When can children get the COVID-19 vaccine? 5 questions parents are asking


This article looks at the vaccines for children and it appears that work has already been started or is soon to start, but there is still, at least, one other area and this is for adults with learning disabilities (Intellectual Disabilities) and Autism who are needle averse, for in this area needle injections are not possible.

The adults are very vulnerable, but as I see it there is no work taking place in that direction.

With regards to Flu these adults can be given the nasal spray, which is generally given to children under 12 years, but it is not as effective as the injection, but something is better than nothing.

 

Source: When can children get the COVID-19 vaccine? 5 questions parents are asking

I’m a lung doctor testing the blood from COVID-19 survivors as a treatment for the sick – a century old idea that could be a fast track to treatment : The Conversation


In the blood of COVID-19 survivors are antibodies that can defeat SARS-CoV-2. Researchers are testing whether these antibodies can be collected and injected into others to save them from the virus.

Source: I’m a lung doctor testing the blood from COVID-19 survivors as a treatment for the sick – a century old idea that could be a fast track to treatment : The Conversation

How ‘good’ does a COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine need to be to stop the pandemic? A new study has answers


A vaccine that’s 70% effective might not be good enough if too few people are willing to be vaccinated, new research shows.

Source: How ‘good’ does a COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine need to be to stop the pandemic? A new study has answers

Rare neurological disorder, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, linked to COVID-19 : The Conversation


As if the symptoms of COVID-19 were not disturbing enough, physicians have noted a rare neurological condition that emerges during some severe cases of this viral infection.

Source: Rare neurological disorder, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, linked to COVID-19 : The Conversation

Workplaces are turning to devices to monitor social distancing, but does the tech respect privacy? : The Conversation


Smartphone apps and wearable devices can tell when workers have been within six feet of each other, promising to help curb the coronavirus. But they’re not all the same when it comes to privacy.

Source: Workplaces are turning to devices to monitor social distancing, but does the tech respect privacy? : The Conversation

Social care reform could be further delayed due to coronavirus : Care Home Professional


Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock has said social care reform could be further delayed because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Source: Social care reform could be further delayed due to coronavirus : Care Home Professional

Tories say £60k payment to bereaved families of health workers will NOT apply to care workers or cleaners – and families of immigrants may be deported – SKWAWKBOX


The UK government has said that the £60,000 bereavement payment to the families of health workers killed by the coronavirus will not apply to care workers or hospital cleaners.

The Tories have also said that families of the deceased have no automatic right to remain in the UK. Families of people who died trying to keeping us safe and well could face deportation if their right to remain is withdrawn.

Johnson and his fellow Tories will no doubt still make sure they are filmed ‘clapping for carers’ tomorrow.

Source: Tories say £60k payment to bereaved families of health workers will NOT apply to care workers or cleaners – and families of immigrants may be deported – SKWAWKBOX

Archaeology shows how ancient African societies managed pandemics : The Conversation


Archaeologists have long studied diseases in past populations. They’ve explored the evolution of pathogens and how they interacted with humans.

Source: Archaeology shows how ancient African societies managed pandemics : The Conversation

The mysterious disappearance of the first SARS virus, and why we need a vaccine for the current one but didn’t for the other : The Conversation


COVID-19 and SARS are both deadly – but different. SARS symptoms were quick to appear, making it easier to contain. Because health officials were able to contain it, the virus died off.

Source: The mysterious disappearance of the first SARS virus, and why we need a vaccine for the current one but didn’t for the other : The Conversation

It’s a bad idea for journalists to censor Trump – instead, they can help the public identify what’s true or false : The Conversation


Journalism’s ethics code says the press must ‘seek truth and report it,’ and also minimize harm. During a public health crisis, how should the press deal with President Trump’s inaccuracies and lies?

Source: It’s a bad idea for journalists to censor Trump – instead, they can help the public identify what’s true or false  : The Conversation