Don’t Let Memories Die


Memories are our own history and is important to ourselves and our family to record as much as we can.

I do wish I had done this, especially with regards to my own parents, for they are no longer with us and these memories are now lost for ever.

Author -Carole Parkes

As an avid family historian, I’m a great believer in memoirs and autobiographies. If your aged family members are capable, encourage them to give you a written piece on  their life experiences. If that would be too difficult, encourage them to talk about their lives — the times they laughed until their sides ached, or when sadness overtook them, in fact, to tell you about everything, including what they remember about great uncle Fred.

I know, it’s not always easy in our busy lives to find time to sit and talk but, just remember, those frail relatives will probably not be around when you finally do have the time to spend with them. I’ve lost count of the times I’ve heard those researching their family trees say they wished they’d asked the questions. Please don’t be one of them. We often only develop an interest in our roots as we…

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How to Help a Child Focus in the Classroom: Tips & Tricks


Children with ADHD experience a lower level of brain arousal, which means they are easily distracted by internal and external stimuli. Use these school and home strategies to improve focus and comp…

Source: How to Help a Child Focus in the Classroom: Tips & Tricks

Blame fat kids for NHS crisis says ex-surgeon & shadow health secretary : RT Question More.


Lord McColl is obsessed with just one aspect, when there are many aspects to consider.

Health and Social Care go in tandem as you can not fund one without the other or even worse under fund both.

Health and Social Care need to work closer together and it does have to be a consideration should not one organisation manage both Social Care and Health, for to not to do so is bound to have some duplication of work, which is not cost effective, especially having two management structures.

However, in many cases, family life is seriously fragmented for in 1948 it was generally that the male was the person who went to work, while the female looked after the family. This is not so today for in many families both parents are working so that they can, in some respects are able to function as a family unit by having the monetary means to fund a reasonable life.

As both parents are now working, this creates problems in creating meals and there many families create meals by using convenience foods or take always, which in some respects is not cost effective, for within the cost is an element of preparation by another party.

Family units are now more diverse and to find work many units have splintered across the UK and beyond.

You then have the power of the media, especially advertisements, which are geared to influence children and parents alike, by promoting foods which are considered less healthy, but are very tasty and appealing.

Also are Social Care and Health sufficient to manage the ever increasing population, the living longer factor and the increase in persons with disabilities, both physical and learning, due to improvements in medical science.

The may be other factors, but to chose just one shows complete ignorance of the problems and thereby the solutions.

BRITAIN: There is a saying teach our children well ‘ This should begin with parents ‘ be carried on by Teachers and End with believing everyone is equal Black and White or even Multicoloured instead people like sheeple follow those with their own grudges or political agendas and causing Racial Abuse to rise starting with our primary school children – @AceNewsServices


While schools are regarded as the main educators of children, they are not the only educators. For before children go to school they are usually at home and are being educated by their parents, whether this is intentional or not, as children observe what is around them and what is occurring.

So all parents have a duty to their children in the way they conduct themselves when in front of their children, for what children hear and see they will copy. However, there may be other factors, for they may go to a nursery and pre-school and also the community environment in which they live.

All of these are factors in how children behave, however, in many instances their behaviour could be tempered by how they are disciplined by family members.

So all in all, while teachers have their part to play, so do parents and all factors need to be taken into consideration.

Dyslexia & Effort | Why I Don’t Say “Try Harder” to My Dyslexic Child


Dyslexia isn’t a problem of effort. That’s what this dad found out in his journey to help his dyslexic daughter learn to read. Read his story.

Source: Dyslexia & Effort | Why I Don’t Say “Try Harder” to My Dyslexic Child

Children at risk of sexual exploitation if they don’t join an after-school club, warns school head.


It would appear that scaremongering is the current trend and that is in deed extremely worrying for who knows to where it will lead.

Schools should be a place of education and they should work with parents not against them for hopefully they all wish what is best for the children and this can only be done in tandem.

No one person knows everything and a piece of paper after a number of years at university does not make an expert in all fields. Parents are the experts when it comes to thier own childrens and this should be respected by all, by all working together in a combind team will lead to more beneficial outcomes.

Sally Donovan: adoption services should work with, not against, parents to learn from ‘near misses’


By working openly with adoptive parents, social workers can better learn from placement problems

Source: Sally Donovan: adoption services should work with, not against, parents to learn from ‘near misses’

Come on supermarkets – please stock nappies for disabled kids


Come on you supermarkets, who will be the first to corner the market.

Scope's Blog

Laura is a mum on a mission. She’s noticed a big gap in the market, and is campaigning for supermarkets to start stocking nappies in larger sizes. Here she tells her story. 

“Nothing worth having comes easy.”

Laura and her son Brody smiling on a rollercoaster rideMy life (well, house) is full of quotes. So much so, my best friend jokes with me about it. Still, on the days I feel like I’m fighting a lost cause, this one drives me.

Around a month ago, I started a change.org petition asking leading UK supermarkets to consider manufacturing or selling larger sized nappies, for incontinent children with additional support needs.

There are thousands of children in the UK, older than “typical” children, who are not potty trained. Naturally, as a result they require bigger nappies. Are they easy to find? Of course not!

My son Brody

A close-up photo of Brody amilingBrody has Global Development Delay, epilepsy, hypotonia and hypermobility. In our special world, he…

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Parents who record child protection meetings: what do social workers need to know?


A group of lawyers has produced guidance after identifying a number of councils not fully understanding the law around recording child protection meetings

Source: Parents who record child protection meetings: what do social workers need to know?