MP’s inquiry call into DWP pension ‘error’ Flintshire woman suicide


Yes, mistakes do occur, but not with such regularity. It would appear that the DWP are making a quest to make mistakes.

Then we hear the immortal phrase ‘Lessons will be learnt’, but will they. This is a phrase we have all heard for at least the last 50 years in many Central and Local Government departments and have any lessons been learnt, I doubt it.

For lessons to be learned there has to be willingness to learn and this Government has no willingness, just the opposite.

The decimation of the welfare state


A truly worrying situation and one that could be happening within the UK. The DWP situation with Benefit claims and while the appeal process is reversing many of the wrongful dismissed cases, will this always be so. Not if we implement the American system as we appear to be doing.

It is very worrying and this should be noticed by the DWP, but will it be, I fear not.

Basic Income: An Alternative to Universal Credit?


The concept sounds good but the practicalities are not for there will always people who do not need a basic income, the rich and there will always be those who would need more, people with disabilities, The later requiring more in relation to their disability.

If you make the Basic Income sufficient for many to live on what is the incentive to work.

Where would sufficient taxes and NI be raised to fund Central and Local Government spending and to fund the NHS and pensions.

Then when do people qualify is it when they are born, but then what about those that emigrate and also those that immigrate.

Would we be an open window for mass immigration.

It all needs to be well thought through and we have all seen the limitations of this principle.

Ipswich Unemployed Action.

Are a few Basic Income Pilot Schemes an Alternative to Universal Credit? 

Could a basic income replace Universal Credit? 

The BBC reports today.

A survey has found support for local experiments to explore paying people a basic income as an alternative to Universal Credit.

The Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) found 40% of people questioned backed local tests to see how such payments would work.

Only 15% would oppose the idea, a Populus survey of 2,070 people found.

However, the Department for Work and Pensions questioned the idea.

It said a basic income “would not work for those who need more support”.

The RSA describes a basic income as “a regular, unconditional payment made to every adult and child. It is not dependent on other earned or unearned income, is not means-tested and is not withdrawn as earnings rise”.

The article gives some…

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Twisted Damian Green thinks it’s ‘exciting’ that future jobs may not have stable hours, holiday pay, sick pay or pensions | Vox Political


The Secretary of State for Work and Pensions thinks it is “exciting” that his government is getting rid of the securities that have made working life bearable for working people for dec…

Source: Twisted Damian Green thinks it’s ‘exciting’ that future jobs may not have stable hours, holiday pay, sick pay or pensions | Vox Political

Private Eye on How the Tories Wrecked Private Pensions


The private sector workers have been losing their pension arrangements, but the public sector workers have not, but for how much longer. If they do will this also effect MPs and Ministers?

Beastrabban\'s Weblog

I found this piece in Private Eye for 8th to 22nd July 2011 on how Tory legislation allowing companies to take ‘pension holidays’ wrecked their pension schemes.

“There has been widespread pension reform across the economy. People in the private sector have seen old defined benefit schemes disappearing.” So said Cabinet Office minister Francis Maude in his defence of serious public sector pensions cuts when a graph in pension advisor John Hutton’s r4eport proved that the “unaffordable” argument didn’t hold water.

But why have private sector workers lost decent pension arrangements providing fixed benefits based on their previous salary? It’s not simply because too many oldies are not living longer.

Unlike most state schemes of this sort, private ones have to be backed by funds, which were in pretty good shape until the companies providing them started taking extended pension holidays in the 1980s and 1990s to bolster profits in…

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Tory MP David Willetts’ Defence of the Welfare State


Beastrabban\'s Weblog

The Tory MP, David Willetts, a member of the ‘One Nation’ group within the party, which had been set up to reconcile the Conservatives with the NHS, wrote a defence of the welfare state in his 1992 book, Modern Conservatism. This is surprising, not only because Willetts was a Tory, but also because he was Thatcher’s former adviser on social security. He wrote

Nobody is very clear why a Conservative should support a welfare state. It seems to fit in with the highmindedness of the Liberals and the egalitarianism of the Labour party. But what is conservative about it? If Conservatives do support it, is this mere political expediency? …

Why have a welfare state: efficiency and community
The are two types of argument for a welfare state. Neither is exclusively conservative, but they both tie in closely with two crucial elements of conservative philosophy – the belief in…

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