Austerity 1: next year, UK ministers required to report progress on reinstating rights of people with disabilities


What is the point of the UN when nations just ignore it.

We have North Korea thumbing their noses at the UN by continuing with their aim to be a nuclear based country.

But is the UK also doing something similar by ignoring the UN report on the situation of disabled people in the UK.

So on the one hand the UK is condemning North Korea for not abiding by UN directives, while at the same time doing the same over disability rights, so to equalise the situation should not sanctions be raised against the UK.

Political Concern

Equal Lives chief executive Mark Harrison said: “In a very short space of time we have gone from having some of the best rights in the world to a crisis situation where people are dying because of the barriers and discrimination caused by austerity.” 

In 2015, a team of United Nations investigators began a two-week visit to the UK as part of an inquiry into allegations of “systematic and grave” violations of disabled people’s human rights.

Stephen Naysmith Social Affairs Correspondent of the Herald has reported that the UN Committee on the Rights of Disabled People has issued a 17 page report on the UK which contained more recommendations for improvement than for any other country in the committee’s 10 year history.

UK rapporteur to the committee Mr Stig Langvad, said the review had been “the most challenging exercise in the history of the Committee”, and criticised the government for…

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DWP report confirms fears over impact of ILF closure | DisabledGo News and Blog


Former recipients of the Independent Living Fund (ILF) in England experienced a loss of support, a greater reliance on unpaid care and an “adverse” impact on their physical and mental health after its closure, according to a government report. The research, published by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), confirms many of the warnings and concerns raised by disabled activists who campaigned against the decision to close the fund, before it shut in June 2015. Researchers only spoke to 50 former ILF recipients – or their relatives – out of nearly 17,000 disabled people with high support needs that the fund had been helping to live independently at the time it closed. But they concluded that those former recipients who saw their support “heavily reduced” as a result of the closure – which saw non-ringfenced funding passed by the government to local authorities – “experienced multiple changes” to their lives. The report says: “They argued that reductions in care were unfair and

Source: DWP report confirms fears over impact of ILF closure | DisabledGo News and Blog

ILF closure cuts report produces instant results from Labour and Greens | DisabledGo News and Blog


Senior figures in the Labour and Green parties have pledged to introduce a national, free, needs-led system of support, after a report showed that the Independent Living Fund’s (ILF) closure resulted in “substantial” cuts to disabled people’s care packages. Inclusion London’s report – One Year On: Evaluating The Impact Of The Closure Of The Independent Living Fund – was launched in parliament this week as part of the Rights Not Games week of action planned by Disabled People Against Cuts to coincide with the start of the Rio 2016 Paralympics. The report includes analysis of freedom of information responses received by Inclusion London from each of the capital’s 33 local authorities, which show vast differences in the proportion of former ILF recipients whose packages have been cut after the fund’s closure. In Waltham Forest, 68 per cent of former ILF-users had their support cut, while 58 per cent saw their package reduced in Hounslow, 56 per cent in Newham, 51 per cent in Havering, 42 per

Source: ILF closure cuts report produces instant results from Labour and Greens | DisabledGo News and Blog

Councils ‘levelling down’ care packages after ILF closure | Community Care


Report reveals more than half of local authorities in London have cut care packages since the closure of the Independent Living Fund in June last year

Source: Councils ‘levelling down’ care packages after ILF closure | Community Care

Council cuts ex-ILF care packages after spurning chance to raise funds | DisabledGo News and Blog


Almost half of former recipients of the Independent Living Fund (ILF) in a London borough are facing cuts to their care packages, after their council rejected the chance to ask for more social care funds by raising council tax. Labour-run Merton council in south-west London had the chance to increase council tax by 1.7 per cent to pay for extra social care funding, but turned down the opportunity because of an election promise not to increase taxes for four years. The end of an extra tax that Londoners have been paying for the last 10 years to fund the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games meant the council could have asked for extra money for social care without seeing overall council tax rates increase for 2016-17. The council has also refused to ring-fence government money – given to local authorities following the closure of the ILF last year – to support only former ILF-recipients, using it instead more widely across social care. In January, the council faced protests over its

Source: Council cuts ex-ILF care packages after spurning chance to raise funds | DisabledGo News and Blog

Government agrees four more years of ILF transition cash for councils | DisabledGo News and Blog


The government has agreed to fund former users of the Independent Living Fund (ILF) in England for the next four years, following months of campaigning pressure from disabled activists. The minister for disabled people, Justin Tomlinson, passed on the news yesterday (10 February) to two former ILF-users at a meeting in his department. The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) yesterday published a six-week consultation on the plans – although it has so far failed to publicise the consultation – which describes the funding it proposes passing on to local authorities over the four years from April 2016. ILF was funded by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), and when it closed on 30 June 2015 it was helping nearly 17,000 disabled people with the highest support needs to live independently. But ministers decided it should be scrapped, promising instead that nine months’ worth of non-ring-fenced funding would be transferred through DCLG to councils in England and to

Source: Government agrees four more years of ILF transition cash for councils | DisabledGo News and Blog