Archives for posts with tag: NHS

A good question for in the Tories austerity campaign there appears to be no room for manoeuvre to allow any reasonable adjustments for disabled people.

Will any existing European Union legislation be maintained into UK law and furthermore will EU legislation coming through be also included. Without these current and forthcoming EU legislations the outlook for disabled people will be even more depressing and unequal as it is already.

All of the UK needs to unify behind ensuring that disabled people now and after Brexit are not abandoned by this Tory Government, as you may also become disabled within your lifetime. Think of others like you would for yourself and your own family, otherwise the life for disabled will be far worse than it is now and now is not as good as it should be.

Britain Isn't Eating

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By Chris Ham

In the 40 or more years I have worked with and for the NHS, I can’t remember a time when the government of the day has been so unwilling to act on credible evidence of service and funding pressures. On three previous occasions – 1974, 1988 and 2000 – Conservative and Labour governments heeded warnings of an impending crisis, and found extra resources, often substantial, to maintain and improve care. Why then has the current government turned a deaf ear to the entreaties to provide extra funding from the National Audit Office, the Care Quality Commission, the royal medical colleges, and many others?

Against the backdrop of a decade of austerity stemming from the financial crash of 2007, four explanations suggest themselves. The first is that the government is preoccupied with Brexit and has little time to address other pressing issues such as schools’ funding, housing shortages, resources to fight crime, and growing evidence of distress in the NHS and social care. Whereas in ‘normal’ times all these issues would be receiving widespread news coverage and sustained attention in Whitehall, the outcome of the EU referendum means that Brexit is preventing this happening.

The second explanation is that economic uncertainty linked to Brexit has limited the Chancellor’s room for manoeuvre. Specifically, with progress on the Brexit negotiations proceeding slowly, and an increasing possibility of no deal being reached, the Treasury will not want to commit to public spending rises to avoid being boxed in when the outcome of the negotiations is known.

The third explanation is that the government is not persuaded that an NHS crisis is around the corner. Some ministers take an even tougher line, believing that there is considerable scope to increase NHS efficiency and that this will only happen when leaders in the NHS realise that more money will not be found. Arguments that the NHS is a bottomless pit and will use whatever funding is provided and keep on coming back for more may not be a common view among the current crop of ministers but nor is it an exceptional view.

The fourth explanation is that neither the current Prime Minister nor her Chancellor share the commitment to the NHS of their immediate predecessors. David Cameron’s gratitude to the NHS for the care given to his family is a matter of public record and George Osborne’s support was evident in the additional funding made available in the last Spending Review. Both were involved with Jeremy Hunt in the appointment of Simon Stevens as head of NHS England and all of these individuals worked to the same agenda, based on the NHS five year forward view.

The outcome of the referendum tore this alliance asunder and the consequences were evident in the well-publicised spat between Stevens and No.10 earlier this year. Since then a modus vivendi has been re-established although whether it will survive Stevens’ recent warnings about the impact of continuing financial constraints remains to be seen. What is clear is that there are significant risks for the government in ignoring these and other warnings in view of the attachment the public feels towards the NHS and evidence that services are stretched to the limits.

What might unblock the current impasse? When I worked in the Department of Health between 2000 and 2004, I learnt that public attitudes towards the NHS are tracked closely and taken seriously by ministers. Judging by the annual British Social Attitudes (BSA) survey, the public remain positive about the NHS with satisfaction levels near an all-time high. The survey is, however, a lagging indicator, and recent Ipsos MORI polling reveals rising public concern about the NHS and fears that its performance will deteriorate.

If these fears materialise, the government may feel impelled to act but by that stage so much damage will have been done to services that it will be difficult to reverse the decline. Far better to intervene now and find the additional funding The King’s Fund and others have argued is necessary (£4 billion in 2018/19 as a down-payment on meeting a funding gap we estimate at £20 billion by 2022/23 based on current spending plans) thereby demonstrating that the NHS really is safe in this government’s hands.

A former Conservative Chancellor, Nigel Lawson, famously said that to govern is to choose. For Philip Hammond, the moment of choice is approaching rapidly, and on this occasion it will have far reaching implications both for the government and for the public for whom the NHS remains a treasured institution.

 

Source : The Budget: is the government listening? : The King’s Fund


The NHS is worth fighting for, for if it fails we will regress to pre 1948 facilities, where it was no money no life.

Govt Newspeak

A 94-year-old WWII veteran silences a TV studio with his harrowing two-minute account of life before the NHS [VIDEO]

Harry Leslie Smith is a 94-year-old veteran of World War II, and knew the hardship of life before the NHS. In an interview for the Russell Howard’s Good News show, his two-minute tale of the life and death of his disabled sister made the case for the NHS better than anyone.

From workhouse infirmary to paupers’ pit

Describing life before the NHS, Smith explains that only those with enough money could see a doctor or go to the hospital. Everyone else was at the mercy of “local cures”, which were useless against the most common diseases of the time, like tuberculosis. When his sister Marion contracted the disease, the family could not afford to get her medical treatment.

With Marion disabled by the disease, the family had no access to a wheelchair either, so they pushed her around in a cart made of bamboo. Smith remembers sharing the cart with…

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LGA RESPONDS TO NHS CHIEF EXECUTIVE SIMON STEVENS’ SPEECH

Responding to NHS Chief Executive Simon Stevens’ speech to the NHS Providers conference, Cllr Izzi Seccombe, Chairman of the Local Government Association’s Community Wellbeing Board, said:

There cannot be a sustainable NHS without a sustainable adult social care system.

“Adult social care services provide invaluable care and support for older and disabled people.

“Investing in social care keeps people out of hospital and living independent, dignified lives at home and in the community. It is the single best investment to alleviate pressure on our vital NHS services.

“Social care services face an annual funding gap of £2.3 billion by 2020. Councils have long-argued that it is a false economy to pump money into the NHS whilst leaving social care chronically underfunded.

“While local government will have managed reductions to its core funding from central government totalling £16 billion between 2010 and 2020, we estimate that NHS spending will have increased by just under £20 billion over the same period.

“As a nation we urgently need to recognise the importance of adult social care and prevention of poor health. We need to shift perceptions and make adult social care just as important in the public eye and within government as the NHS.

“The Government should use this month’s Autumn Budget to set out how it plans to tackle the crisis in adult social care as well as the NHS to deliver a long-term sustainable solution that works for adults of all ages.

“We are also calling on the Government to reverse the planned cuts to councils’ public health budgets and renew its commitment to prevention as a fundamental priority of its health policy.”

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...Source : There cannot be a sustainable NHS without a sustainable adult social care system : Care Industry News


Politics and Insights

Simon Stevens, NHS England boss

Simon Stevens, the chief executive of NHS England has launched a scathing attack on government spending in an extraordinary conference speech, outlining that the NHS has a significant funding problem’.  He says the health service should get the cash boost it was promised during the EU referendum. 

Speaking at the NHS Providers conference in Birmingham, Stevens said failure to increase funding would add at least one million people to NHS waiting lists by 2021.

He warned that cancer care and mental health services could deteriorate, and the waiting list for hospital operations hit 5m, because ministers are giving the services billions less than it needs. 

In an impassioned speech, Stevens urged the prime minsiter to give the NHS in England at least £4bn more in 2018-19 – eight times more than currently proposed – in the budget Philip Hammond will deliver on 22 November. Stevens fired the controversial claims used by…

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THE stream of Nigerian women jetting into Britain to give birth at the NHS’s expense is so endless that maternity staff jokingly refer to them arriving on “The Lagos Shuttle”.

Source: Investigation reveals shocking scale of foreign births on the NHS each year | Express Comment | Comment | Express.co.uk


Dentists warn that thousands of vulnerable people are wrongly being fined over dental treatment.

Source: ‘Go to the dentist and get fined £100’ – BBC News


As you say this is exceedingly worrying, especially as there is, currently, a shortage of NHS Dentists.

However, do these young dentists realise that if there is a sudden large influx of dentists into the private sector then this could diminish the profits they wish to receive. In many ways a constant flow of regular guaranteed income is more beneficial that the possibility of some form of private income. There is supply and demand in all areas and this applies to the private sector in the same ways as the public sector.

That been said any decisions for anyone to leave the NHS is not at all good for those of us who have to rely on the NHS as we do not have the funds to go private.

There is a need to keep a check on quality but are targets the best way, for when you are concentrating on meeting certain targets your attention could be diverted away from other areas, which are as of equal importance, but no targets have been set.
I do worry regarding the constant push in the NHS to privatisation, as will be the case in dentistry should there be a further reduction in available dentists this does not mean the population will follow them to the private sector, they will most likely not visit the dentists. In the longer term this will then create more pressures on an already pressurised NHS leading to a serious decline in the health if persons within the UK. This will then have a disastrous effect on employment and the attendance rates, which in turn will create a lack of sustainability in the economy of the UK. Everything is interrelated from birth to death and all the levels in between.

Beastrabban\'s Weblog

I found this very worrying article by Rachel Burnett in Monday’s I, for the 2nd October 2017. Entitled ‘NHS dentistry facing ‘existential crisis’ with majority set to leave, it reads

More than half of dentists are planning to leave the NHS within the next five years, a survey has found.

A study by the British Dental Association (BDA) has revealed that around 58 per cent want to move on, mostly to private work. Others want to go overseas, retire or to move out of dentistry.

It also found that 53 per cent of young and newly qualified NHS dentists, aged under 35, plan to leave.

Henrik Overgaard, BDA chairman of General Dental Practice, called for government reforms to avoid a “crisis”.

He said: “These young dentists are the backbone of the dental workforce, and losing them at the start of their careers raises existential questions about the future of…

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I agree with most of this post, however, in my 60 odd years of life on this earth I have found that there are not many politicians in who you can believe in, be they red, blue, green, purple, orange, yellow and others. However, there are some in which there is some form of belief and others practically none. They all promise the earth and unfound riches in their manifestos and only when they assume power can the truths be revealed.

You cast your vote and hope for the best.

Regarding Brexit nothing has come forth as we have not Brexited and will not be doing so until March 2019 or may be not, depending on whether there will be a transition deal or not.

Everything is so up in the air and no one on either side in the UK or Europe can be sure of the final outcome. We can all speculate on what the outcome or outcomes will or can be and who will be in power if and when we do or not do Brexit.

That length of string is getting longer or is it shorter, day by day.

Beastrabban\'s Weblog

This is another fascinating little video from RT’s Going Underground. Host Afshin Rattansi talks to the former cabinet minister under Blair, Chris Smith, above his decision to oppose the Invasion of Iraq, his work in the Advertising Standards Authority, and Brexit.

Smith was Blair’s Culture Secretary, and the author of a book, Creative Britain. The cover showed him wielding a professional movie/TV camera. He states he opposed the Iraq invasion because it was ‘obviously the wrong the policy’. He also states that during his time with the Advertising Standards Authority, people wrote in asking them if they could possibly act against the misleading political advertising in elections. Smith states that this is sadly impossible. Their constitution limits them to commercial advertising only, and they have no power to prosecute or punishment politicians that lie.

On the subject of Brexit, he and Rattansi clearly hold different views. Smith appears…

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The Tory manufactured NHS crisis continued this week with the Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, slapping hard-working, stressed-out, NHS medical professionals in the face (yet again). The widely-despised Tory Health Secretary revealed his latest ingenious ‘money-saving’ (definitely not privatisation-related) scheme – this time the plan was to replace your local GP with a cheaper, much less […]

Source: Jeremy Hunt to replace GPs with far less qualified, cheaper alternative, ‘Physician Associates’ | Evolve Politics

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