A straight-faced Kellyanne Conway says anyone in office who committed sexual assault should resign : ThinkProgress


Irony is dead.

By ALAN PYKE

Kellyanne Conway, center, with husband George Conway, right, greet guests on the South Lawn of the White House during a Halloween event. CREDIT: AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

KELLYANNE CONWAY, CENTER, WITH HUSBAND GEORGE CONWAY, RIGHT, GREET GUESTS ON THE SOUTH LAWN OF THE WHITE HOUSE DURING A HALLOWEEN EVENT. CREDIT: AP PHOTO/PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway refused repeatedly to say whether Alabama Republican Roy Moore should step aside in his Senate race over allegations he is a serial child molester.

Conway, who played an essential role in protecting President Donald Trump’s candidacy a year ago when tapes of him describing his pattern of sexual assault nearly sunk his campaign, told ABC’s Martha Raddatz that the allegations are disqualifying if they are true but would not give a clear answer on her view of the charges.

In the process of demurring on Moore’s guilt or innocence, Conway said elected officials who are guilty of sexual assault or harassment should resign — a call to action that would seem to implicate Conway’s boss, who openly bragged about grabbing women and has been accused of sexual assault by numerous former associates.

“I want to be very clear, I want to be explicit here, I denounce that conduct, and if the allegations are true he ought to step aside,” Conway told ABC’s Martha Raddatz during a tense, long exchange about the report that Republican senate candidate Roy Moore (AL) habitually sought the romantic and sexual company of children during his 30s.

“And if the allegations are true about a lot of people, they oughta step aside,” Conway continued. “And some of them are probably holding office right now.”

Conway said the press should pay more attention to Sen. Bob Menendez’s (D-NJ) ongoing corruption trial. She also invoked former President Bill Clinton (D), who was repeatedly accused of sexual assault and predatory behavior toward women staffers and associates during his political career. The details of the allegations against Clinton from women like Juanita Broaddrick and Paula Jones are getting renewed scrutiny thanks to their parallels to the tactics of confessed serial abusers like Harvey Weinstein, as numerous pundits have noted in recent weeks.

But where Clinton’s alleged history of predation goes, so follows Trump’s. Both men have been accused of sexual assault by multiple women over a course of decades.

“I don’t know the accusers and I don’t know Judge [Roy] Moore. But I also want to make sure that we as a nation are not prosecuting people through the press,” Conway told Raddatz Sunday morning.

With Raddatz repeatedly pressing Conway for a straight answer on whether or not she personally believes the allegations leveled against Moore in reporting that pulls from 30 different source interviews in his state, Trump’s senior communicator demurred.

“I don’t know Leigh Corfman,” Conway said, referring to one of four women who told the Washington Post that Moore touched them while he was in his 30s and they were teenagers. “I believe that both sides are alleging different things here,” she said, before reiterating her call for anyone who’s raped a woman or child to step down from office.

“If there’s anyone currently in public office who’s behaved that way to any girl or any woman, maybe they should step aside. Because in a country of 330 million people we oughta be able to do any of this,” Conway said.

She went on to invoke her own history of speaking out about sexual assault and harassment by powerful men in politics, all without ever acknowledging that she continues to work for a man who bragged on tape about “grab[bing women] by the pussy” because “when you’re a celebrity they let you do it.”

“I tried to raise this issue a year ago, on October 9th, I said explicitly that I had been a victim of people in power,” Conway told Raddatz. “And nobody took me seriously. You know why? Because of who I work for, of whose campaign I was managing.”

The October 9, 2016, comments Conway was referring to followed the bombshell publication of videos showing Trump bragging about groping women he found attractive and getting away with it. Conway insisted her boss was a “gentleman” and praised him for apologizing after he dismissed his comments as “locker-room talk” in a televised debate.

Steve Bannon, then campaign manager for Trump, later told reporters that Conway deserved all the credit for Trump’s candidacy surviving the release of the tapes, which seemed to corroborate in his own words a pattern of assaultive behavior alleged against him by more than a dozen individual women over the years.

“If Kellyanne had not been there when the firestorm hit, I don’t know if we would have made it,” Bannon told the Atlantic in the spring. “She literally became a cult figure during that time period, just because of her relentless advocacy for Trump on TV.”

For her pains, Trump rewarded her by being himself. Four days after Conway’s public defense of her boss as a “gentleman,” Trump mocked the women who have accused him of sexual assault by saying they were too unattractive for him to have bothered with.

Believe me, she would not be my first choice,” Trump said of one of his many accusers on October 13, 2016.

Conway has now worked in service of Trump’s message and career for 17 months and counting.

 

Source : A straight-faced Kellyanne Conway says anyone in office who committed sexual assault should resign : ThinkProgress

I told a lie to claim benefits. Now I am an MP and I want to tell you why : Guardian.


Good on you Metiria Turei and no people should not falsely claim benefit but many do to survive and all cases some be looked at on their merit.

Fraud for greed should be pounced on, but fraud to live should be different. These people need help and the Society in which they live is not producing that help. It may be that they need help to run their life better so that fraud is not the manner to exist.

Punish the true fraudsters not those just wishing to live.

Society does look down on fraudsters and in many cases rightly so., but many in that Society are also fraudsters. How many try to avoid paying tax or should I say minimize our tax payments, for there are some legal ways to do so, such as ISAs.

But some of the biggest fraudsters are those who appear to have plenty to live on. Some have been MPs in the UK by fiddling expenses, some are Corporations who use many ways to minimize their tax liability many of them being legal, but for a few some that are not.

But why does it appear the person in the street is more likely to be charged than the Corporations, is it because they are easier targets, while Corporations can afford to bring in legal experts to argue when they are suspected of fraud.

Surely all should be equal in the eyes of the law and all should be prosecuted if fraud is suspected and the punishment fit the crime taking into account the circumstances.

The reality of needing to claim benefits also needs to looked at, as for some the need to claim benefits is a necessity not a luxury, as even with benefits they will never be anyway near a luxury status.

All in Government and also the press need to reflect on this and then and only then will the stigma of claiming benefits be lifted and also will the public view of persons on benefits.

The majority on benefits do need these benefits and the fraudsters and certainly so called scroungers are the very few, especially the latter. But are real people who need benefits newsworthy, unless there is a dramatic story more than likely leading to loss of life. The occasional benefit scrounger story is so more apparently newsworthy, so what does this say about ourselves and our so called Society.

SUBSTRATUMS

A homeless person in the centre of Auckland.
A homeless person in the centre of Auckland. Photograph: Phil Walter/Getty Images

Last weekend I revealed a lie, a lie that I decided to talk about because of the situation we as a society find ourselves in.

I am the co-leader of the Green party of Aotearoa New Zealand – the third biggest political party in our small democracy. We are two months from our general election, and we’re in a tight tussle to change the government.

Over the weekend, at our party’s AGM, we launched an incomes policy which would create the most significant changes to New Zealand’s welfare system in a generation. It’s a comprehensive piece of work that…

View original post 596 more words

PIP Turned Down- Because Claimant Carried A Handbag


When my daughter does go out she insists in taking one of her handbags, but not because she requires the items in it. She takes her handbag because she sees other ladies carrying hand bags. She is mimicking how she preceives others and now it is part of her routine, but it plays no part in assessing her independence.

Any assessor who believes a handbag is a relevant action to a persons independence is a fool and incompetent and should not be allowed to undertake assessments.

Same Difference

When we shared this post on Facebook,  we received this comment:

The mind boggles. One of the reasons I got turned down was that I carried a handbag And can read a newspaper. Anyone going for assessment don’t carry a bag and if you can walk go extremely slowly and make the assessor wait and whatever you do. Do not move the chair in the room. Sit on it wherever it is placed and if need moving ask the assessor to do it. These were some of the points they made for refusing.

We’re scared, readers, very scared.

View original post

Outrage Over ‘Teen Vogue’ Pics Reveals Racial Identity More Complex Than It Seems


Original post from Take Part

‘…………..Staff Writer Liz Dwyer has written about race, parenting, and social justice for several national publications. She was previously education editor at Good.

Images accompanying an article about Senegalese twists ignited a firestorm over the seeming lack of inclusion of black women.

(Photo: Instagram)
(Photo: Instagram)

It’s a hairstyle that originated in West Africa and has long been popular in the black community in the United States. Now, thanks to a Teen Vogue article celebrating the coiled braids, “Senegalese twists” have gone high fashion. But some readers of the magazine are taking to social media to express their hurt and anger over those being left out of the pictures: dark-skinned black women.

The firestorm started late Sunday evening when Twitter user Jojothajawn began tweeting her displeasure over the pics accompanying an article in the mag.

“Seriously not buying @TeenVogue again. I’m so insulted by this! You interview a White girl about African hairstyles!!” Jojothajawn wrote in one of her tweets. “It’s bad enough that your cheap ass mag barely has any BW [black women] but the ONE time you should, you don’t deliver,” she wrote in another.

The tweets were shared on Twitter and Tumblr thousands of times. Jojothajawn and otherTeen Vogue readers also criticized the inclusion of images of only lighter-skinned black or mixed-race actors, such as Zendaya and Zoë Kravitz, as examples of celebs who rock ethnic hairstyles.

“With these waist-length Zoë Kravitz–inspired twists, life felt infinitely easier, my morning routine swifter, and I could go from swimming to a dinner party without so much as a blow-dry,” wrote the article’s author, Teen Vogue beauty and health editor Elaine Welteroth. In the article, Welteroth details a trip she took to Rwanda and the experience she had getting her hair braided.

<blockquote class=”twitter-tweet” lang=”en”><p lang=”en” dir=”ltr”>Seriously not buying <a href=”https://twitter.com/TeenVogue”>@TeenVogue</a&gt; again. I’m so insulted by this! You interview a White girl about African hairstyles!! <a href=”http://t.co/YxIDuQfP1V”>pic.twitter.com/YxIDuQfP1V</a></p>&mdash; jo | lee | sa (@JOJOTHAJAWN) <a href=”https://twitter.com/JOJOTHAJAWN/status/612829424212418564″>June 22, 2015</a></blockquote>
<script async src=”//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js” charset=”utf-8″></script>

“What about Solange? Janelle Monae?? Non celebrity POC??!!” tweeted Jojothajawn.

Jojothajawn seems to be referring to how pop culture and fashion borrow heavily from black and African culture—from Bo Derek’s cornrows to the big-booty stardom of Iggy Azalea, Kim Kardashian, and Jennifer Lopez—but rarely put darker-skinned black women in the spotlight.

With her tweets, Jojothajawn reminds us of the lack of diversity in the fashion industry. Last year, published by 44 major fashion mags found that only 19 percent featured nonwhite models. The problem extends to the runway, which is among the reasons Bethann Hardison, a veteran black model and agent, founded the Diversity Coalition, an organization that seeks to catalyze racial diversity within the industry. “Eyes are on an industry that season after season watches design houses consistently use one or no models of color. No matter the intention, the result is racism,” Hardison .

So, Why Should You Care? With her tweets, Jojothajawn reminds us of the lack of diversity in the fashion industry. Last year, an analysis of 611 covers published by 44 major fashion mags found that only 19 percent featured nonwhite models. The problem extends to the runway, which is among the reasons Bethann Hardison, a veteran black model and agent, founded the Diversity Coalition, an organization that seeks to catalyze racial diversity within the industry. “Eyes are on an industry that season after season watches design houses consistently use one or no models of color. No matter the intention, the result is racism,” Hardison wrote in an open letter.

Just as studies have shown that it’s critical to the self-esteem of brown and black girls to have dolls that look like them, seeing themselves within the pages of a magazine matters too—particularly when the hairstyle is one that originates with black girls and women.

<blockquote class=”twitter-tweet” lang=”en”><p lang=”en” dir=”ltr”>It’s bad enough that your cheap ass mag barely has any BW but the ONE time you should, you don’t deliver. <a href=”https://twitter.com/TeenVogue”>@TeenVogue</a&gt; <a href=”http://t.co/0L50CdwCOb”>pic.twitter.com/0L50CdwCOb</a></p>&mdash; jo | lee | sa (@JOJOTHAJAWN) <a href=”https://twitter.com/JOJOTHAJAWN/status/612830560050937857″>June 22, 2015</a></blockquote>
<script async src=”//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js” charset=”utf-8″></script>

Welteroth addressed the controversy in the comments section of a post on Instagram—and it turns out everything isn’t as it seems with the images.

“It is told from my personal perspective as a mixed-race girl who travels to Rwanda to embrace an Afro-centric hairstyle. I describe feeling a sense of beauty, strength, and pride in connecting with my heritage in this way,” she wrote about the article. Welteroth, it turns out, is half black.

Although images of Welteroth weren’t used in the print version of the piece, she defended the decision to feature anecdotes about Zendaya, and how the former Disney star’s faux locks were criticized by Fashion Police‘s Giuliana Rancic on the red carpet at the Oscars in February.

“We are both mixed-race and it was important in telling this particular story—MY story—to cast a model who is also mixed-race. I welcome important dialogue about representation, but it is no longer productive when we refuse to look at the context.” Welteroth also challenged readers who might think “the model doesn’t look black enough,” and those who might think she isn’t black enough because she is biracial.

Model Phillipa Steele wrote on Models.com that she is “1/2 Fijian and the other half is made up of Tongan, French, English and American.” Fans of Steele are taking to Twitter to defend her ethnicity.

<blockquote class=”twitter-tweet” lang=”en”><p lang=”en” dir=”ltr”>She ain’t white. She’s Fijian. And we’re descended from Africans anyway. Thank u <a href=”https://twitter.com/TeenVogue”>@TeenVogue</a&gt; for featuring our Fijian beauty! <a href=”https://twitter.com/hashtag/PhillipaSteele?src=hash”>#PhillipaSteele</a></p>&mdash; Tam Digitaki Sharma (@TamDigitaki) <a href=”https://twitter.com/TamDigitaki/status/613242823337381888″>June 23, 2015</a></blockquote>
<script async src=”//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js” charset=”utf-8″></script>

Other people who hail from Fiji are also sharing that when it comes to blackness, looks can be deceiving.

<blockquote class=”twitter-tweet” lang=”en”><p lang=”en” dir=”ltr”>Damn straight! Oh look <a href=”https://twitter.com/JOJOTHAJAWN”>@JOJOTHAJAWN</a&gt; I’m a half white &amp; black Fijian with dreads…well will wonders never cease <a href=”http://t.co/9VXsFkSGHl”>pic.twitter.com/9VXsFkSGHl</a></p>&mdash; Mich Wilson (@FjBlackOrchid) <a href=”https://twitter.com/FjBlackOrchid/status/613207223230017536″>June 23, 2015</a></blockquote>
<script async src=”//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js” charset=”utf-8″></script>

As for Jojothajawn, on Monday afternoon she apologized on Twitter to anyone she may have offended. But she stills seems to be hurt by the colorism in the fashion industry and the overall exclusion of darker-skinned black women.

“Why can’t I look in a magazine and see models who look like me?” she asked.

RELATED: 

 Proof We’re Not Post-Racial: People Are Paying $10 Billion a Year to Be Lighter  …………’

People, like water, must be filtered.


This is so correct. You appear to be a person who follows a true path, what a shame all are not able or unwilling to to do so.

stevenjcurtis

the mat at the doorShould we let anyone into our house? Of course we shouldn’t. There is a reason why the front door locks. It is common fact that not everyone has our best interest in mind. People will try to use us if we allow them. It’s as though they have their goals and their agendas and nothing outside of them reaching it matters. Some others just bring drama with them. They are always complaining about something, They are never satisfied or happy, and they are more than willing to tell you about it. And lastly, there is a group of people who love to stir the pot. They instigate and cause problems. They will give the worst advice and look down at us for not taking it. People are like water. They must be filtered.

There are different types of people that we should use extreme caution with.

  • The first group I call “head…

View original post 339 more words

Why you should never assume anything about people with autism


Original post from The Conversation

‘……….. AUTHOR

Luke Beardon

Senior Lecturer in Autism at Sheffield Hallam University

Daryl Hannah has been open about her autism. World Travel and Tourism, CC BY

Decades ago I found myself working with a young woman with autism. I had done my reading of the autism texts of the time, and was singularly surprised when nothing I had read matched up to the person I was sat next to. There was no flapping, she had no interest in my earrings or buttons, and she certainly wasn’t even lining anything up.

We know so much more about autism now but the idea that all people with autism are disordered, impaired, or somehow “lesser” is one that still needs to be challenged. Having worked closely with people with autism for more than 20 years, I have had the pleasure of meeting many hugely intelligent, insightful, kind, caring, loyal, skilled autistic individuals, including two of my best doctoral students who both graduated successfully and are now prominent in their respective fields.

Some of the strongest marriages I have encountered are between people with autism, and I have also met multi-millionaire entrepreneurs who have been identified as autistic.

Identifying not diagnosing

So, the question remains, why is it that autism continues to be seen as a disorder, with terms such as “impaired functioning” still so rife within the literature and current diagnostic manuals? Why is it that one needs to present as a “problem” before being in a position to be identified as autistic? Even the term “diagnosis” brings along its own associations with “illness” or “disease”. Surely, this gives out the wrong message to all involved – parents, individuals, and the public.

For years I have been suggesting “identification” as a more appropriate term, which counters the pejorative language so often heard in reference to autism.

Without doubt being autistic in a world populated in the main by people who are not can cause huge issues for the individual and their family. But this is not the same as suggesting that the problems are caused by being autistic. The very fact that there are plenty of autistic individuals who are hugely successful demonstrates that being autistic does not preclude anything at all. Actors Dan Ackroyd and Daryl Hannah, and singer Courtney Love are to name but a few, while others have retrospectively identified other potential big names such as Stanley Kubrick.

Measuring outcomes

Some research has shown poor outcomes for people with autism but there have been fewer evaluations using real-world measures such as employability, self-sufficiency and social support. Some of the ways we measure ability may also be problematic – take memory and learning, for example. The task support hypothesis – the idea that situations can be created for individuals with autism that capitalise on their areas of strength – can lead to situations where the ability to remember is increased.

The sad fact is that there are still schools of thought that deny the fact that people with autism can lead very successful lives; comments such as “she will never be able to have children”, or “he will never go to university” are still way too prevalent. Parents of newly identified children are still sometimes told what the future will hold, despite the fact that no one has a crystal ball. Perhaps many of the problems stem from being in a poorly understood minority group, rather than directly from being autistic?

Learning, growing, developing. Shutterstock

Nonetheless, things are changing for the better – however slowly. The National Autistic Society, for example, promotes employment for people with autism. The Equality and Human Rights Commission is working to ensure a level playing field in the workplace, although there is some way to go before this is fully realised.

At the Autism Centre at Sheffield Hallam University we’ve been working to further these initial advances; to continue to promote a more accepting view of autism and to encourage society to recognise the potential of autistic individuals. One of the courses we run in collaboration with the National Autistic Society has welcomed a plethora of autistic speakers, guest lecturers and autistic students who share insight and expertise.

So, have perceptions changed over the years? Well, for absolute certainty I can say that mine have. I no longer assume that all publications are correct, and recognise that all autistic people are individuals. I have learnt to challenge the notion of impairment and disorder, while still recognising the huge challenges faced by individuals and families. I have begun to recognise the damage that can be done by ignorance and misinformation. And I have learnt that changing perceptions through a better understanding of autism can significantly improve lives, and the best way to develop an understanding of autism is to listen to those who are autistic, their families and friends.

In terms of general perception – well, society is certainly moving slowly in the right direction, with more and more autistic people self-advocating and promoting their strengths, but there is an awful long way to go.  …………….’

Why You Should Never Assume Anything About People With Autism


Original post from EPOCH TIMES

Daryl Hannah has been open about her autism. (World Travel and Tourism, CC BY ) Daryl Hannah has been open about her autism. (World Travel and Tourism, CC BY )

Daryl Hannah has been open about her autism. (World Travel and Tourism, CC BY )

Decades ago I found myself working with a young woman with autism. I had done my reading of the autism texts of the time, and was singularly surprised when nothing I had read matched up to the person I was sat next to. There was no flapping, she had no interest in my earrings or buttons, and she certainly wasn’t even lining anything up.

We know so much more about autism now but the idea that all people with autism are disordered, impaired, or somehow “lesser” is one that still needs to be challenged. Having worked closely with people with autism for more than 20 years, I have had the pleasure of meeting many hugely intelligent, insightful, kind, caring, loyal, skilled autistic individuals, including two of my best doctoral students who both graduated successfully and are now prominent in their respective fields.

Some of the strongest marriages I have encountered are between people with autism, and I have also met multi-millionaire entrepreneurs who have been identified as autistic.

Identifying Not Diagnosing

So, the question remains, why is it that autism continues to be seen as a disorder, with terms such as “impaired functioning” still so rife within the literature and current diagnostic manuals? Why is it that one needs to present as a “problem” before being in a position to be identified as autistic? Even the term “diagnosis” brings along its own associations with “illness” or “disease”. Surely, this gives out the wrong message to all involved – parents, individuals, and the public.

For years I have been suggesting “identification” as a more appropriate term, which counters the pejorative language so often heard in reference to autism.

Without doubt being autistic in a world populated in the main by people who are not can cause huge issues for the individual and their family. But this is not the same as suggesting that the problems are caused by being autistic. The very fact that there are plenty of autistic individuals who are hugely successful demonstrates that being autistic does not preclude anything at all. Actors Dan Ackroyd and Daryl Hannah, and singer Courtney Love are to name but a few, while others have retrospectively identified other potential big names such as Stanley Kubrick.

Measuring Outcomes

Some research has shown poor outcomes for people with autism but there have been fewer evaluations using real-world measures such as employability, self-sufficiency and social support. Some of the ways we measure ability may also be problematic – take memory and learning, for example. The task support hypothesis – the idea that situations can be created for individuals with autism that capitalise on their areas of strength – can lead to situations where the ability to remember is increased.

The sad fact is that there are still schools of thought that deny the fact that people with autism can lead very successful lives; comments such as “she will never be able to have children”, or “he will never go to university” are still way too prevalent. Parents of newly identified children are still sometimes told what the future will hold, despite the fact that no one has a crystal ball. Perhaps many of the problems stem from being in a poorly understood minority group, rather than directly from being autistic?

 (AP Photo/Scott Heppell, File)

(AP Photo/Scott Heppell, File)

Nonetheless, things are changing for the better – however slowly. The National Autistic Society, for example, promotes employment for people with autism. The Equality and Human Rights Commission is working to ensure a level playing field in the workplace, although there is some way to go before this is fully realised.

At the Autism Centre at Sheffield Hallam University we’ve been working to further these initial advances; to continue to promote a more accepting view of autism and to encourage society to recognise the potential of autistic individuals. One of the courses we run in collaboration with the National Autistic Society has welcomed a plethora of autistic speakers, guest lecturers and autistic students who share insight and expertise.

So, have perceptions changed over the years? Well, for absolute certainty I can say that mine have. I no longer assume that all publications are correct, and recognise that all autistic people are individuals. I have learnt to challenge the notion of impairment and disorder, while still recognising the huge challenges faced by individuals and families. I have begun to recognise the damage that can be done by ignorance and misinformation. And I have learnt that changing perceptions through a better understanding of autism can significantly improve lives, and the best way to develop an understanding of autism is to listen to those who are autistic, their families and friends.

In terms of general perception – well, society is certainly moving slowly in the right direction, with more and more autistic people self-advocating and promoting their strengths, but there is an awful long way to go.

 

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read theoriginal article.  ………’

How Our Thoughts Control Our DNA


Original post from Wake Up World

How Our Thoughts Control Our DNA

1st March 2015

By Bruce H. Lipton Ph.D

Guest Writer for Wake Up World

The common idea that DNA determines so much of who we are — not only our eye or hair color, for example, but also our addictions, disorders, or susceptibility to cancer — is a misconception. This concept “says you are less powerful than your genes.

The problem with that belief system is that it extends to another level …  You find yourself to be more or less a victim of your heredity. You become irresponsible. You say, “I can’t do anything about it, so why try?”

In reality, a person’s perception, not genetic programming, is what spurs all action in the body. It is actually our beliefs that select our genes, that select our behavior.

The human body is comprised of 50 to 65 trillion cells. Cell functions independent of DNA and its perceptions of environmental stimuli affect DNA. This also applies the same principles to the human body as a whole, showing the power our perceptions, our beliefs, have over DNA.

5-Step Explanation

1.The cell is like a human body and it functions without DNA

The cell is like a human body. It is capable of respiration, digestion, reproduction, and other life functions. The nucleus, which contains the genes, has traditionally been viewed as the control center — the brain of the cell.

Yet, when the nucleus is removed, the cell continues with all of its life functions and it can still recognize toxins and nutrients. It appears the nucleus — and the DNA it contains — does not control the cell.

Scientists assumed some 50 years ago that genes control biology. It just seemed so correct, we bought the story. We don’t have the right assumptions.

2. DNA is controlled by the environment

Proteins carry out the functions in cells and they are building blocks of life. It has long been thought that DNA controls or determines the actions of proteins.

Here I propose a different model. Environmental stimuli that come into contact with the cell membrane are perceived by receptor proteins in the membrane. This sets off a chain reaction of proteins passing on what could be described as messages to other proteins, motivating action in the cell.

DNA is coated in a protective sleeve of protein. The environmental signals act on that protein, causing it to open up and to select certain genes for use — genes specifically needed to react to the current environment.

Basically, DNA is not the beginning of the chain reaction. Instead, the cell membrane’s perception of the environment is the first step.

If there are no perceptions, the DNA is inactive.

Genes can’t turn themselves on or off … they can’t control themselves. If a cell is cut off from any environmental stimuli, it doesn’t do anything. Life is due to how the cell responds to the environment.

3. Perception of the environment is not necessarily the reality of the environment

In a 1988 study done by John Cairns, published in the journal Nature titled “The Origin of Mutants,” heshowed that mutations in DNA were not random, but happened in a predetermined way in response to environmental stresses.

In every one of your cells, you have genes whose function it is to rewrite and adapt genes as necessary. In a chart illustrating Cairns findings in the journal, environmental signals were shown to be separate from the organism’s perception of environmental signals.

A being’s perception of the environment acts as a filter between the reality of the environment and the biological reaction to it.

Perception rewrites genes!

4. Human beliefs, choosing to perceive a positive or negative environment

Just as a cell has receptor proteins to perceive the environment outside the cell membrane, humans have the five senses.

These are what help a person determine which genes need to be activated for a given situation.

The genes are like programs on a computer disk. These programs can be divided into two classes: the first relates to growth, or reproduction; the second relates to protection.

When a cell encounters nutrients, the growth genes are activated and used. When a cell encounters toxins, the protection genes are activated and used.

When a human being encounters love, the growth genes are activated. When a human being encounters fear, the protection genes are activated.

A person may perceive a negative environment where there is actually a supportive or positive environment. When this negative perception activates the protection genes, the body’s response is the programmed “fight or flight.”

5. ‘Fight or Flight’

Blood flow is directed away from the vital organs to the limbs, which are used for fighting and running. The immune system becomes of lesser importance. If you picture the responses we once needed for running from a lion, for example, the legs would have been infinitely more important in that immediate situation than the immune system. Thus, the body favors the legs and neglects the immune system.

So, when a person perceives a negative environment, the body tends to neglect the immune system and vital organs. Stress also makes us less intelligent, less clear-minded. The part of the brain related to reflexes is given more prominence in fight or flight mode than the part related to memory and other mental functions.

When a person perceives a loving environment, the body activates growth genes and nurtures the body.

For example, in Eastern European orphanages where children are given lots of nutrients, but little love these types of institutions have found to have stunted development in terms of height, learning, and other areas. There is also a high incidence of autism. Autism in this case is a symptom of protection genes being activated, like walls being put up.

Beliefs act as a filter between the real environment and your biology. Thus, people have the power to change their biology. It is important to keep a clear perception because otherwise you won’t develop the right things biologically for the real environment around you.

You are not victims of genes. What beliefs are you choosing for your genes to be expressed?

Please note: The above is a simplistic summary of “The Biology of Belief”. For more details, you may visit www.brucelipton.com

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About the author:

Bruce LiptonBruce H. Lipton, Ph.D is an internationally recognized leader in bridging science and spirit. Stem cell biologist, bestselling author of The Biology of Belief and recipient of the 2009 Goi Peace Award, he has been a guest speaker on hundreds of TV and radio shows, as well as keynote presenter for national and international conferences.

Dr. Lipton has taken his award-winning medical school lectures to the public and is currently a sought after keynote speaker and workshop presenter. He lectures to conventional and complementary medical professionals and lay audiences about leading-edge science and how it dovetails with mind-body medicine and spiritual principles. His books include:

  • 2005 The Biology of Belief – Unleashing the Power of Consciousness, Matter & Miracles
  • 2006 The Wisdom of Your Cells – How Your Beliefs Control Your Biology
  • 2009 Spontaneous Evolution: Our Positive Future and a Way to Get There from Here
  • 2013 The Honeymoon Effect: The Science of Creating Heaven on Earth

Dr. Lipton’s books are all available here.

To learn more, go to BruceLipton.comFacebook.com/BruceHLiptonPhDTwitter.com/BiologyOfBelief… and BruceLipton.com/VideosPodCasts.