CQC survey shows public find search for care extremely stressful | Care Industry News


Choosing adult social care in England is one of the biggest sources of stress compared to other key life events, according to a survey of 1,000 people carried out for the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

The findings come as the quality regulator is raising public awareness about how its inspection findings can help support people in making these important decisions.

The survey findings, out today, reveal that seven in ten (70%) adults who were responsible for choosing care in a care home or at home – either for themselves or a loved one – over the last three years have found it more stressful than choosing their child’s nursery or school, or a venue for their wedding or civil partnership.

52% of people surveyed had cited choosing a care home and 31% had cited choosing care at home in their top three most stressful life decisions.

People’s experiences varied across the country, with the highest proportion of people in the North East (60%), Yorkshire and Humber (56%) and the North West and East Midlands (both 54%) saying that choosing a care home was their most stressful life decision.

 

Source: CQC survey shows public find search for care extremely stressful | Care Industry News

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Social care’s funding pressures in numbers


Ahead of this week’s Autumn Budget, Community Care highlights the main pressures facing social care for children and adults

Photo: Michail Petrov/Fotolia

by Gordon Carson & Luke Stevenson

To stake their claims to receive more funding in next week’s Autumn Budget, children’s and adults’ social care leaders and experts have submitted a series of requests to the chancellor, Philip Hammond, as the sector tries to convince the government of the scale and scope of the crises facing the sector.

Here, we’ve picked out some of the key messages and numbers from their submissions and other reports, ahead of the chancellor’s speech on Wednesday (22 November).

Children’s social care:

25% – the real terms cut in central government funding for children’s services, from £10 billion to £7.6 billion, from 2010-11 to 2015-16. Spending on services by local authorities has fallen from £10 billion to £8.4 billion (Source: Turning the Tide)

£2 billion – the estimated funding gap in children’s services by 2020 (Source: Local Government Association)

£605 million – the overspend on children’s services in 2015/16 (Source: Local Government Association)

40% – the reduction in local authorities’ early help services since 2010-11 (Source: Turning the Tide)

7% – the increase in crisis support spending over the same period (Source: Turning the Tide)

29% – the predicted cut in funding for children’s services from central government by 2020. The most deprived councils had already had to cut funding six times more than the least-deprived areas (Source: Turning the Tide)

23% – the level of spending cuts made in the most deprived local authorities (Source: Turning the Tide)

40% – the proportion of council leaders who said they were unable to meet one or more statutory duties for children (Source: National Children’s Bureau)

72,670  – the number of looked-after children in England as of March 2017 (Source: The Department for Education)

The growing pressures on children’s services have been highlighted again in a report by a consortium of children’s charities, including Action for Children, the National Children’s Bureau and The Children’s Society, which warned that councils were being forced to intervene later in children’s lives because of funding pressures.

The Local Government Association, responding to the report, said councils had worked hard to minimise the impact of cuts, but the increase in numbers of children in care and referrals to children’s services had made this harder to maintain.

Richard Watts, chair of the Local Government Association’s children and young people board, said: “With such high demand for child protection services, councils have been forced to scale back the early help that can make such a difference in reducing the need for this support in the first place.

“This report suggests that government funding for early intervention has fallen by £1.7 billion since 2010, leaving local councils with the impossible task of attempting to continue delivering these services while also providing help and protection to the growing number of children at immediate risk of harm.”

He called on the government to use the Autumn Budget to fully fund children’s services. The association has previously warned about a £2 billion funding gap in children’s services by 2020.

Adults’ social care:

£2.5 billion – the funding gap facing adult social care in 2019-20 (source: a pre-Budget report published by The King’s Fund, Nuffield Foundation and The Health Foundation, which said social care “remains on the brink of crisis”)

7% – the real-terms cut in gross spending on adult social care services by councils, from £19.1 billion in 2009-10 to £17.8 billion in 2016-17 (Source: The King’s Fund, Nuffield Foundation and The Health Foundation)

25% – the reduction in the number of older people accessing publicly funded social care, equating to more than 400,000 people, due to tightened eligibility criteria (Source: The King’s Fund, Nuffield Foundation and The Health Foundation)

9.5% – the increase in hours of unpaid care provided between 2009 and 2014 (Source: The King’s Fund, Nuffield Foundation and The Health Foundation)

1.2 million – the number of older people estimated to have unmet care needs (Source: The King’s Fund, Nuffield Foundation and The Health Foundation)

50 – the number of councils who have had adult care contracts handed back to them by providers (Source: Association of Directors of Adult Social Services annual budget survey, 2017)

64 – the number of councils who had experienced the closure of adult care providers in their area (Source: Association of Directors of Adult Social Services annual budget survey, 2017)

6.6% – the overall staff vacancy rate across adult social care in 2016-17 (Source: Skills for Care / The King’s Fund, Nuffield Foundation and The Health Foundation)

10.4% – the vacancy rate in domiciliary care in 2016-17 (Source: Skills for Care The King’s Fund, Nuffield Foundation and The Health Foundation)

95,000 – the number of people from Europe working in the adult social care sector, compared to 67,000 five years ago. “As a result, Brexit is likely to compound these staffing challenges in social care.” (Source: Skills for Care The King’s Fund, Nuffield Foundation and The Health Foundation)

£1.3 billion – the amount of money required to stabilise the adult social care provider market (Source: pre-Budget submission by the Local Government Association)

£366 million – social care overspends reported by councils in 2016-17 (Source: Local Government Association)

£824 million – savings required in 2017-18 (Source: Local Government Association)

24% – the proportion of funding authorities in England which say they have enough care provision to meet demand (Source: Family and Childcare Trust Older People’s Care Survey 2017)

The government’s announcement in the past week that a green paper on older people’s social care will be published by summer 2018 has largely been welcomed, though immediate funding pressures remain and are, if anything, intensifying.

Although the government announced an extra £2 billion for adult social care in the Spring Budget, the Local Government Association has said this is not enough to deal with all immediate and short-term pressures on adult social care, and highlighted that the funding stops at the end of 2019-20.

It also pointed out that this funding was followed by the introduction in July of “further, more rigid and unrealistic target reductions on delayed transfers of care”, and the possibility of sanctions if targets were not met.

Although the adult social care council tax precept, which enables local authorities to raise council tax bills by 3% in 2017-18 and a further 3% 2018-19 to help fund adult social care, was a “welcome short-term measure”, the LGA said extra council tax income “will not bring in anywhere near enough money to alleviate the growing pressure on social care both now and in the future”.

It also said the government’s main vehicle for driving integration, the Better Care Fund (BCF), had “lost credibility and is no longer fit for purpose”. Its focus on reducing pressure on NHS acute services “is detracting from local initiatives to support social care and stabilise the perilously fragile social care provider market”.

 

Source : Social care’s funding pressures in numbers : Community Care

Which? report shows shortfall in care home places by 2022 | Care Industry News


“These findings reinforce our warning about the urgent need to reform adult social care and deliver a long-term sustainable solution that delivers a range of

Source: Which? report shows shortfall in care home places by 2022 | Care Industry News

Welfare reform ‘will see £50 a week more cuts to 900,000 disabled people’ – Black Triangle Campaign


John Pring Disability News Service 14th September 2017

About 900,000 disabled people will see their weekly incomes fall by at least £50 a week by 2020, because of the continuing impact of the government’s welfare reforms, according to new research.

The research by the consultancy Policy in Practice found that, of 7.2 million working-age, low-income households, more than two-fifths of those containing a working-age disabled person would lose at least £50 a week, compared with November 2016.

The report, The Cumulative Impact Of Welfare Reform: A National Picture, says the impact of measures introduced after November 2016 will see the average low-income household containing a working-age disabled person lose £51.47 a week by 2020, compared with an average loss of £35.82 for households not containing a disabled person.

This will come on top of an average weekly loss of more than £20 for low-income households containing a working-age disabled person as a result of welfare reforms introduced pre-November 2016 – such as the benefit cap, cuts to housing benefit and the bedroom tax – although this figure does not take account of rising living costs.

 

Source: Welfare reform ‘will see £50 a week more cuts to 900,000 disabled people’ – Black Triangle Campaign

Majority of MPs think social care system is not fit for purpose-Independent Age survey | Care Industry News


Responding to an Independent Age survey showing the majority of MPs think the social care system is not fit for purpose, Cllr Izzi Seccombe, Chairman of the Local Government Association’s Community Wellbeing Board,said:

“It is encouraging to see so many MPs across all political parties recognising the need for action to find a sustainable solution to the adult social care funding crisis.

“The extra £2 billion for social care over the next few years is a step in the right direction, but it is only one-off funding which reduces each year. Vital services caring for elderly and disabled people still face an annual £2.3 billion funding gap by 2020, which will continue to grow.

“It is absolutely critical that the Government brings forward its Green Paper on the future of social care and works with local government leaders to address the issue of long-term funding and also create the conditions necessary to ensure the development of the right kind of care and support services.

“We strongly support a cross-party consensus on adult social care and councils are firmly committed to making this happen.

“With councils facing further funding pressures and growing demand for support by the end of the decade and beyond, this is the best way to ensure we will find a solution that ensures our future generations enjoy a care system which doesn’t just help them out of bed and gets them washed

 

Source: Majority of MPs think social care system is not fit for purpose-Independent Age survey | Care Industry News

Councils forced to overspend by £600m to protect vulnerable children as cuts push services to ‘breaking point’ | The Independent


Funding cuts have pushed children’s social services to “breaking point” with action only being taken to protect youngsters once they are at imminent risk of harm, council leaders warn today. Painting a damning picture of the state of children’s social care, a report from the Local Government Association (LGA) says cuts to early intervention services have led to an “unprecedented surge” in demand for urgent child protection support.

Source: Councils forced to overspend by £600m to protect vulnerable children as cuts push services to ‘breaking point’ | The Independent

Call to local authorities to ensure extra social care money gets to frontline | Care Industry News


Regional care providers are urging their local authorities to ensure extra money announced in the budget actually gets through to frontline care services.

Source: Call to local authorities to ensure extra social care money gets to frontline | Care Industry News

Rise in council tax will be swallowed up by National Living Wage instead of footing social care bill | Care Industry News


Council tax rises in 2017/18 will not bring in enough money to prevent the need for further deep cuts to local services next year, the Local Government

Source: Rise in council tax will be swallowed up by National Living Wage instead of footing social care bill | Care Industry News