Why freedom of movement is causing divisions – across Europe | Ines Wagner | Opinion | The Guardian


Freedom of movement for EU workers has been front and centre in the Brexit debate. Fear of foreign workers undercutting the wages and working conditions of locals helped to fuel the leave campaign. Now EU nationals – Poles and others – who have called Britain home for years, sometimes decades, face an uncertain future in the UK.

But while attitudes to migrant workers in Brexit Britain are often seen as a case apart, free movement of people evokes hostility in other EU countries too. The belief that foreigners take away jobs from local workers is – and has long been – a textbook example of false information. Research has proved again and again that the belief is ill-founded. Yet to some, it feels true no matter how many studies show that it is not.

 

Source: Why freedom of movement is causing divisions – across Europe | Ines Wagner | Opinion | The Guardian

I’m going to have to leave my job as an NHS nurse – I just can’t take it anymore


Many employment areas of the UK are underfunded for pay, while a few areas are not underfunded and are overpaid, perhaps MPs could be included in this, but the ‘Captains of industry’ more so.

It is said you have to pay the rate for the job to obtain the right calibre of people, which is mainly quoted re ‘Captains of Industry’, is that correct, do Captains of Industry even respect their high pay.

Whether they do or not is important, but not as important as the phrase ‘you have to pay the rate for the job to obtain the right calibre of people’ for is this not true in many, if not all professions and that is certainly so with nursing.

So lets not use a phrase just for the top 1%, but for all in employment, especially nursing.

If the country can not afford it, then it can not for ‘Captains of Industry’.

Lets bring equality into employment.

It’s not wage rises that are a problem for the economy – it’s the lack of them | Thomas Frank | Opinion | The Guardian


In recent weeks media outlets in the US have been fretting over what would ordinarily be considered good news – the roaring American economy, which has brought low unemployment and, in some places, a labour shortage. Owners and managers have complained about their problems in finding people to fill low-wage positions. “Nobody wants to do manual labour any more,” as one trade association grandee told the Baltimore Sun, and so the manual labour simply goes undone.

Company bosses talk about the things they have done to fix the situation: the ads they’ve published; the guest-worker visas for which they’ve applied; how they are going into schools to encourage kids to learn construction skills or to drive trucks. The Wall Street Journal reports on the amazing perks that plumbing companies are now offering new hires: quiet rooms, jetski trips, pottery classes, free breakfast, free beer.

But nothing seems to work. Blame for the labour shortage is sprayed all over the US map: opioids are said to be the problem. And welfare, and inadequate parking spaces, and a falling birthrate, and mass incarceration, and – above all – the Trump administration’s immigration policies. But no one really knows for sure.

 

Source: It’s not wage rises that are a problem for the economy – it’s the lack of them | Thomas Frank | Opinion | The Guardian