Second NHS trust prosecuted for safe care failings | News | Health Service Journal


A second NHS trust is being prosecuted by the Care Quality Commission over the death of a patient under fundamental standards brought in after the Mid Staffordshire care scandal.

Sussex Partnership Foundation Trust will appear in court on Wednesday charged with failing to provide safer care and treatment to a patient.

The case – which will be heard at Brighton magistrates court – involves a 19-year-old prisoner who was found hanging in the healthcare unit at HMP Lewes in February 2016.

The charges follow the accusation by the CQC that the trust breached regulation 12(1) of the fundamental standards, in that it failed to provide safe care and treatment which resulted in avoidable harm, or a significant risk of exposure to avoidable harm, to a service user.

As a first appearance, the case is expected to be adjourned to a later date.

CQC chief executive Ian Trenholm warned last year that the regulator was considering bringing more criminal prosecutions against providers.

So far, the CQC has only used its power to prosecute for failing to provide safe care against one other NHS trust. Southern Health Foundation Trust was fined £125,000 and told to pay £36,000 in costs after a patient under its care fell from a roof.

 

Source: Second NHS trust prosecuted for safe care failings | News | Health Service Journal

NHSI accused of ‘cover up’ over maternity deaths investigation | News | Health Service Journal


NHS Improvement, two royal colleges and the Care Quality Commission have been accused by a mother who lost her baby of trying to cover-up the findings of an independent investigation into a trust’s maternity services.

In an unprecedented move, NHSI has set up a so-called “independent review panel” to review the interim findings of the independent investigation of Shrewsbury and Telford Hospitals Trust, which was ordered by former health secretary Jeremy Hunt in 2017.

The panel also includes Gill Walton, chief executive of the Royal College of Midwives, and Lesley Regan, president of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. CQC deputy chief inspector Nigel Acheson is the final member of the panel.

The panel also includes Gill Walton, chief executive of the Royal College of Midwives, and Lesley Regan, president of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. CQC deputy chief inspector Nigel Acheson is the final member of the panel.

 

Source: NHSI accused of ‘cover up’ over maternity deaths investigation | News | Health Service Journal

Secret government plan to replace pharmacists with less-qualified technicians : Express.


Cuts and more cuts, where will it end for there will come a time when there is nothing left to cut.

All that is being achieved is to increase the death rate, thereby cutting the population.

Death is the new vision.

BMA – Workload strain compromises patient safety, finds survey


Unmanageable workload means GPs are struggling to provide safe care to patients, according to the results of a BMA survey.Findings from the recent survey of GPs in England highlight the alarming impact spiralling levels of demand are having on GPs, many of whom are increasingly unable to cope.Based on more than 5,000 responses, the survey found that 84 per cent of GPs report that unchecked and growing workload pressures are undermining their ability to provide safe and quality care.Of this figure, 57 per cent described their daily workloads as ‘unmanageable’ with a further 27 per cent saying that excessive pressures are directly impacting standards. Struggling GPsBMA GPs committee chair Chaand Nagpaul said the results emphasised how, despite the Government’s pledges of investment and support for general practice, much still needs to be done to address the monumental challenges facing the sector.He said: ‘This major survey of more than 5,000 GPs in England demonstrates that GP practices across the country are struggling to provide safe, high-quality patient care because of unmanageable workload.‘Many practices are being overwhelmed by rising patient demand, contracting budgets and staff shortages which has left them unable to deliver enough appointments and the specialist care many members of the public need.He added: ‘Addressing the crisis in general practice requires a clear strategy that addresses the numerous problems undermining local GP services.‘The recent GP Forward View accepted the principles behind the BMA’s Urgent Prescription for General Practice which laid out practical solutions, like those in our current survey, that the government needs to implement urgently.’We cannot continue to have a service that cannot deliver a safe and effective level of care to the public.’

Source: BMA – Workload strain compromises patient safety, finds survey

Progress overview: 2 years since Francis


An extract

‘Here is an overview of action taken by the Government in response to the failures at Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust.  ……….’

Original post from Compassionate Care Blog

This is a start which needs to be actively encouraged and not be allowed to fail.

Only time will tell if this is sufficient.

New laws for more open and safe care in the NHS


New laws for more open and safe care from Department of Health

An extract ‘Two new important laws to help improve patient safety, transparency, and leadership in the NHS come into force today.

The first is the statutory Duty of Candour, which places a legal duty on hospital, community and mental health trusts to inform and apologise to patients if there has been a mistake in their care which has led to significant harm.  ……’

‘……..The second new law relates to ensuring strong and safe leadership in healthcare organisations. Under the new regulations, all NHS board members will be required to undergo a Fit and Proper Person’s Test before they are appointed.  ……’

For more information follow Fit and proper persons requirement and the duty of candour for NHS bodies*

It would appear that this is welcome news, which may be long over due, but will it make a difference. Only time will tell, for, no matter how much legislation is created, if the organisations do not abide by it, then will there be any difference. Will the monitoring by CQC (Care Quality Commission) be sufficient? Are the new laws robust enough? For as stated in the Duty of Candour ‘.. a mistake in their care which has led to significant harm.’ why not all mistakes, whether there is harm or not?

We do need to trust the NHS, which currently we may do or not. But if we did not have the NHS we would all be far worse for it not being there.

 

Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v2.0.