Man with severe learning disabilities faces being deported to Jamaica | Home Office | The Guardian


Judge has found 34-year-old, who needs support with basic tasks, would ‘struggle to survive’ if deported

 

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The Home Office is the guilty here, guilty of having no ‘Duty of Care’.

It is very evident that this man was exploited by those he was with and therefore was not guilty of any offence. In fact the Home Office should be doing all they can to retain this man in the UK and allow his family to care for him.

But, the Home office is blinkered for if he is deported they will be sending him to certain death, but I believe the Home Office has no conscience and certainly no understanding of the circumstances.

Whether this be by ignorance or design is not clear, but I fear the latter.

Source: Man with severe learning disabilities faces being deported to Jamaica | Home Office | The Guardian

End mass jabs and live with Covid, says ex-head of vaccine taskforce | Coronavirus | The Guardian


Dr Clive Dix says we should treat the virus like flu

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To some extent I do agree with Dr Clive Dix, but to do this all factors need to be equal to those of flu.

With flu other countries are not barring people from going there or requiring flu vaccinations to be taken.

As to the administering of COVID and flu vaccinations all are not equal, as with COVID there is only the injection process while with flu there are both injections and nasal sprays. While for the flu the nasal sprays are usually only given to children as they do not have the injections offered to them. But, there is an exception for some adults and these are for adults with learning disabilities and/or Autism who are averse to needles. For these persons the children’s nasal sprays are available and while not as fully effected as the injections they do offer some protection, which is better than none. However, currently for COVID-19 there are no nasal sprays, although I believe some are in the process of being research as are tablets and patches.

There are some nasal sprays which are said to be effective to COVID, but on investigation there generally offer no more protection than for the common cold, which is a very, very mild form of COVID, no way as virulent as the COVID-19 and the various variants.

To help some persons with learning disabilities who are needle averse there is some needle aversion therapies, but these are generally only to combat the actual needle injection and not any other reactions. For with some people the needle aversion is from past experiences where they did have needle injections for say, operations and the resultant outcomes of the operations are what is really the cause of the needle aversion. So, it is very unlikely that the needle aversion therapies will be effective in these instances, so until nasal sprays, tablets or patches will be available, these persons with needle aversions will remain unvaccinated.

So, currently all is not equal and will never be until the researches are complete and nasal sprays, tablets and patches are made available.

In fact if they were available they would be easier to administer than injections, as they would not normally require a suitably qualified person to do the administering which needle injections require. This would be of great advantage in many developing counties for not only would they be easier to administer, could well be self-administering, thereby no need to purchase to vaccine, but there would be no additional costs for a qualified person for the administering and more than likely no temperature storing requirements or not as extensive.

So to make all equal, patches, tablets and nasal sprays have to be universally available for everyone and this should be well before mass jabbing is stopped.

Source: End mass jabs and live with Covid, says ex-head of vaccine taskforce | Coronavirus | The Guardian

Lancaster University intranasal vaccine offers promise to block COVID-19 where it starts | Lancaster University


Research by Lancaster University scientists to create a COVID-19 vaccine which can be administered through the nose has taken a significant step forward.

Source: Lancaster University intranasal vaccine offers promise to block COVID-19 where it starts | Lancaster University

Fury at ‘do not resuscitate’ notices given to Covid patients with learning disabilities | Coronavirus | The Guardian


Yet again persons with learning disabilities, (LD), are, apparently, going unnoticed by the UK Authorities. This is in spite of a report in November 2020 from Public Health England,  which showed that people with learning disabilities were three to six times more likely to die from covid-19 than the general population during the pandemic’s first wave

This is when, before COVID-19, the risk of persons with LD dying earlier than persons without LD is well known and the reason the LeDeR programme with the University of Bristol, is being researched, which started on 1 July 2016 and is funded by NHS England.

So, why with all the above are persons with LD being ignored and even worse, if they went into hospital could well have a DNR (Do not resuscitate), placed on their record.

It would appear all is against persons with LD, but why?

Do these authorities feel the right to life of persons with LD should be ignored, if this is correct, then this is a very dangerous and very worrying premise, for to believe, this is how exterminations start, just look at Germany in the 1930/40s.

This needs to be stopped forthwith for persons with LD have as much right to life as anyone.

 

 

Source: Fury at ‘do not resuscitate’ notices given to Covid patients with learning disabilities | Coronavirus | The Guardian

Covid 19 my vaccine experience.


I too have had the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine and now waiting for the second injection.

The first injection did not cause me any major problems, only had some numbness, on the next day, where the injection had been, but this had gone by the following day.

I have not rushed out thinking I was now safe, but continue to shield and will do until, at least, I have the second injection. Even then I will continue to stay safe, wear a face-mask when I go out and respect Social Distancing. I also wash my hand regularly throughout the day and certainly when I come back from medical appointments, the only reason I do leave home.

Until everyone has had the full course of injections I will not feel safe to go out.

I had the injection, not only because I believe in having injections and to safeguard myself, but also to safeguard others and do my bit to see that the effects and mutations of COVID-19 are substantially reduced or even eliminated. However, I do appreciate that I and others will need regular COVID injections, just like we do for the Flu. This is not to say COVID is like the flu, as it is very much worse and could cause long-term deliberating conditions in those who are not vaccinated.

I do have an adult daughter who has a severe aversion to needles and as she has Learning Disabilities and Autism does not have the capacity to understand anything about COVID-19.

So, until there is an alternative to the injection, such as a Nasal Spray she will be open to contract COVID-19, so I owe it to her to do all I can the ensure I will not be able to pass COVID-19 onto her.

The poor side of life

Yesterday I had my Covid 19 vaccination. I had the Pfizer vaccination and I really couldn’t wait for this day to arrive.

Most of you will know that my Covid 19 and Long Covid experience has been horrendous.

I first became ill with Covid 19 last April and I quickly became extremely unwell. You can read about this in my previous blog posts. I also developed Pneumonia and pleurisy and had numerous relapses.

To say that I was excited for my vaccine was an understatement, I can never forget how ill I have been and I certainly don’t want to catch it again. Not only do I have to think about myself I also have to think about my daughters wellbeing as well.

I was virtually bedbound for around a month except for the odd trip downstairs which completely exhausted me. As a result my illness really scared my daughter…

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Fury at ‘do not resuscitate’ notices given to Covid patients with learning disabilities | Coronavirus | The Guardian


Yet again persons with learning disabilities, (LD), are, apparently, going unnoticed by the UK Authorities, especially in Wales. This is in spite of a report in November 2020 from Public Health England,  which showed that people with learning disabilities were three to six times more likely to die from covid-19 than the general population during the pandemic’s first wave

This is when, before COVID-19, the risk of persons with LD dying earlier than persons without LD is well known and the reason the LeDeR programme with the University of Bristol, is being researched, which started on 1 July 2016 and is funded by NHS England.

So, why with all the above are persons with LD being ignored and even worse, if they went into hospital could well have a DNR (Do not resuscitate), placed on their record.

It would appear all is against persons with LD, but why?

Do these authorities feel the right to life of persons with LD should be ignored, if this is correct, then this is a very dangerous and very worrying premise, for to believe, this is how exterminations start, just look at Germany in the 1930/40s.

This needs to be stopped forthwith for persons with LD have as much right to life as anyone

Source: Fury at ‘do not resuscitate’ notices given to Covid patients with learning disabilities | Coronavirus | The Guardian

Frances Whiley: Another Sister Speaks For Her Brother With LD


Yet again persons with learning disabilities, (LD), are, apparently, going unnoticed by the UK Authorities, especially in Wales. This is in spite of a report in November 2020 from Public Health England,  which showed that people with learning disabilities were three to six times more likely to die from covid-19 than the general population during the pandemic’s first wave

This is when, before COVID-19, the risk of persons with LD dying earlier than persons without LD is well known and the reason the LeDeR programme with the University of Bristol, is being researched, which started on 1 July 2016 and is funded by NHS England.

So, why with all the above are persons with LD being ignored and even worse, if they went into hospital could well have a DNR (Do not resuscitate), placed on their record.

It would appear all is against persons with LD, but why?

Do these authorities feel the right to life of persons with LD should be ignored, if this is correct, then this is a very dangerous and very worrying premise, for to believe, this is how exterminations start, just look at Germany in the 1930/40s.

This needs to be stopped forthwith for persons with LD have as much right to life as anyone.

Same Difference

Since the pandemic began more than a year ago, one of my greatest fears has been losing my brother, who lives in a care home. He is in his late 20s, is severely autistic and has epilepsy, as well as other complex needs. He is extremely vulnerable. According to Public Health England, people with severe learning disabilities are six times more likely to die from Covid-19 than the general population. In my brother’s age group, the 18-34 bracket, the death rate is 30 times higher.

Then there is the added risk of where he lives. According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), living in a care home is a “major factor in the increased exposure of people with learning disabilities to Covid-19”. The communal nature of these facilities, combined with how much contact is required between care workers and residents – my brother needs help with everything, from…

View original post 955 more words

Fury At ‘Do Not Resuscitate’ Notices Given To Covid Patients With Learning Disabilities


For this practice to have recurred in the second wave of the pandemic when it was highlighted in the first is extremely worrying, for it needs the dreaded phrase ‘lessons will be learnt’ to be utter again. For, lessons, it appears are never learnt, for to be learnt there must be a willingness to learn, from which it is evident that the willingness is not there, and I do doubt will ever be.

For this stems from the practice in health and many other areas for ‘we know best’ and that it is of no concern that patients and their families are not worthy of being considered.

This centres on the belief that the system is sacrosanct, and people affected are of no concern.

Whereas the person should be at the centre, self-centred care, should be central as the system should fit the person and not the person the system. If it is not possible to achieve then the system needs to be altered to ensure it is.

For, far too long health and also Social Care and other areas feel they are too important to change and therefore the person at the centre is virtually ignored.

If it was not for persons, then health and social care and other areas would not be required. Each person is different and therefore it should not be assumed the practice of ‘one fits all’ is how it should be.

All systems must be flexible to change as and when required with ease and quickly be adaptable.

Unfortunately, there is much disregard with people and organisations for the opinions of people who feel they need to be considered. But their opinions are important and should be listened to for they are endeavouring to make things better for everyone.

Same Difference

People with learning disabilities have been given do not resuscitate orders during the second wave of the pandemic, in spite of widespread condemnation of the practice last year and an urgent investigation by the care watchdog.

Mencap said it had received reports in January from people with learning disabilities that they had been told they would not be resuscitated if they were taken ill with Covid-19.

The Care Quality Commission said in December that inappropriate Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) notices had caused potentially avoidable deaths last year.Advertisementhttps://eb3ca1ecd275ae49142ae247f5e428af.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

DNACPRs are usually made for people who are too frail to benefit from CPR, but Mencap said some seem to have been issued for people simply because they had a learning disability. The CQC is due to publish a report on the practice within weeks.

The disclosure comes as campaigners put growing pressure on ministers to reconsider a decision not…

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The Crown’s Learning Disability Storyline Highlights Painful Lack Of Progress


This is indeed very worrying and in this day and age you would or should expect that it does not occur, but it does.

A few years ago Care and Treatment Reviews (CTRs) were introduced in England by NHS England, and I did start the training to be one of the ‘Experts by Experience’, but, I had to withdraw as I came to the conclusion that I did not have sufficient spare time capacity to do effectively, the work required.

I am, however, aware of some persons who went through the training and became ‘Experts by Experience’. When asked to do reviews these can be anywhere within England and may require the need to have overnight stays if the review is some distance away from where the ‘Expert by Experience’ resides.

In theory these reviews are a very welcoming practice and hope in practice that they hold up to be.

When persons with Learning Disabilities and/or Autism are committed into one of these Special Hospitals, it should have been for a short period of time, but in practice, before the ‘CTRs’ were introduced, but in practice his was not so. As once in it was extremely difficult, if not bordering on the impossible to be discharged, so I do hope the CTRs are effectively being used to minimise this practice.

Perhaps Experts by Experience, if they are willing to do so, could comment.

Same Difference

There are 1.5 million learning disabled people in the UK, but they are rarely seen or heard from. Little is spoken of this demographic of people, who in many cases completely rely on others in order to live.

Unless you’re a family carer or professionally involved, you may not know or have regular contact with any learning disabled people.

However, in episode 7 of the latest season of The Crown, viewers learn more about the royal family and learning disabled people. Peter Morgan, creator of the series, writes about two learning disabled women, Nerissa and Katherine Bowes-Lyon.

In Morgan’s fictional depiction, Princess Margaret and the Queen discover that Katherine and Nerissa, their cousins on their mother’s side, are still alive, despite being listed as dead in Burke’s Peerage, and have spent their adult lives in an “institution for mental defectives”.

Despite being born into wealth and privilege, Nerissa and…

View original post 611 more words

The Celebration of the life of Zoe Angella Sterry


Celebration of the Life of Zoe Sterry

Zoe Angella Sterry

Zoe Angella Sterry was the wife of Chris Sterry, the originator of this Post, and he lost his wife in the early hours of the morning of Saturday 26 September 2020 and her funeral took place on Friday 16 October 2020.

Chris started seeing Zoe in August 1983 and they were married on 4 October 1988, so, in total they had 37 years together, in which 32 years they were married.

Chris did not have any children of his own, but looked after Zoe’s children, David, Katie and Rachel as his own, together with their 3 grandchildren Oliver, Frankie and Luke, not forgetting the latest addition Theo as a Great Grandchild. She also had a younger brother Calvin.

Zoe was a formidable lady, with a big heart and an enormous amount of love. She had a very strong personality and enormous strength of character and would express her opinions to anyone, especially to Sheffield City Council (SCC), whom she had to deal with on behalf of Katie, who had multiple physical disabilities, severe Learning Disabilities, through Cerebral Palsy and also Autism.

Together Zoe and Chris fought with SCC for Katie, which Chris will now do alone.

Zoe and Chris created a very strong partnership and Zoe will be sadly missed by, not only him, but all who came into contact with her.

There is a webcam of the funeral service and the details to access can be seen below and the link will be live for 7 days from the 16 October 2020

NameMrs Zoe Angella Sterry
LocationGrenoside Crematorium, Sheffield – South Chapel
Date & TimeFriday 16/10/2020 12:30
Event Number830579
RequesterLiz Cousins – Tomlinson & Windley

https://www.wesleymedia.co.uk/webcast-view
Login / Order ID: 50539
Password: kadcavmg

Please read through the attached step by step document before using the webcasting service to ensure your system is compatible.

Thanks,

Wesley Media Team

Zoe Angella Sterry

Step by Step document

Please see below the Order of Service

Order of Service

The body of Zoe is now no more, but the memories live on

So does the dealings with SCC for Katie.

At least it will keep Chris busy.

Thank you