Archives for posts with tag: High-Functioning Autism

Dwarren57's Blog

My double minority life as a gay man with Autism Spectrum Disorder (Asperger’s Syndrome) has more than it’s fair share of excruciating challenges. I do not demand people to feel sorry for me when I share even the most painful experiences. Not everyone is going to understand how it feels to live with my condition. Nor do I expect praise from people who are willing to read about my life. It can be easy for me to come off as such a person. However, I know I am far from the type of person who demands metals and trophies just for writing about my life. Demanding praise and adoration is only going to result in the exact opposite. 

I know there is a lot of diversity in the Autism community. People like Dr. Temple Grandin refer to Autism as a continuum, that ranges from nonverbal to traits that are more…

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The new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) now refers to Asperger syndrome as “Level 1 Autism,” also informally called “high-functioning autism” (HFA). However, this only applies to the U.S. In the rest of the world, the disorder is still referred to as Asperger syndrome. So, I will be using these two terms interchangeably, because they are fundamentally the same disorder with two different names. Having said that…

“Parenting Children and Teens with Asperger’s and High-Functioning Autism” is a 4-part downloadable eBook (along with audio instruction) designed to help parents of Asperger’s and High-Functioning Autistic kids who are experiencing behavioral difficulties. The program contains prevention, identification, and intervention strategies for the most destructive of autism-related behaviors.
Although Asperger’s is at the milder end of the autism spectrum (i.e., high-functioning autism), the challenges parents face when raising a child on the autism spectrum are more difficult than they would be with an “average” child. Complicated by problematic behavior, the Asperger’s or HFA child is at risk for even greater difficulties on multiple levels, unless the parents’ disciplinary techniques are tailored to their child’s special needs.
The standard disciplinary techniques that are recommended for “typical” children and teens do not take into account the many issues facing a youngster with a neurological disorder. Meltdowns, shutdowns, aggression, sensory sensitivities, self-injury, isolation-seeking, and communication problems that arise due to auditory and sensory issues are just some of the behaviors that parents of these young people will have to learn to control.
Parents need to come up with a consistent parenting plan ahead of time, and then present a united front and continually review their strategies for potential changes and improvements as the Asperger’s or HFA child develops and matures.
Kids on the autism spectrum possess a unique set of attitudes and behaviors:
Social Skills— Social conventions are a confusing maze

 

 

Source: My Aspergers Child: Parenting System that Reduces Problematic Behavior in Children with Asperger’s and High-Functioning Autism


Young people with High-Functioning Autism (HFA) and Asperger’s (AS) usually want to fit-in and have relationships with friends and classmates, but they just don’t know how to do so effectively. They lack an understanding of conventional social rules and often “appear” to lack empathy. In order to improve socialization, these “special needs” kids need to learn and focus on socialization from an “intellectual” standpoint. Things that come naturally for children without autism need concentration by those with it.
The ability to navigate everyday social interactions presents significant challenges for kids on the autism spectrum. Social situations that present difficulties can range from the fairly simple (e.g., engaging in a conversation with a peer) to the extremely complex (e.g., determining whether a peer who seems friendly is actually harmful in some way).
Examples of important social skills to be taught to HFA and AS children include (but are not limited to):

 

 

Source: My Aspergers Child: Helping Kids on the Autism Spectrum to “Fit-In” with Their Peer Group


“My 10 year-old child with high-functioning autism is very smart, but he is very, very poorly coordinated. He has difficulty riding his bike, bowling, catching, hitting a tennis ball, kicking, shooting a basketball, diving in a pool, swinging a bat, and throwing. He can’t run fast without tripping, and he has terrible posture. As an infant, he was a later walker (almost 17 months). He was a very sloppy eater, and still has trouble cutting with a knife or the edge of his fork. Also, he had some speech articulation issues. We were hoping he would grow out of all this, but he hasn’t. I wonder if there is anything we could do to help him be less awkward. Does what I’ve described sound “normal” for some children with autism? Or does it sound concerning? How physically uncoordinated should he be before we try to get professional help for him?”

Many children with High-Functioning Autism (HFA) and Asperger’s (AS) have a comorbid condition called Hypotonia, which is sometimes referred to as “floppiness.” This is because the muscles are meant to help support the skeletal system and are designed to prevent certain kinds of motion. Because the muscles are not especially tight, children with Hypotonia frequently experience “hypermobility” (i.e., the ability to move limbs into awkward positions). They often find that they’re able to very easily carry out feats that require flexibility, but not strength or balance (e.g., splits, back-bending, shoulder rotation, etc.). Also, they may display uncommon flexibility in other joints (e.g., fingers).

 

Source: My Aspergers Child: Hypotonia in Kids on the Autism Spectrum


Source: My Aspergers Child: Understanding the “Easily Annoyed” Child on the Autism Spectrum


There should more acceptance of others, for then the world would be a better place.

WindSweptChildOnAShootingStar

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I was reading the wonderful post  Autistic Confessions – Stimming at Work — Anonymously Autistic  ( I have posted it a little before this.)

It brought to mind things for me that I thought I would share.

Firstly, I should explain to you what stimming is. The word ” stimming ” is short for self-stimulatory behaviour and stimming can be  flapping, rocking, spinning, squeezing, biting, chewing, picking, pacing,shaking legs and so much more. Stimming is used to manage anxiety, stress, anger, to help deal with overwhelming situations, or just for comfort.

I grew up not knowing I was Autistic, when I used to rock, as rocking from side to side is my way of stimming, I was told  ” don’t rock !” When I asked why ?  I was told that,  ” crazy people rock and you don’t want people to think you are crazy !” – whilst I can…

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We are all different so why should one person react the same as another, why not accept and respect a person for who there are, not how others wish them to be.

Bear this in mind and you and your son will come through.

ourownnormal

He’s 6, he has beautiful big brown eyes, a head full of lushious dark hair and Gorgeous olive skin.

He’s an amazing reader, fabulous at puzzles, he can name the actors names of any marvel character and knows anything there is to know about super powers.

He’s tidy, smart, sweet and particular.

By the age of two he knew all his colours, shapes, how to work the iPad, the apps and how to navigate round them better than I do now.

He can be loving, so loving, caring and thoughtful and so intelligent in his chosen fields.

I never realised as he was my first child, all the things he didn’t do. He didn’t wave goodbye, he didn’t like cuddles and he was always on the go. I just thought he didn’t like goodbyes, that he wasn’t an overly affectionate child and that he was ‘just a boy’. I was…

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Source: My Aspergers Child: Is a Formal “Diagnosis” of Asperger’s Helpful or Harmful?


Source: My Aspergers Child: Behavioral Interventions for Children with Asperger’s and High-Functioning Autism


Source: My Aspergers Child: Explaining the “Hidden Curriculum” to Children on the Autism Spectrum

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