New analysis reveals that 1 in 3 people living with dementia don’t get the NHS support they are supposed to : Age UK


With the number of people living with dementia estimated to hit 1 million by 2020, Age UK is warning of an urgent and growing need to provide much better support for those who have been told they have the condition.

Despite the fact that regularly reviewed care plans should be available for everyone living with dementia, new analysis from Age UK shows that over 1 in 3 people with dementia don’t have one. The Plans are important because they are the gateway to follow up support from the NHS, and they should also help ensure that other support a person may be receiving, such as social care, is properly joined up with NHS help for their dementia.

Age UK analysed data from 7,185 GP practices in England and found that, in total, 458,461 people had a recorded diagnosis of dementia in November 2017, but only 282,573 had a new care plan or at least one care plan review on record in the last year.

Yet NHS England’s Guidance says “there is an urgent need to ensure every person who has dementia has an individual care plan” and goes on to specify that these reviews should take place once every 12 months at the minimum. The plans are supposed to set out the tailored support someone should receive, and are meant to be reviewed regularly with a health professional as a person’s condition progresses and changes. Care plans are equally important for family members who are often providing significant amounts of

 

Source: New analysis reveals that 1 in 3 people living with dementia don’t get the NHS support they are supposed to : Age UK

Report

Hunt refusing interviews as NHS cancels all non-urgent ops and outpatients


In spite of public anger over the absence of Transport Secretary Chris Grayling today as a major increase in rail fares was announced, Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has refused requests for interviews as news broke that NHS England is telling hospitals to cancel all non-urgent operations and outpatient appointments for the whole month of January.

This is far from the first time that Hunt has gone ‘AWOL’ – or hidden – during an NHS crisis.

Last winter, as the NHS struggled through the 2016/17 winter crisis, Hunt disappeared for weeks before finally emerging to give a weak interview to the BBC in which he stated there were ‘no excuses’ for the NHS disaster – before making a list of excuses and blaming all kinds of things for it.

Except himself, of course.

Now, as hospitals all over England are told to cancel thousands of operations for a whole calendar month – on top of cancellations already made in December – the Department of Health (DH) has,

 

Source: Hunt refusing interviews as NHS cancels all non-urgent ops and outpatients

Stay well this winter as Public Health England urges people to get the flu jab | Care Industry News


People who are the most vulnerable to flu are being urged to get their free vaccination ahead of the winter period when the virus is most common.

Source: Stay well this winter as Public Health England urges people to get the flu jab | Care Industry News

NHS England » Personalised health and care framework


Health and high quality care for all, now and for future generations

Source: *NHS England » Personalised health and care framework

            *Integrated Personal Commissioning (IPC)

 

Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

‘This is the ultimate slap in the face’ – Daily Record


A soldier who lost his legs in Afghanistan will no longer get treatment in England – because he’s Scottish.

Callum Brown, 28, still endures horrific pain from injuries caused by a bomb blast six years ago.

But now the former soldier is to lose the treatment and medication he has relied on.

He said yesterday: “I am sitting here without my legs because I fought for this country.

“This is the ultimate slap in the face. I am still in shock and can barely get my head around it.”

Former lance corporal Callum, from Ayr, has been under the care of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham.

The hospital, where he was treated when he was first airlifted home, has dedicated and specialised facilities for military casualties.

But on his last visit, he and wife Laura were stunned to be told he could no longer go there because he doesn’t live in England.

Callum fears the decision could even cost him his life because he will no longer have access to the specialist treatment available at the hospital.

e’ Former soldier lost his legs in Afghanistan but English hospital will no longer treat him because he’s Scottish – Daily Record

‘Too many’ patients locked in for mental health care | DisabledGo News and Blog


Too many patients are locked into mental health rehabilitation wards far from home, a review of England’s psychiatric services suggests. The Care Quality Commission said there were 3,500 beds in locked facilities across the country, but it believes more people could and should get care in residential settings close to home. The report said safety on mental health wards was another major concern. NHS England said progress was being made with higher funding for care. ‘Kept in for 341 days’ Claire Murdoch, head of mental health for NHS England, added that while there were reasons for optimism, improvements – in line with the priorities set out by the NHS five-year plan – were needed. The Care Quality Commission (CQC) looked at all specialist mental health services across England – inspecting NHS care and services provided by the independent sector. It said almost all services were rated as good or outstanding for having caring and compassionate staff and that there were many examples of

Source: ‘Too many’ patients locked in for mental health care | DisabledGo News and Blog

NHS transformation plans: Cuts or change for better? | DisabledGo News and Blog


The process has been bubbling along beneath the radar for months. The Sustainability and Transformation Plans (STPs) across the NHS in England have been overshadowed by controversy, with critics arguing they are part of a secret cuts agenda. Each of 44 areas of England was asked to come up with a plan to make the best use of resources at a time of rising patient demand, with one of the main aims being to maximise the provision of care outside hospitals and closer to a patient’s home. Now an NHS leader has come out for the first time to defend the exercise. Sir Bruce Keogh, Medical Director of NHS England, has given an exclusive interview to BBC News. He stressed the STP process was all about meeting the needs of an ageing population with more complex conditions and making the best use of medical advances. “That in some cases will mean offering highly specialised services in a more centralised way,” he said. “In other cases will mean bringing some of those services that are currently

Source: NHS transformation plans: Cuts or change for better? | DisabledGo News and Blog