Theresa May admits country is ‘in crisis’


Yes, it is a crisis, but a crisis of many, health and then Social Care are two others and neither are being dealt with effectively, especially that within Social Care.

With this in mind I have a Petition – Pay all employed carers the Living Wage, which would go some way to reverse the crisis in Social Care and thereby not extending and increasing the crisis within health.

Please therefore see the following

You may be aware that there is a crisis within Social Care, an even greater crisis than that within health. This because a crisis in Social Care will have a great impact on health making the health crisis even greater.

Please could you consider supporting the Petition – Pay all employed carers the Living Wage. Petition link https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/236151

I am involved in a Petition project based on the Care Workers within the Care Industry.

This industry is in crisis, as is the Health Service, but within Social Care this crisis is even greater. This in turn will create even more pressure on all aspects of the Health Service. Therefore, action is needed to minimise the Social Care crisis and pay paid carers a reasonable wage is one of these actions, so there is now a petition.

Please, therefore, could you support the Petition – Pay all employed carers the Living Wage Flash, (Families Lobbying & Advising Sheffield), a group of family carers of relatives with Learning Disabilities and/or Autism in Sheffield are concerned at the state of Social Care, not only in Sheffield, but throughout the UK.

We all know that there is a major crisis in Social Care not just in Sheffield, but all over the UK. This is in a large part due to the lack of persons willing to come into the Care Industry, of which the low pay is a prime factor.

Parliament are aware and have formed a Cross Party Committee to look at funding, recruitment and pay for Care Workers in the Care Industry.

The Government currently have a recruitment campaign for the Care Industry ‘Every Day is Different’ https://carervoice.wordpress.com/2019/02/22/new-campaign-to-recruit-thousands-more-adult-social-care-staff-gov-uk/comment-page-1/#comment-57 .

However, there is no mention of pay.

Please therefore, could you consider the following #pay #employed #wage#funding #government#serviceproviders #living

Could you look at promoting the Petition – ‘Pay all employed carers the Living Wage, created by FLASh (Families Lobbying & Advising Sheffield).

Petition link https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/236151

Please sign this Petition, however, until you then click the signature verification link in the resulting email your signature will not be valid and will therefore not count re supporting the Petition cause.

More information https://1drv.ms/w/s!Aq2MsYduiazglWxA60JAY_2cpvN8

We need this Tory Government to end Austerity Cuts to Local Authorities and then increase the Grants to these Authorities so they can fund Care Service Providers to be able to pay their care workers at least the Living Wage.

Please also see the HFT report ‘Sector Pulse Check’, https://1drv.ms/w/s!Aq2MsYduiazglXuM7Duz6HOYXvsv

The care sector needs to recruit 128,000 new workers each year to replace those who retire or leave, new research has found.

The study (http://careassociationalliance.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Care-Association-Alliance-Social-care-Workforce-Analysis-2018.pdf) by the Care Association Alliance and law firm Royds Withy King found that one in three workers leave the sector every year – the highest turnover rate of all job sectors in the UK.

If the Petition attains 10,000 signatures, the Government will respond and if 100,000 signatures, it will be considered for debate in Parliament.

Please support and share with your work colleagues, family & friends, Social Media, MP and Local Councillors.

For any further information Chris can be contacted on carervoice@gmail.com

Thank of you

Chris Sterry
Vice-chair of FLASh

‘I’d vote Leave more emphatically than in 2016’: Three farmers on why they still back Brexit : i News


In the 2016 referendum, many British farmers voted to leave the European Union.

Now, nearly three years and countless stories about the potential implications of Brexit later, it would not be surprising if some had changed their mind.

Not Andrew Geary, though. He would vote Leave all over again – and with more conviction than before.

“I would vote Leave probably more emphatically now than I did in 2016,” the cattle farmer tells i. “Not because I believe there is anything I have learned that has changed my mind, but just seeing the contemptuous way in which the European Union has treated this country since it took the vote to Leave, effectively wanting to stick two fingers up and making out it doesn’t want a deal with us.

“If truth be known, they’ve got far more to lose by not being with us than we as a country have got to lose by not dealing with them.”

Source: ‘I’d vote Leave more emphatically than in 2016’: Three farmers on why they still back Brexit : i News

Brexit latest: Leadsom EXPLODED at ‘KAMIKAZE’ Remainers in Cabinet over EU row – REVEALED | Politics | News | Express.co.uk


Liz Truss, chief secretary to the Treasury, attacked her Conservative colleagues Amber Rudd, Greg Clark and David Gauke after the Brexit-rejecting trio penned a weekend newspaper column demanding Theresa May rules out no-deal. Mrs Truss said their article was Brexit “kamikaze” before Andrea Leadsom joined in the scolding. One source said Mrs Leadsom shouted in anger at the “disgraceful” Remainers as she “could barely conceal her anger” at the rebel triumverate’s betrayal of Theresa May.

 

Source: Brexit latest: Leadsom EXPLODED at ‘KAMIKAZE’ Remainers in Cabinet over EU row – REVEALED | Politics | News | Express.co.uk

Would a Norway option break the Brexit stalemate? Here’s what new polling tells us : The Conversation


The Labour politician Jim Callaghan famously remarked to his colleagues in 1970 that a referendum on Europe might end up being “a little rubber life raft” into which they all might one day have to climb. Just five years later they did so, holding a vote that ensured the UK remained a member of what was then the EEC for more than four decades.

The decision taken two-and-a-half years ago in the 2016 referendum reversed the verdict the public arrived at back in 1975. But so controversial has it become, and so difficult to implement, that many are calling for what would be a third “people’s vote”.

Opposition to another referendum is intense – and not just among those desperate to see the UK leave the EU. Many who would, in their heart of hearts, prefer to remain in the EU worry that seeking to overturn the 2016 result would send a damaging message to “the people”.

For some, the so-called Norway-plus option, which would see the UK remain in the customs union and the single market, is now the safest life raft available. Prime Minister Theresa May has lost the meaningful vote, and it is increasingly clear that parliament, by hook or by crook, is going to do its damnedest to prevent a no-deal departure. We can therefore expect to hear a lot more in the coming days about Norway-plus – and about the EEA, EFTA, “cross-party consensus”, and a so-called “soft” (or “softer”) Brexit.

Whether any of this is feasible – at least in the time available and with May still prime minister – who knows? But what we do know is that, if it is to stand any chance of working, then advocates of the Norway-plus option are going to have to work very hard and very fast to persuade both the public and the members of Britain’s two biggest political parties that it’s something worth trying. How much chance do they have?

Party members

Just before Christmas, Our ESRC-sponsored Party Members Projectsurveyed 1,034 Labour Party members and 1,215 Conservative Party members, together with a representative sample of 1,675 ordinary voters. We asked all three groups of respondents how they would feel if Britain “ended up leaving the European Union but remaining in the single market and customs union – an arrangement that is sometimes called Norway-plus”. Their answers suggest the latter won’t necessarily be an easy sell – but that it shouldn’t be written off.

 

Source: Would a Norway option break the Brexit stalemate? Here’s what new polling tells us : The Conversation

EU again rules out reworking Brexit deal | Reuters


BRUSSELS (Reuters) – The European Commission repeated on Monday that EU leaders would not renegotiate a Brexit treaty agreed last month with Prime Minister Theresa May and was pressing on with planning for Britain to crash out of the Union without a deal.

 

Source: EU again rules out reworking Brexit deal | Reuters

Ireland wants hundreds of millions in EU aid to mitigate damage of no-deal Brexit : The Telegraph


The Irish government will demand hundreds of millions of euros in emergency aid from Brussels if there is a no-deal Brexit.

Dublin has told European Commission officials it will apply for the cash to mitigate the impact of no deal on its beef, dairy and fishing sectors, the Irish Independent reported on Thursday.

“You’re looking at hundreds of millions here. Between the beef industry and the fishing industry we’re talking mega-money,” said Michael Creed, the agriculture minister.

Mr Creed told the Irish independent that drops in the value of sterling because of uncertainty around Brexit had hit the Irish food sector, which is highly dependent on the British market.

“A hard Brexit would make that look like a teddy bears’ picnic,” he said.

Ireland is the EU country apart from the UK which is most exposed to the economic risk of a no-deal Brexit. Britain takes half of annual Irish beef exports and 80,000 tonnes of cheddar a year, and one-third of the fish in value terms caught by Irish boats comes from UK waters.

The EU is infamous for its Common Agricultural Policy, a complex and inefficient web of agricultural subsidies and grants, which is worth billions of euros every year. It also has funds to aid the agricultural sector in emergency situations, which it has deployed in the past.

 

Source: Ireland wants hundreds of millions in EU aid to mitigate damage of no-deal Brexit : The Telegraph

Our survey. Support for No Deal hardens as it becomes more likely. | Conservative Home


 

Source: Our survey. Support for No Deal hardens as it becomes more likely. | Conservative Home

No-deal Brexit: survey reveals 44% of people expect the UK to crash out of EU : The Conversation


As the Brexit negotiations grind on, and with a withdrawal agreement still seeming elusive, the British people are becoming more pessimistic about what Brexit might mean. A major new survey by the Policy Institute at King’s College London and Ipsos MORI reveals that nearly half (44%) expect the UK to leave the EU in March 2019 without a deal in place. Only three in ten expect a deal to be worked out.

If we break the population down by party support and preference on Brexit, other fascinating distinctions become apparent. The majority of Remain-backing Labour voters think the UK is heading for a no-deal Brexit, while the majority of Conservative-Leave supporters think the country will leave with a deal.

Strikingly, whatever the outcome of the negotiations, few see much personal economic benefit flowing from Brexit. Only 14% of the public expect that leaving the EU will result in an increase in their own standard of living in the next five years, with twice as many expecting their standard of living to decrease. The public have become more pessimistic since we last asked this question in May 2016, just before the referendum

 

Source: No-deal Brexit: survey reveals 44% of people expect the UK to crash out of EU : The Conversation

Henry Newman: How to manage No Deal? To start with, pledge to reduce tariffs. | Conservative Home


Another alternative, any comments?

61chrissterry

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Brexit negotiations are stalled. Only one issue matters – the Irish backstop. Despite all the drama and noises off about Chequers, “Norway for now”, and Super Canada, none of that matters if we cannot agree a divorce. And, unless the EU shifts tack, the only path to an orderly divorce is via the backstop. So we are facing down a growing risk of No Deal. No Deal could mean tariffs on trade with our largest partner – the EU. So, the Government should commit now to reduce our overall tariffs in the event of No Deal.

No Deal should be nobody’s preferred option. It would mean significant disruption. Aviation, haulage and transport, citizen’s rights, and many other areas would potentially be affected. Almost by definition it would suggest that relations across the Continent had broken down – the political and strategic effects could be profound.

But there might be little choice if the alternative would mean a backstop which threatens the long-term integrity of the United Kingdom. So what would it mean in economic terms? Open Europe’s analysis, published yesterday, reveals that in the medium term the static macroeconomic effects of No Deal would be material but relatively small. GDP growth would be affected – down an estimated 2.2 per cent by 2030.

Our model considers the cost of tariffs with the EU, as well as costs for customs and other non-tariff barriers. But despite these new costs, we found that No Deal would not be the biggest determinant of our prosperity over that period. Over the medium term up to 2030 the UK economy would continue to grow by around 30 per cent, even in the event of No Deal. Our research is in line with findings by the LSE, PwC and the OBR. Yes, other people have come up with bigger numbers, including the Treasury, but they have thrown in other effects which are much harder to model successfully.

What our research also shows is that the Government could take action to mitigate some of the medium-term effects of No Deal. If we left without a deal, there would be tariffs payable on our trade with the EU under WTO rules. (Britain can’t just choose not to levy tariffs on European trade). But we can change our overall tariff regime. Although our WTO commitments impose a maximum level on tariffs which can be charged with any member state, it’s open to the UK to charge less as long as they do this on a most-favoured nation basis. WTO commitments are a ceiling not a floor.

So in our No Deal report Open Europe looked at the effect of lowering all our tariffs on industrial and manufactured goods to zero (and we phased in reductions on agricultural goods). We then also improved our openness to services trade and foreign investment (we moved the UK to “best in class” levels). These steps – which the UK could do without any negotiation – would dramatically reduce the impact of No Deal. Our model suggests that the macroeconomic effect over the same period up to 2030 would be reduced from a 2.2 per cent to 0.5 per cent drag on growth.

 

Source: Henry Newman: How to manage No Deal? To start with, pledge to reduce tariffs. | Conservative Home