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The complicated legacy of the Pilgrims is finally coming to light 400 years after they landed in Plymouth : The Conversation


Descendants from the Pilgrims were keen to highlight their ancestors’ role in the country’s founding. But their sanitized version of events is only now starting to be told in full.

Source: The complicated legacy of the Pilgrims is finally coming to light 400 years after they landed in Plymouth : The Conversation

Statues topple and a Catholic church burns as California reckons with its Spanish colonial past : The Conversation


Statues of the Spanish missionary Junípero Serra have been toppled by protesters in LA, San Francisco and Sacramento. Californians are questioning whether Serra was a saint or a colonizer – or both.

Source: Statues topple and a Catholic church burns as California reckons with its Spanish colonial past : The Conversation

Oklahoma is – and always has been – Native land : The Conversation


The Supreme Court’s July 9 ruling that half of Oklahoma belongs to the Muscogee Nation confirms what Indigenous people already knew: North America is ‘Indian Country.’

Source: Oklahoma is – and always has been – Native land : The Conversation

‘That’s genocide’: ancient tribal graves threatened by Trump border wall | Environment | The Guardian


A historic graveyard and chapel lie within the barrier’s 150ft ‘enforcement zone’ that the government has said it plans to raze

Source: ‘That’s genocide’: ancient tribal graves threatened by Trump border wall | Environment | The Guardian

Remembering the US soldiers who refused orders to murder Native Americans at Sand Creek : The Conversation


Every Thanksgiving weekend for the past 18 years, Arapaho and Cheyenne youth lead a 180-mile relay from the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site to Denver.

The annual Sand Creek Massacre Spiritual Healing Run opens at the site of the Sand Creek Massacre near Eads, Colorado, with a sunrise ceremony honoring some 200 Arapaho and Cheyenne people who lost their lives in the infamous massacre. This brutal assault was carried out by Colonel John Chivington on Nov. 29, 1864.

While the Sand Creek massacre has been the subject of numerous books, much less attention has been given to two heroes of this horrific event: U.S. soldiers Captain Silas Soule and Lt. Joseph Cramer.

 

Source: Remembering the US soldiers who refused orders to murder Native Americans at Sand Creek : The Conversation

Why Native Americans struggle to protect their sacred places : The Conversation


Forty years ago the U.S. Congress passed the American Indian Religious Freedom Act so that Native Americans could practice their faith freely and that access to their sacred sites would be protected. This came after a 500-year-long history of conquest and coercive conversion to Christianity had forced Native Americans from their homelands.

Today, their religious practice is threatened all over again. On Dec. 4, 2017, the Trump administration reduced the Bears Ears National Monument, an area sacred to Native Americans in Utah, by over 1 million acres. Bears Ears Monument is only one example of the conflict over places of religious value. Many other such sacred sites are being viewed as potential areas for development, threatening the free practice of Native American faith.

While Congress created the American Indian Religious Freedom Act to provide “access to sacred sites,” it has been open to interpretation. Native Americans still struggle to protect their sacred lands.

Land-based religions

Native Americans have land-based religions, which means they practice their religion within specific geographic locations. As Joseph Toledo, a Jemez Pueblo tribal leader, says, sacred sites are like churches; they are “places of great healing and magnetism.”

Some of these places, as in the case of Bears Ears National Monument, are within federal public lands. As a Native American scholar, I have visited many of these places and felt their power.

For thousands of years, tribes have used Bears Ears for rituals, ceremonies and collecting medicines used for healing. The different tribes – the Hopi, Navajo, Ute Mountain Ute, Ute Indian Tribe and the Pueblo of Zuni – have worked to protect the land. Together they set up a nongovernmental organization, the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition to help conserve the landscape in 2015.

 

Source: Why Native Americans struggle to protect their sacred places : The Conversation

Why do so many Mormons back Trump? Some say it’s about the land | Environment | The GuardianMorm 


In February 2017, weeks after the inauguration of Donald Trump, a conservative political operative named Don Peay trudged up a steep, sagebrush-covered hillside outside Salt Lake City. Peay served as Trump’s campaign manager in Utah and is a hunting advocate who has gone out shooting with prominent rightwingers such as Dick Cheney, Ted Nugent and Donald Trump Jr.

Peay wanted to point out a particular parcel of public land that used to be overrun by highly invasive cheat grass. Several years ago, he worked with local land managers to revegetate it with native plants favored by deer and elk.

“We’re proud of what we’ve done here,” Peay said. “It shows that local people know the land better than bureaucrats from Washington or tourists from California.”

“Doesn’t it belong to all of us?” I asked, noting that the land we stood upon was managed by the federal government, in trust for the American people.

His answer was unexpected.

“Yeah,” he replied. “But it belongs more to me than it does to you.”

Peay is Mormon and his striking claims regarding public land have a long history in Utah. Under Trump, these claims are being taken seriously. Peay believes this helps explain high Mormon approval levels for the president despite the Stormy Daniels affair and other scandals that might be thought shocking to a conservative religious conscience.

 

Source: Why do so many Mormons back Trump? Some say it’s about the land | Environment | The Guardian

Trumpian White Supremacy Has it All Wrong : Counter Punch


I’m a white American, but like a majority of us, that’s only small part of the story.

In a country where the federal government is currently in the hands of so-called “nativists” like Trump and his white mostly male Republican Party backers only celebrate white roots, I like many of us have various genetic strands that include a little of what might best be called “diversity.” There is a touch of Native American on my mother’s side — hardly enough to qualify for inclusion in the Algonquin Nation, but enough to remind me and my siblings that our ancestors include both conquerers and the conquered.

Then too, while there is a direct line on both my mother’s side and my father’s side tracing back to the same Warren family that arrived on the Mayflower in 1620, there are also immigrants who came from Scotland (the Stewart Clan) and Ireland on my mother’s side, and from Germany (Kerpol) and England (the Plymptons and Lincolns) on my father’s.

For me, one of the most interesting roots is my great great grandfather, a Lindorff who left Sweden for G

 

Source: Trumpian White Supremacy Has it All Wrong : Counter Punch

Federal judge orders cancellation of Redskins’ trademark registrations


Original post from Washington Post

‘………….By Ian Shapira

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