Archives for posts with tag: High-Functioning Autism

Young people with High-Functioning Autism (HFA) and Asperger’s (AS) usually want to fit-in and have relationships with friends and classmates, but they just don’t know how to do so effectively. They lack an understanding of conventional social rules and often “appear” to lack empathy. In order to improve socialization, these “special needs” kids need to learn and focus on socialization from an “intellectual” standpoint. Things that come naturally for children without autism need concentration by those with it.
The ability to navigate everyday social interactions presents significant challenges for kids on the autism spectrum. Social situations that present difficulties can range from the fairly simple (e.g., engaging in a conversation with a peer) to the extremely complex (e.g., determining whether a peer who seems friendly is actually harmful in some way).
Examples of important social skills to be taught to HFA and AS children include (but are not limited to):

 

 

Source: My Aspergers Child: Helping Kids on the Autism Spectrum to “Fit-In” with Their Peer Group


“My 10 year-old child with high-functioning autism is very smart, but he is very, very poorly coordinated. He has difficulty riding his bike, bowling, catching, hitting a tennis ball, kicking, shooting a basketball, diving in a pool, swinging a bat, and throwing. He can’t run fast without tripping, and he has terrible posture. As an infant, he was a later walker (almost 17 months). He was a very sloppy eater, and still has trouble cutting with a knife or the edge of his fork. Also, he had some speech articulation issues. We were hoping he would grow out of all this, but he hasn’t. I wonder if there is anything we could do to help him be less awkward. Does what I’ve described sound “normal” for some children with autism? Or does it sound concerning? How physically uncoordinated should he be before we try to get professional help for him?”

Many children with High-Functioning Autism (HFA) and Asperger’s (AS) have a comorbid condition called Hypotonia, which is sometimes referred to as “floppiness.” This is because the muscles are meant to help support the skeletal system and are designed to prevent certain kinds of motion. Because the muscles are not especially tight, children with Hypotonia frequently experience “hypermobility” (i.e., the ability to move limbs into awkward positions). They often find that they’re able to very easily carry out feats that require flexibility, but not strength or balance (e.g., splits, back-bending, shoulder rotation, etc.). Also, they may display uncommon flexibility in other joints (e.g., fingers).

 

Source: My Aspergers Child: Hypotonia in Kids on the Autism Spectrum


Source: My Aspergers Child: Understanding the “Easily Annoyed” Child on the Autism Spectrum


There should more acceptance of others, for then the world would be a better place.

WindSweptChildOnAShootingStar

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I was reading the wonderful post  Autistic Confessions – Stimming at Work — Anonymously Autistic  ( I have posted it a little before this.)

It brought to mind things for me that I thought I would share.

Firstly, I should explain to you what stimming is. The word ” stimming ” is short for self-stimulatory behaviour and stimming can be  flapping, rocking, spinning, squeezing, biting, chewing, picking, pacing,shaking legs and so much more. Stimming is used to manage anxiety, stress, anger, to help deal with overwhelming situations, or just for comfort.

I grew up not knowing I was Autistic, when I used to rock, as rocking from side to side is my way of stimming, I was told  ” don’t rock !” When I asked why ?  I was told that,  ” crazy people rock and you don’t want people to think you are crazy !” – whilst I can…

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We are all different so why should one person react the same as another, why not accept and respect a person for who there are, not how others wish them to be.

Bear this in mind and you and your son will come through.

ourownnormal

He’s 6, he has beautiful big brown eyes, a head full of lushious dark hair and Gorgeous olive skin.

He’s an amazing reader, fabulous at puzzles, he can name the actors names of any marvel character and knows anything there is to know about super powers.

He’s tidy, smart, sweet and particular.

By the age of two he knew all his colours, shapes, how to work the iPad, the apps and how to navigate round them better than I do now.

He can be loving, so loving, caring and thoughtful and so intelligent in his chosen fields.

I never realised as he was my first child, all the things he didn’t do. He didn’t wave goodbye, he didn’t like cuddles and he was always on the go. I just thought he didn’t like goodbyes, that he wasn’t an overly affectionate child and that he was ‘just a boy’. I was…

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Source: My Aspergers Child: Is a Formal “Diagnosis” of Asperger’s Helpful or Harmful?


Source: My Aspergers Child: Behavioral Interventions for Children with Asperger’s and High-Functioning Autism


Source: My Aspergers Child: Explaining the “Hidden Curriculum” to Children on the Autism Spectrum


Seventh Voice

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How many of us shudder each and every time there’s “breaking news” of some lone teenager somewhere, (almost always a male), reported to have gone on a shooting rampage, just knowing that sooner or later the initial shock of the rampage will turn to the tried, but oh so rarely true speculation, that the lone teenage gunman in question, has Asperger’s Syndrome?

I know that I sit and cringe, firstly for the harm inflicted, and secondly for the offensive accusations that cause the fear and mistrust of all individuals with Asperger’s which inevitably accompany each and every report of this kind.

And frankly, I’m baffled by the media’s constantly misaligned assertions as there seems to be  no genuine link between Asperger’s Syndrome, in either men or women, and a propensity towards violence.

There is however a genuine link to be made between those individuals who experience sociopathy and a propensity…

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Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) present, it’s no surprise that kids and teens diagnosed with Asperger’s (AS) and High-Functioning Autism (HFA)

Source: My Aspergers Child: Behavioral, Emotional and Cognitive Traits of Kids on the Autism Spectrum

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