The Trumpian EU has demolished its final reasons for existing


The EU has showed what it really is a ‘bully’ and its complete disregard for for anyone who does not agree with it 100%.

This instance is not the first for there are a number, such as the treatment of Greece from 2009.

But, in the current instance not only was the UK and Northern Ireland

aggrieved, but also many countries within the EU, Ireland for one

The EU needs to understand that it should discuss, and not govern dictatorially, but they have had years doing the latter and rarely challenged by EU member countries, with the possible exception of the UK, while it was a member.

Source: The Trumpian EU has demolished its final reasons for existing

Brexit could cause break-up of UK, says ex-Chancellor George Osborne | Daily Mail Online


So, George Osbourne, former Chancellor of the Exchequer, is saying Brexit could be the cause of the break up of the UK, well, if it is then so be it.

But, it is not Brexit, but the actions of previous Governments, with Brexit being the easiest reason to put forward, for previous Governments, be they Labour or Conservative, could not be the cause, could they!

George was never in favour of Brexit, but, then, I was never in favour of George.

Brexit will, eventually, be good for England and any other country within the UK who stays with England.

As to Brexit, I did vote to leave and my conviction to do so, is only strengthened more each day, when I see how the EU is prolonging the discussions on the terms of a Trade Deal between the UK and the EU, for they only wish to punish the UK for daring to leave the EU and to show others who are not happy being in the EU, how they would be treated, if they wished to leave,

What I would say, is if I had known in 1975 what I know now I would have voted to leave then, instead, I mistakenly voted to stay in 1975, my worst vote ever.

Goodbye EU, but hello Europe, for we wish to trade with Europe not the EU.

 

Source: Brexit could cause break-up of UK, says ex-Chancellor George Osborne | Daily Mail Online

Explainer: Europe’s coronavirus smartphone contact tracing apps – Reuters


BERLIN (Reuters) – More than 20 countries and territories in Europe have launched or plan smartphone apps that seek to break the chain of coronavirus infection by tracking encounters between people and issuing a warning should one of them test positive.

 

Source: Explainer: Europe’s coronavirus smartphone contact tracing apps – Reuters

Would the EU abandon Varadkar? Perhaps. But it’s not at all likely. | Conservative Home


Throughout Brexit, there have been two apparently fixed points on the EU side of the negotiations. The first was their remarkable cohesion, in the face of a deeply divided British political class, and the second was their solidarity with Dublin.

As this Government’s efforts to negotiate Brexit reach their apparent nadir, it is worth paying attention to the other side of the table and noting that something appears to have shifted this week, at least with regards to the former point.

The apparent willingness of certain EU leaders to go for ‘no deal’, rather than endlessly indulging Parliament with a series of extensions in which it can continue to vote down the Withdrawal Agreement, seems to contradict the Union’s policy of catering to the particular needs of the Republic of Ireland.

Whilst the EU is perfectly willing to roll out the high-minded rhetoric about the vital importance of an invisible border whilst attempting to persuade the UK to adopt the backstop, it seems improbable that they would content to allow unregulated goods to flood into the Single Market through Northern Ireland in the event of no-deal.

 

Source: Would the EU abandon Varadkar? Perhaps. But it’s not at all likely. | Conservative Home

Ireland wants hundreds of millions in EU aid to mitigate damage of no-deal Brexit : The Telegraph


The Irish government will demand hundreds of millions of euros in emergency aid from Brussels if there is a no-deal Brexit.

Dublin has told European Commission officials it will apply for the cash to mitigate the impact of no deal on its beef, dairy and fishing sectors, the Irish Independent reported on Thursday.

“You’re looking at hundreds of millions here. Between the beef industry and the fishing industry we’re talking mega-money,” said Michael Creed, the agriculture minister.

Mr Creed told the Irish independent that drops in the value of sterling because of uncertainty around Brexit had hit the Irish food sector, which is highly dependent on the British market.

“A hard Brexit would make that look like a teddy bears’ picnic,” he said.

Ireland is the EU country apart from the UK which is most exposed to the economic risk of a no-deal Brexit. Britain takes half of annual Irish beef exports and 80,000 tonnes of cheddar a year, and one-third of the fish in value terms caught by Irish boats comes from UK waters.

The EU is infamous for its Common Agricultural Policy, a complex and inefficient web of agricultural subsidies and grants, which is worth billions of euros every year. It also has funds to aid the agricultural sector in emergency situations, which it has deployed in the past.

 

Source: Ireland wants hundreds of millions in EU aid to mitigate damage of no-deal Brexit : The Telegraph

Breaking: May’s legal advice confirms UK can only exit with EU’s ok | The SKWAWKBOX


Theresa May has published information on the legal advice the government received on the implications of her withdrawal ‘deal’ with the EU.

Two sections of the information made available are likely to spell the end of her career and probably of her government.

Page 26 of the document spells out that the agreement has no firm end date or ‘any provision for its termination’ – and that the UK has no power to extricate itself from the agreement without the EU’s agreement:

 

Source: Breaking: May’s legal advice confirms UK can only exit with EU’s ok | The SKWAWKBOX

Thong protest in Belfast raises concerns over rape trials | UK news | The Guardian


It was a mere scrap of fabric, deep blue and edged with lace. But when the legislator Ruth Coppinger drew it from her sleeve and held it up in the Irish parliament this week, the item of women’s underwear caused consternation among her colleagues.

Elsewhere, women took to the streets carrying lingerie. In Cork, dozens of thongs were laid on the steps of the courthouse. In Belfast on Thursday, protesters tied knickers to placards and chanted: “My little black dress does not mean yes.”

Thousands of women posted pictures of their underwear on Twitter under the hashtags #IBelieveHer and #ThisIsNotConsent.

The trigger for protests across Ireland, and the eruption of fury on social media, was the words of a lawyer defending a man accused of rape in a trial in Cork.

Suggesting the complainant – 17-year-old woman – was “open to meeting someone”, Elizabeth O’Connell said: “You have to look at the way she was dressed. She was wearing a thong with a lace front.”

The defendant was acquitted in a unanimous verdict following deliberations by the jury lasting 90 minutes.

According to Fiona Ryan, a city councillor in Cork, anger over the defence counsel’s comments on 6 November took a few days to build.

“It didn’t blow up at first, it was almost a delayed reaction. But it festered,” she said. Ryan suggested staging a protest in Cork on Wednesday, eight days after the end of the trial, and was astonished when up to 500 people turned up to take part, many carrying items of underwear.

 

Source: Thong protest in Belfast raises concerns over rape trials | UK news | The Guardian

Henry Newman: How to manage No Deal? To start with, pledge to reduce tariffs. | Conservative Home


Another alternative, any comments?

61chrissterry

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Brexit negotiations are stalled. Only one issue matters – the Irish backstop. Despite all the drama and noises off about Chequers, “Norway for now”, and Super Canada, none of that matters if we cannot agree a divorce. And, unless the EU shifts tack, the only path to an orderly divorce is via the backstop. So we are facing down a growing risk of No Deal. No Deal could mean tariffs on trade with our largest partner – the EU. So, the Government should commit now to reduce our overall tariffs in the event of No Deal.

No Deal should be nobody’s preferred option. It would mean significant disruption. Aviation, haulage and transport, citizen’s rights, and many other areas would potentially be affected. Almost by definition it would suggest that relations across the Continent had broken down – the political and strategic effects could be profound.

But there might be little choice if the alternative would mean a backstop which threatens the long-term integrity of the United Kingdom. So what would it mean in economic terms? Open Europe’s analysis, published yesterday, reveals that in the medium term the static macroeconomic effects of No Deal would be material but relatively small. GDP growth would be affected – down an estimated 2.2 per cent by 2030.

Our model considers the cost of tariffs with the EU, as well as costs for customs and other non-tariff barriers. But despite these new costs, we found that No Deal would not be the biggest determinant of our prosperity over that period. Over the medium term up to 2030 the UK economy would continue to grow by around 30 per cent, even in the event of No Deal. Our research is in line with findings by the LSE, PwC and the OBR. Yes, other people have come up with bigger numbers, including the Treasury, but they have thrown in other effects which are much harder to model successfully.

What our research also shows is that the Government could take action to mitigate some of the medium-term effects of No Deal. If we left without a deal, there would be tariffs payable on our trade with the EU under WTO rules. (Britain can’t just choose not to levy tariffs on European trade). But we can change our overall tariff regime. Although our WTO commitments impose a maximum level on tariffs which can be charged with any member state, it’s open to the UK to charge less as long as they do this on a most-favoured nation basis. WTO commitments are a ceiling not a floor.

So in our No Deal report Open Europe looked at the effect of lowering all our tariffs on industrial and manufactured goods to zero (and we phased in reductions on agricultural goods). We then also improved our openness to services trade and foreign investment (we moved the UK to “best in class” levels). These steps – which the UK could do without any negotiation – would dramatically reduce the impact of No Deal. Our model suggests that the macroeconomic effect over the same period up to 2030 would be reduced from a 2.2 per cent to 0.5 per cent drag on growth.

 

Source: Henry Newman: How to manage No Deal? To start with, pledge to reduce tariffs. | Conservative Home

A Brexit alternative for the Cabinet today | Conservative Home


Is the below mentioned a reasonable alternative, has suggested, what are your views?

61chrissterry


The Cabinet meets this morning.  Its members will wonder whether No Deal is now inevitable.  Perhaps the EU is now so set on carving up our country in any settlement that a collapse of the talks cannot be avoided.  But there is a potential escape route.

The EU’s support for the backstop is only one of many problems in the wider negotiation.  These cluster around the Prime Minister’s Chequers scheme, which was unequivocally rejected at Salzburg last month.  As the EU sees it, Chequers, with its core proposal to harmonise goods but not services with EU regulation, would breach the four freedoms of movement of goods, services capital, and workers; threaten the unity of its internal market, and potentially undercut EU27 businesses.

Were the backstop to be reduced to the onlydifficulty in the talks, it is possible to imagine that the EU would move to resolve it.

This is what would happen were Theresa May to take up a solution that the EU itself has offered – namely a Canada-style settlement.  Donald Tusk proposed it last spring.  “It should come as no surprise that the only remaining possible model is a free trade agreement,” he wrote.  “I hope that it will be ambitious and advanced – and we will do our best, as we did with other partners, such as Canada recently – but anyway it will only be a trade agreement.  I propose that we aim for a trade agreement covering all sectors and with zero tariffs on goods. Like other free trade agreements, it should address services.”

 

Source: A Brexit alternative for the Cabinet today | Conservative Home

Brexit news: EU to secure Theresa May’s leadership with MAJOR concession over Irish border | UK | News | Express.co.uk


The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier is secretly planning to accept a frictionless Irish border after Brexit, and therefore allow the use of technology to minimise border checks between Northern Ireland and the Republic.

Brussel’s sign of flexibility was outlined in confidential diplomatic notes detailing talks held between EU ambassadors last Wednesday.

The confidential document, seen by The Times, stated: “The biggest unsolved problem is Northern Ireland.

“There is a political mobilisation in the UK in this regard.

 

Source: Brexit news: EU to secure Theresa May’s leadership with MAJOR concession over Irish border | UK | News | Express.co.uk