what action was taken against these assessors and whether they are still carrying out face-to-face assessments of disabled PIP claimants.

The revelations provide fresh evidence of failings by the two private sector outsourcing giants in delivering PIP assessments across England, Wales and Scotland.

Disability News Service (DNS) has been investigating claims of widespread dishonesty by PIP assessors for more than a year, and has now heard from about 300 claimants who say their assessment reports contained clear lies.

The new reports include details of the “management information”

 

Source: The PIP Files: Data shows multiple complaints made against scores of Atos assessors | DisabledGo News and Blog

Autism patients: GPs in England urged to keep register | DisabledGo News and Blog


GPs in England are being encouraged to keep a register of patients with autism in order to improve the care they receive. Health chiefs say a register would alert GPs to the specific needs of adults and children with autism and help tailor services for them. The National Autistic Society said it would “help improve the health and wellbeing of autistic people”. But getting a quick diagnosis was still an issue, a child autism charity said. Autism is a lifelong, developmental disability that affects how a person communicates with and relates to other people, and how they experience the world around them. GPs in England already keep a register of patients with learning disabilities, and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence thinks patients with autism should be easily identified by healthcare professionals too. NICE says a register – which would be anonymous outside a patient’s surgery – would help staff to adapt their approach to suit patients’ needs. For example, doctors

Source: Autism patients: GPs in England urged to keep register | DisabledGo News and Blog

Is is autism? Is it something else? Or is it all Mum’s fault? | Yvonne Newbold


What happens when you think your child might have a disability of some sort, and you approach the relevant healthcare professionals for help and support? It would be nice to think that families in …

Source: Is is autism? Is it something else? Or is it all Mum’s fault? | Yvonne Newbold