Male Circumscision – is it Child Abuse?


I Agree and this should be outlawed in any civilisation.

Opher's World

We have no problem whatsoever in declaring that female circumcision is child abuse. If a parent allows their female child to be mutilated then most civilised people would shout loudly that it is wrong.

It does not matter if the parents erroneously believe that it is a religious practice.

Religious practices are not above the law.

Some religious practice declares that it is not only alright, but an absolute mandate from god, to take the life of a nonbeliever. It is never right.

Some religious belief declares that it is right for a wife to throw herself on the funeral pyre of her husband.

Female circumcision is an abuse. It is wrong. It is illegal. It never should happen.

Neither should male circumcision be allowed. It is nowhere near as bad as female mutilation but it is the same principle. A child should not be subjected to such a mutilation…

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Quotes – Bertrand Russell – One of my favourite people!


Opher's World

Bertie was a philosopher who spoke it like it was. What he said always made sense.

Fear is the main source of superstition, and one of the main sources of cruelty. To conquer fear is the beginning of wisdom.
That makes sense to me. Fear of death is the main reason people are religious – fear of hell – fear of god. Not for me. Our destruction of nature has a lot to do with our fear of creatures and natural events. We seek to tame it.
The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt.
How true is that? The stupid always think they know while the clever know enough to be sure that it is never black and white.
Most people would sooner die than think; in fact, they do so.
The sheeple rule. Maybe people should have to…

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How to change the world for the better! Easy steps!


Opher's World

The first step is to acknowledge that things are not so bad as they might be:

  • We are not dead
  • We are not starving
  • We are not at war
  • Hardly anyone has been killed by terrorism
  • We are quite comfortable
  • We are not cold
  • We are not in great danger
  • Our children and grandchildren are safe
  • If we need help we will be taken care of

In fact we are exceedingly lucky when compared to the conditions most of the world lives in!

The second step is to realise that most of the things we worry about do have solutions:

  • Islamic terrorism will be defeated
  • War in Syria/Libya/Iraq/Afghanistan will come to an end
  • The environment can be protected
  • Poaching of rhino and elephants can be stopped
  • Overpopulation can be dealt with
  • Global corporations can be controlled
  • Inequality and poverty can be addressed
  • Racism, sexism and xenophobia can be addressed
  • We…

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Do you need religion to give your life meaning?


Phil Ebersole's Blog

In LIFE AFTER FAITH: The Case for Secular Humanism (2014), Philip Kitcher argues that religion is not necessary to lead a happy, meaningful and ethical life.

PhilipKitcherLifeAfterFaith41M561fKDdL._SX303_BO1,204,203,200_His argument is obviously true, as far as it goes.  I know of many people, through personal aquaintence and reading who aren’t in the least religious, but are happy, wise and good.

But there also are saints and heroes whose religious faith enables them to go beyond what average human nature is capable of, as well as many seemingly ordinary people for whom faith is a source of quiet serenity and unpretentious goodness.

Others are hurt by their religion.  Their faith fails them in times of crisis.  Or they are tormented by a sense of sin because they can’t obey certain rules or accept certain beliefs.

Religion certainly makes life more dramatic.

If I believed, and internalized the belief, that my life was a…

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The Life of a Caregiver


Unless you are a caregiver you can not comprehend the resolve, the will, the energy and time and patience needed to provide quality care. You’re concentrating on the person requiring and wishing to be cared for and rarely consider yourself. When you do it is then that you may realise how your own health is deteriorating and who then cares for you.

Life is strange, isn’t it?

I have to wonder sometimes at its fairness – how some of us get to stay relatively healthy while we watch our loved-ones fall apart.

Some believe it’s all predestined: were those who are put into the role of caregiver always meant to be one? Were they somehow chosen? I’ve heard it said that people who have ended up caring for others may be challenged by a higher power… that they are, by divine intervention, simply the person for the job. Some are able to make their own choice to work in the service of those who are less fortunate, or who are sick, some have no choice other than the choice to run away.

I’m a great believer that everything happens for a reason, though not necessarily in a mystical sense. Good and bad must always have a balance. The weights tip back and…

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