Age UK statistics are alarming and shame the country | Care Industry News


New Age UK analysis finds that in the last 12 months, about 700,000 requests for formal care and support, equivalent to 51% of all applications, have been made by older people and yet have resulted in them not receiving formal care services. This is equivalent to 2,000 claims from older people being unsuccessful each day, or 80 every hour.[1]

In some of these cases, the older person was found by their council not to meet the eligibility criteria set for the social care system, and that was the end of it (23% of all requests for help); while in others the older person was found ineligible, but their council then referred them onto other services in the hope that they could assist, including their local Age UK (46% of all requests for help). [1]

 

Source: Age UK statistics are alarming and shame the country | Care Industry News

Calls to increase pay for care staff-The elephant in the room is that you can be paid more for stacking shelves | Care Industry News


Mr Kreft said the nub of the problem was that the funding formulas of local councils and health boards were predicated on paying low wages to staff and the “minimal differentials” for taking on extra responsibilities – and that had to change.

The call from Mario Kreft MBE, the chair of Care Forum Wales, came after a campaign was launched to attract another 20,000 social care workers in Wales over the next 10 years.

At the moment, he said, the funding formulas of local councils and health boards were predicted on paying low wages to staff.

The number of elderly people over the age of 80 is predicted to increase by 44% in Wales by 2030 and there are currently about 113,000 people in the social care sector.

The ageing population in Wales and relatively older workforce are two factors for the increasing demand for care workers in people’s own homes, workers in residential care and more nurses.

Mr Kreft said: “I can certainly say that this is the most challenging time that social care providers have faced in trying to recruit sufficient workers to actually do the job.

 

Source: Calls to increase pay for care staff-The elephant in the room is that you can be paid more for stacking shelves | Care Industry News

Councils continue to exploit their dominant purchasing power of social care | Care Industry News


Councils in Great Britain and Northern Ireland’s Health and Social Care Trusts are continuing to exploit their dominant purchasing power, according to a new report from UKHCA, the professional association for homecare providers.

The author claims that “Councils are buying homecare services for older people on the cheap” and calls on Government to fund care at a sustainable level in the forthcoming Budget.

“The Homecare Deficit 2018” exposes the scale of underfunding of a fragile state-funded sector across each of England’s nine government regions and in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland (notes 2).

Using data obtained under Freedom of Information legislation, UKHCA found that the average prices paid for homecare in the UK is just £16.12 per hour, almost £2 per hour less than UKHCA’s Minimum Price for Homecare of £18.01 per hour (notes 3 and 4).

UKHCA calculates that the UK’s homecare sector needs at least £402 million per year to ensure that homecare workers receive the statutory National Living Wage, while also ensuring that homecare providers can meet their statutory obligations.

However, the size of the deficit this year would be £921 million if national governments and local councils were to commit to raising the status of the homecare workforce to at least the independently calculated Real Living Wage.

Neither of these figures account for the additional costs of people currently going without care and support.

UKHCA’s Policy Director and author of the report, Colin Angel, said:

“Rates paid by the majority of authorities do not cover adequate wages for our vital homecare workforce and the costs of running safe and effective services.

“These rates also illustrate why homecare providers are increasingly left with no choice but to refuse to take on, or handback, care to authorities.

 

Source: Councils continue to exploit their dominant purchasing power of social care | Care Industry News

UKHCA welcomes analysis report on adult social care | Care Industry News


UKHCA welcomes today’s report from the Local Government Ombudsman (LGO) analysing complaints which it received from people who use social care services in 2015-16.

LGO’s report contains an encouraging picture that more people are willing to speak out when things go wrong, when their services are commissioned poorly, or delivered inappropriately.

Source: UKHCA welcomes analysis report on adult social care | Care Industry News

33% increase in delayed transfers from hospital as social care faces £1.9bn funding gap | Care Industry News


Commenting on the Combined Performance Summary for September published this morning by NHS England, Nuffield Trust Director of Research Professor John Appleby

Source: 33% increase in delayed transfers from hospital as social care faces £1.9bn funding gap | Care Industry News