‘We all want to live the lives we choose’


Scope's Blog

Jameisha talks about the impact of a hidden impairment and how attitudes affect her daily life.

As a young person living with Lupus and a few other hidden impairments, I have had my fair share of challenges confronting attitudes surrounding my conditions. These experiences often come from well-meaning people, but they are a marker of how we need to change as a society to be more understanding and inclusive.

I have become very self-conscious about how people see me as a young person with an invisible impairment. So many thoughts go through my mind. What’s everyone thinking when I sit in the priority seating area? Are people judging me for getting the lift instead of the stairs? Are people staring at me for using the disabled parking space at the supermarket. It got to the point where I wouldn’t take help in fear that I would be judged. Ultimately, the…

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Parking attendant pens brilliant response to rude driver | Daily Mail Online


Holly Brewster, from Barnsley, South Yorkshire, was shocked by the note left on fiancé Tom Shillaw’s car after using her blue badge to park in a disabled bay at Valley Centertainment.

Source: Parking attendant pens brilliant response to rude driver | Daily Mail Online

My daughter was thrown out of a pub for being disabled


Scope's Blog

Last weekend, after celebrating Brighton Pride, Jenny’s daughter Charlie was asked to leave a pub because she is disabled. Jenny chose to share their experience in a post on Facebook and the response has been amazing, with messages of support coming from hundreds of people. The post has now been shared over 1000 times, as well as in the media.

In this blog Jenny shares her story, why she felt she needed to write it, and why raising awareness of invisible disabilities is so important to her.

My 19-year-old daughter Charlie has two chromosome abnormalities and is a bit of an enigma. On the one hand, she is very innocent, child-like and can’t read or write but, on the other hand, she has a great vocabulary and wants to be a teenager, just like other young people her age. She will never be able to do things on…

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Invisible Disabilities: The Facts and Figures [Infographic] | DisabledGo News and Blog


Yesterday (3rd December) was the UN’s ‘International Day of Persons with Disabilities’. It is important to remember that many disabilities aren’t obvious at a

Source: Invisible Disabilities: The Facts and Figures [Infographic] | DisabledGo News and Blog

Starbucks apologises for telling woman she was ‘not disabled enough’ to use the toilet


Original post from Disabled Go News

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Miss Challis, a supervisor for a care agency, told the Standard: “We went into Starbucks to get a coffee but before that mum needed to use the toilet.

“My mum loves their mugs, so was adding one to the mini-collection, and we wanted to sit down and have a drink because mum needed a rest.

“Both toilets were locked so I asked the lady is she wouldn’t mind opening them for me.

“She looked my mum up and down and said ‘she isn’t disabled.’

“Mum replied with ‘not every disability is visible.’

“From that she reluctantly opened the door, looked my mum up and down again, and said ‘you look perfectly fine to me.’

“To my utter shock I went over to ask to speak to the manager. He said he wasn’t going to deal with it, he didn’t even apologise.”

The manager told Miss Challis that English was not the staff member’s first language, but she said the pair felt this was “no excuse” and left the store.

She said; “From there we went to sit down and have a drink elsewhere and mum was very, very upset and felt humiliated.

“I was so upset; when my mum is upset I’m upset and she’s a very strong woman so seeing her break is heartbreaking for me.”

Miss Challis said the incident has put her off visiting Starbucks in future, telling the Standard: “I used to go there quite a bit, and I’ll never ever use them again – Costa all the way.”

A spokeswoman for Starbucks UK said: “We have investigated this matter and would like to pass on our apologies to the customer affected. Our toilets are always available for our customers use.”

Liz Sayce, chief executive of Disability Rights UK, said the incident highlighted the need for companies to be more aware of unseen disabilities.

She said: “There has been a legal obligation since 1999 to offer equal access to services to people with any form of disability.

“I’m glad that Starbucks has apologised, but we really need companies to make it clear to all their staff that they have a legal duty to make services accessible to people with any kind of disability.

“So often the public thinks that because the the person isn’t using a wheelchair they’re not really disabled.

“Disabilities like arthritis, diabetes, heart conditions are just as real.

“It can be very upsetting if you are not welcomed and a service is not made accessible to you.”

Read the full article online: http://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/hold-waiting-for-additional-comments-starbucks-apologises-for-telling-woman-she-was-not-disabled-a2916486.html

Roisin Norris

Hi I’m Roisin Norris, Digital Marketing Executive at DisabledGo and I will be uploading blogs and news for you all to read.

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Someone Left a ‘Faker’ Note by Her Handicapped Tag. Here’s What They Didn’t Know About Her


Original post from IJ Review

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College student Julie McGovern was issued a handicapped parking pass years ago due to a chronic illness that leaves her unable to stand or walk for long periods of time. But because she doesn’t require crutches or a wheelchair, she often feels uncomfortable using it.

She recently explained her feelings on social media:

“Being a young person with an invisible chronic illness is one of the hardest things I’ve ever dealt with. People think I look fine, so I am not sick…My doctor issued me a handicapped parking tag. I have always been afraid of what others would say and I often sit in my car until I feel no one is around so that they won’t judge me or accuse me of using the system.”

McGovern’s comments are part of much longer Facebook post entitled “Today My Fear Came True,” in which she reacts to a note left on her car by a stranger:

Image Credit: Facebook
Image Credit: Facebook

She described her initial reaction to the note:

“Today my worst fear came true. So many emotions flooded my mind. I was hurt, I was angry, I wanted my voice to be heard, but this person is a coward and could not tell me what he/she thought to my face. This person incorrectly perceived my situation, because it is impossible for someone my age to have an illness.

This person doesn’t know me or my struggles. They don’t know what this illness has taken from me. They don’t see the countless nights I cry myself to sleep, soaking my pillow with tears, pleading – praying for God to heal me. They don’t see the weakness, the pain, the symptoms that are very real, but only I can feel. They don’t understand, and until it happens to them they never will.”

The young Arkansas woman suffers from Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, known as POTS – one of a number of serious afflictions known as ‘invisible’ diseases.

As Fox16 reports, POTS can cause McGovern’s “blood pressure to drop to dangerously low levels and her heart rate to speed up.”

faker1

But instead of lashing out or getting angry at the ignorance of strangers, McGovern is using this opportunity to raise awareness for those with invisible disabilities. As she writes in her post:

“A handicap comes in all shapes and sizes. Don’t judge someone by the way they look. If you are unsure, approach me and ask me about my illness. I am always happy to share my story and raise awareness, because if it reaches even one life or inspires one person, or helps many more, it was worth it.”

According to the Invisible Disabilities Association, 26 million Americans suffer from severe disabilities, while only about 7 million require a cane, crutches, wheelchair or walker.

Examples of invisible disabilities can include audio and visual impairments, cystic fibrosis and multiple sclerosis, in addition to POTS.  …………’