CQC campaign calls on public to shape future of social care : Care Home Professional


The Care Quality Commission and Healthwatch England have launched a new campaign that calls on the public to help shape the future of health and social care.

Source: CQC campaign calls on public to shape future of social care : Care Home Professional

 

 

 

Healthwatch England reveals top health and care priorities for 2019 | Care Industry News


To mark the start of 2019, Healthwatch England has published their annual network priorities list – setting out the key health and care topics their local teams will be working on over the year ahead.

Over the last year Healthwatch engaged with over 400,000 people about their experiences of care.

Drawing on the wealth of qualitative data they collect, and through additional activities such as high-street surveys and townhall events, each local Healthwatch works with their community to set out a number of priorities for their area.

Healthwatch England has analysed 139 of these local plans and compiled a national list of the top issues.

The top five priorities for 2019 are:
• Primary care (including access to GPs) – 64
• Children and young people – 57
• Mental health – 50
• Services working better together – 49
• Adult social care, including residential care homes or care at home – 41

The projects undertaken by Healthwatch will build on the day-to-day activities of the network visiting hospital, GPs and care homes etc. and engaging with local people at events and in public spaces to gather their views.

At a national level they will look to use the combined findings to provide insight for decision makers across the NHS, social care sector and Whitehall about the sorts of improvements people want to see.

To do this they need the support of local people. They need more willing individuals to join their 5,000 volunteers and help smash last year’s recording breaking efforts – which saw an increase the number of experiences collected by an impressive 19%.

They also need more people to come forward and share their experiences and ideas , and help to reach their goal of hearing from more than one million people a year.

Focus on primary care

With the vast majority of people’s experiences of the NHS coming through their GP, it is not surprising to see it top this year’s list. And whilst problems getting an appointment is a common issue, it’s by no means the only thing people feedback about.

Online booking systems for example. Previous research by Healthwatch has shown that this the direction they want primary care to go in, but they want it to go further. They want to be able to book appointments with a variety of primary care professionals, from practice nurses to pharmacists, not just the GP.

 

Source: Healthwatch England reveals top health and care priorities for 2019 | Care Industry News

Ageing population brings social care to breaking point | Care Industry News


Responding to Healthwatch England’s report into Social Care and carers, Cllr Ian Hudspeth, Chairman of the Local Government Association’s Community Wellbeing Board, said:

“With people living longer, increases in costs and decreases in funding, adult social care is at breaking point.

“Over recent years, councils have protected adult social care relative to other services. But the scale of the overall funding picture for local government means adult social care services still face a £3.5 billion funding gap by 2025, just to maintain existing standards. The likely consequences of this are more and more people being unable to get quality and reliable care and support, which enables them to live the lives they want to lead.

“Unpaid carers are the backbone of the care system, many of whom are unable to take a break, putting their own health on the line. Without these unsung heroes the system would collapse.

 

 

Source: Ageing population brings social care to breaking point | Care Industry News

Hospitals show ‘shocking’ lack of care discharging vulnerable patients


Original post from The Guardian

‘……………By 

Healthwatch England report cites examples of stroke victim released with family unaware and suicidal man sent home against his wishes who later killed himself

Healthwatch says it has heard thousands of shocking stories concerning the discharge of patients. Photograph: Oli Scarff/Getty Images
Healthwatch says it has heard thousands of shocking stories concerning the discharge of patients. Photograph: Oli Scarff/Getty Images

“Shocking” lack of care for vulnerable people discharged unsafely from hospital has been condemned by the state-funded “consumer champion” Healthwatch England.

Common basic failings identified in its report included hospitals not routinely asking patients if they have a home or safe place to be discharged to, details of new medications not being passed on to GPs and carers, and the failure to notify families when relatives were discharged.

The report – Safely Home: what happens when people leave hospital and care settings? – covered the experience of more than 3,000 patients, either older, homeless or with mental health problems. These included the story of a man being discharged from care after a suicide attempt despite his pleas to stay, who killed himself a week later.

Other examples involved an 81-year-old man who had suffered a third severe stroke being discharged from hospital via taxi at 10.30pm without his family being notified, and a young mother being kept in hospital, away from her daughter, because health and social services could not agree on the funding of her care.

Healthwatch’s concerns were first revealed by the Guardian in January. Anna Bradley, the organisation’s chair, said on Monday that it had heard thousands of shocking stories about what happened when people left had hospital without the right planning and support.

“There is a huge human and financial cost of getting discharge wrong. We hope that the increased focus on integration of health and social care, and pressure on finances, will create a new impetus to fix it.”

Bradley added: “Whether it is about properly helping new mums at risk with depression, or making sure the patients receiving end-of-life care are given the support they need to spend their final days at home with their loved ones rather than in hospital, everyone should experience a safe, dignified and well-planned transfer of care.”

Peter Carter, chief executive and general secretary of the Royal College of Nursing, said: “Sadly, this will not come as a surprise to nursing staff, who all too often discharge a healthy patient only to see them return to hospital with complications caused by a lack of community care and support.”

Carter, blaming “systemic problems caused by increasingly fragmented services”, added: “With the right support in the community and properly resourced staff, who can be responsible for coordinating discharge, patients are less likely to return to hospital, relieving the pressures on the frontline”.

A Department of Health spokesperson said: “Care for the most vulnerable people is improving, including coordinating care for at-risk patients discharged from hospital. We have published a guide to help spread best practice and our £5.3bn Better Care Fund is getting local councils and NHS services working together more effectively to make sure people are properly supported when they leave hospital.

“But this report shows that we need to do more and we’re working with Healthwatch England, the NHS and others to improve further.”

The Health Service Ombudsman, Julie Mellor, said: “When patients are discharged unsafely from hospital it can have a devastating impact on them and their families.

“Our own casework shows that we still see too many complaints about failures in the discharge process. This report … adds further weight to our own view that there is still a way to go for the NHS and social care services to plug the gaps in their services to help achieve integrated, joined-up care for patients.”

NHS England said: “It’s important that patients who are well enough to leave hospital can do so at the earliest opportunity and are treated with dignity and compassion. However, we also need to ensure appropriate care is put in place before a patient leaves hospital, which needs strong joint working across the health service. While this can cause delays, it’s clearly better for patients and prevents a revolving door scenario that places greater pressure on the NHS.”  ………………’

 

Knowing the signs of cancer could save your life


Original post from NHS Choices

‘…..Be Clear on Cancer

Learn more about our campaigns

GP’s advice

If you spot any signs of cancer, go to your doctor to get it checked out. You’re not wasting anyone’s time, and if it isn’t serious, your mind will be put at rest. But if it is cancer, early diagnosis can make all the difference. The sooner cancer is detected, the better the chances of successful treatment.

Bladder and kidney cancer                  Bladder and kidney cancer

Prostate cancer                  Prostate cancer
Skin cancer                  Skin cancer
Oesophago-gastric cancers                 Oesophago-gastric cancers
Breast cancer in over 70s                 Breast cancer in over 70s
Ovarian cancer                 Ovarian cancer
Bowel cancer                 Bowel cancer

Lung cancer                 Lung cancer

About The NHS
The NHS Constitution………..’
GP’s advice

If you spot any signs of cancer, go to your doctor to get it checked out. You’re not wasting anyone’s time, and if it isn’t serious, your mind will be put at rest. But if it is cancer, early diagnosis can make all the difference. The sooner cancer is detected, the better the chances of successful treatment.

Bladder and kidney cancer

If you notice blood in your pee, even if it’s ‘just the once’, tell your doctor.

Learn more about bladder and kidney cancer

Prostate cancer

If you’re a black man over 45 and want to discuss your personal risk of prostate cancer, visit your doctor.

Learn more about prostate cancer

Oesophago-gastric cancers

Heartburn most days for three weeks or more? Tell your doctor.

Learn more about oesophago-gastric cancers  ……………….’