Education needs a total overhaul, not just new faces and minds | Letters | The Guardian


Letter: Helen Parker says brilliant teachers of all ages are ground down by the numbers and by administrators who lack imagination, courage and leadership


Yes, education does need a complete overall for what does our current education Syllabus produce, well not much, except ‘sausages’.

Sausages, well, Yes, for they are there to ensure students receive an education for them to pass exams to get a Certificate, which in reality is there to ensure a few to go to university and maybe some more to get a job.

But for many students it does virtually nothing, certainly not to enable students to live their lives. Does it provide for students to learn life skills, does the syllabus enable students to learn anything which will be useful in their forthcoming lives.

Well I believe not, for it did not for me, not that my school life was wasted for it was not, but that was down to me not school. There was a school Master whose job content included to enable students leaving school to have some idea what they would be doing when they left school. But for me that did not occur and it was up to myself to propel myself into a career into what I had no idea was was about. However, from my own endeavours I did come through and received the promotions that I wished for.

Was I lucky, I feel I was, were there any students who find their school lives were wasted, perhaps this was down to themselves , but the schools should be there to help them.

The teachers do their best, but the system is what is wrong, for education is not centred on students, but on a system, which assumes all students are the same, ‘one fits all’, which is never going to be right.

As per usual in the UK, the money available is way insufficient, yet another area where it is not, for there is health and certainly social care to name two more and there will be many other areas.

Again it is the system, for systems need to change for they should be there for everyone, but currently the system is there for the system.

Source: Education needs a total overhaul, not just new faces and minds | Letters | The Guardian

Budget: £5bn for coronavirus will help social care but government criticised for lack of sector funding | Community Care


Social care will get a piece of the £5bn fund announced in today’s Budget to fight coronavirus (Covid-19) but the government was heavily criticised for its lack of further action to shore up the sector. In his first Budget, chancellor Rishi Sunak’s said the coronavirus money would “fund pressures in the NHS, support local authorities […]

Source: Budget: £5bn for coronavirus will help social care but government criticised for lack of sector funding | Community Care

New figures from Age UK show our social care system is disintegrating | Care Industry News


New figures from Age UK reveal the shocking extent to which millions of older people are being left to prop up the country’s disintegrating care system, with those aged 65 and over providing nearly 54 million hours of unpaid care each week in England in 2016[i].

These figures highlight the rising demands being placed on older informal carers as Government underfunding causes the social care safety net to shrink, resulting in increasing numbers of our older population in need of care, being thrown back on their own and their family’s resources.

In 2015/16, over two and a quarter million (2,299,200) people aged 65 and over provided care – a 16.6 per cent increase on five years ago when 1,829,200 did so[ii],[iii].

Over 400,000 (404,400) of these unpaid carers are from the oldest demographic in our society (aged 80 and over), and they provided 12.7 million hours of care in 2015/16 – a 12.7 per cent increase from 2009/10[iv],[v].

Most older people willingly take on the task of helping to care for a loved one – usually but not always a husband or wife – and don’t think of themselves as doing anything out of the ordinary. However, leaving older people to shoulder too much, or sometimes all of the responsibility and hard work of looking after someone in declining health and with significant care needs is unfair. It can also put these older family carers’ own health at risk, and many of them are coping with health problems themselves.

Over half (54.8 per cent) of people aged 65 and over who provide at least one hour of care have a long-standing illness or disability – equating to well over a million people (1,262,500), or one in ten (10.7%) of all these family carers

 

Source: New figures from Age UK show our social care system is disintegrating | Care Industry News

We can’t fix social care if we think it’s just for older people : The Guardian


Disabled people aged 18-64 make up a third of all social care users, yet they are not getting the support they need

Young man with crutches sitting on hospital chairs

For too long, discussions on social care have overlooked those who need care and support earlier in life. Photograph: Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

There’s no doubt that one of the biggest challenges facing Britain is how we deal with our ageing population. The countless warnings about the crisis in social care leave no room for doubt. Over the last seven years, budgets have decreased by more than £6bn (pdf) in real terms, and more than 1.2 million older people are struggling to get by without proper care.

The government’s promise to consult on social care in England provides an opportunity to bring about change. But for too long, this debate has almost exclusively focused on older people, overlooking those who need care and support much earlier in life.

More than 280,000 working age disabled adults rely on social care to lead independent, healthy lives. When done right, it empowers them not just to live, but to have a life.

At the MS Society, our new report, End the Care Crisis: Stories from people affected by MS in Englanddemonstrates the transformative impact social care can have for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). From Edith, whose support enables her to get to work each morning, to Martyn who, with the support of a carer, is able to do things others might take for granted, like go to the cinema.

It also highlights the devastating consequences when people aren’t able to get adequate support. Take Angela, for example. At just 35 with two young children, her husband (and carer) is at breaking point. And yet the first time she contacted the council for support, she was told help was only given to people in wheelchairs.

The system continues to fail us, and that is totally unacceptable.

Disabled people aged 18-64 make up a third of long-term social care users, accounting for almost half of the social care budget. We already know that younger people with MS are less likely to get proper support – only 32% of 18- to 29-year-olds with MS have all their care needs met, compared with 73% of those aged 70 to 79. But this isn’t the only thing illustrating the age divide.

Perhaps one of the most worrying symptoms of our failing social care system is the number of younger adults living in care homes for older people. A Freedom of Information request by the MS Society revealed more than 3,300 adults under 65 are in this situation in England. This indicates that, across the country, almost one in seven younger disabled adults in residential care could be in homes with mostly older people, and potentially missing out on the specialist care they need.

Not only are care homes for older people rarely equipped to meet all the needs of younger adults, living in such settings can be extremely isolating, and have a damaging impact on their quality of life and mental health. This is just one example of a much broader, deep-seated problem.

As a country, we do not provide younger adults with conditions such as MS the care we know they need. The question of how we fund and deliver quality social care has been a subject of debate in this country for at least 20 years. We’ve seen 10 government consultations and reviews of social care in that time, yet our politicians have failed to make the difficult decisions on the back of these.

Social care remains in crisis and there will be a £2.5bn funding gap by the end of the decade. While it’s promising that the government last month finally acknowledged the need to improve social care for younger as well as older people, we must hold it to account on this.

There is increasing evidence that fixing the social care system makes sense – not just ethically and morally but financially too. Reform could help prevent and delay acute needs from developing, reduce pressure on the NHS, galvanise local economies and, most importantly, enable disabled people to live independent, dignified and productive lives.

This latest consultation has to involve disabled people of all ages, offering real action and a bold vision for the future. One that recognises the experiences of everyone who depends on social care, and finally gives us a system that works for all who need it.

Michelle Mitchell is chief executive of the MS Society

 

Source: We can’t fix social care if we think it’s just for older people : The Guardian

How Far Can NHS Cuts Go?


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This is the Lancaster family – Nicola and Ian have spent ten years looking after their severely-disabled child 24-7, their only break coming once a month, when he went to a respite centre for the weekend. Now the centre is closing, because there’s no #NHS money to run it – and this is not an isolated case….

Source: How Far Can NHS Cuts Go? – Paul Moss  @BBCPaulMoss

This is indeed not an isolated incident and is not only related to Children’s Social Care and health services, but also to Adult Social Care and health services.

While there are needs for those children and adults who are in need of care and are entitled to Assessments of Needs, the Carers themselves also have needs and they are entitled to their own Carers Assessments for carers of children being * The Children and Families Act 2014 amends the Children Act 1989 and for carers of adults *The Care Act 2014. Here are some Care Act Factsheets.

When it comes to funding where needs have been assessed then that need should be provided and this should not be delayed pending disputes between social services and health.

Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

Thousands of jobs in learning disability sector could be at risk if social care doesn’t receive more funding, warns research | Learning Disability Today


As many as 30,000 jobs – 10% of the workforce – in the learning disability sector could be at risk in the next four years, unless additional funding is provided to meet the rising costs of the sector, warns new research.

Source: Thousands of jobs in learning disability sector could be at risk if social care doesn’t receive more funding, warns research | Learning Disability Today

Low fees and living wage policy risk mass exodus of home care providers from market


Original post from Community Care

‘…………….

Providers increasingly turning down or handing back care contracts to councils, finds United Kingdom Homecare Association survey

Photo: ImageBROKER/REX
Photo: ImageBROKER/REX

Hundreds of home care providers will reduce the care they provide or shut up shop completely in the next year, a survey by the United Kingdom Homecare Association (UKHCA) has found.

The survey of 492 providers found less than half (38%) felt confident they would still be trading in a year’s time. A further 11% said they would ‘definitely’ or ‘probably’ have ceased trading by September 2016.

The low care fees paid by councils and a lack of funding for the recently-announced ‘national living wage’ policy were named as the two key factors placing a strain on providers.

The ‘national living wage’, a compulsory wage floor of £7.20 for workers aged 25 and over, will be introduced in April 2016. So far, the government has not announced extra funding for local authorities to help providers meet the additional costs. The survey found that of the providers trading directly with councils (288), 74% would look to cease or reduce their care supply as a result of the policy.

If these predictions were carried out, this would affect 50% of all people receiving care from these providers (including self-funders), according to the UKHCA.

These findings are likely to compound fears already raised by providers that unless the living wage is adequately funded, it will further threaten the viability of the home care market. Any additional funding for the policy will be announced as part of next month’s spending review, which will set government spending limits from 2016-20.

‘Extremely vulnerable’

The survey also found that in the past 12 months 93% of providers had seen a real-terms cut in the fees they received from councils to which they supplied care, despite 74% requesting a rate increase over the same period. A further 20% reported an actual reduction in price compared to the previous year.

There was also evidence of a small number of providers starting to hand back existing contracts for the supply of care. Of the providers trading with councils, 26% had handed back 1,807 people’s packages of care on the basis of insufficient price in the past 12 months and 71% had refused to take on new packages of care for the same reason.

Colin Angel, policy director at the UKHCA, said the low fees and lack of funding for the living wage placed the home care market in an extremely vulnerable position.

He added: “Rapid withdrawal from the home care sector will create an additional burden on under-funded councils, who should be prioritising care for people who reply on home-based care, not dealing with local market failure to which they themselves have contributed.”

The providers in the sample were from both the independent and voluntary sectors and delivered a total of 887,962 hours of care per week to 85,000 people in their own homes.   ………….’