A short history of black women and police violence : The Conversation


Young men make up the majority of black people killed by police in the US. That’s fed a perception that black women are somehow shielded from the threat of police violence. They aren’t.

Source: A short history of black women and police violence : The Conversation

10 Years Later, She Confronted The Cop Who Said Her Rape Was ‘Consensual’ | HuffPost UK


University of Arizona Lieutenant David Caballero will never forget the day he opened his computer to find an email from former student Jillian Corsie sitting in his inbox.

“It was October 28, 2015,” Caballero told HuffPost last week. “I’ll never forget that date.”

The veteran cop had just sat down at his desk and begun deleting the junk folder in his inbox when he came across something that caught his eye. It was an email from a woman he had crossed paths with more than a decade ago. Although he didn’t remember her, she remembered him.

“I’ve carried your card around in my wallet since the night we met,” Corsie wrote. “Ten years ago this month you interviewed me about a rape I experienced on campus. After an embarrassing and horrible interview for me, the [University of Arizona Police Department] deemed my experience ‘consensual.’”

Corsie told HuffPost that she was raped in 2005 by a male classmate in her dorm room during the first month of college. When she turned to her friends for help, most of them were wildly unsupportive. Her boyfriend didn’t believe her and thought she had simply cheated on him. Corsie later went to local police for help, but they told her “not to mix alcohol and beauty,” she said. The two patrol supervisors on duty that day, Caballero and another officer, concluded in their report that “a sexual assault did not occur.”

Caballero said he was stunned by Corsie’s email and the response he had given her that day 10 years ago. He immediately picked up the phone and called her.

That interaction sparked Corsie and co-director Amy Rosner to create their short film, aptly titled “Second Assault,” which HuffPost is exclusively premiering below. “Second Assault” is a documentary-style film that follows Corsie as she confronts the people who failed her after she reported her rape in 2005.

“The film is about my journey to confront a system that failed me, and also to confront the culture that we live in — and how that supports this idea of a second assault, which isn’t necessarily just what happens when you report, but also what happens when your friends and boyfriends and people around you don’t believe you,” Corsie told HuffPost in 2017 when she and Rosner were still crowdfunding.

SECOND ASSAULT
David Caballero and Jillian Corsie meet in person for the first time. 

In the film, Corsie confronts Caballero face-to-face and tells him about their interaction 10 years prior. Caballero, for his part, is open and honest about his missteps and points to a lack of trauma-informed training as a reason for his insensitive response.

“Having that conversation with him just allowed me to let go of all of the anger that I had been holding against him for more decades,” Corsie told HuffPost last week. “To have him ― without question, without meeting me, without knowing my motive ― show up and put himself on camera is a huge risk on his part. And I’m really grateful for what he did and what he continues to do.”

Caballero was so taken by Corsie’s letter that he shared her email with his entire team, telling HuffPost he wanted to make sure his officers “understood that their words matter.”

“Whatever I did, whatever I said back then needed to be corrected. It needed to be done in a way where I needed to take full responsibility for the response that we gave her back then,” Caballero said, adding that, at the time, they believed they were responding correctly with the training they had been given.

“Second Assault,” which premiered at multiple festivals last year, has won several awards, including Best Director at the Global Impact Film Festival and Audience Choice Award at the Julien Dubuque International Film Festival.

Rosner and Corsie hope the film starts a much-needed conversation about how the criminal justice system, and society as a whole, responds to sexual assault survivors.

“This conversation alone has had a ripple effect in both Jillian and David’s lives, and I think, if possible, we need to have these conversations more openly,” Rosner said.

These days, when Caballero sits down at his desk, he’s greeted by Corsie’s letter, which is framed and hung up on on his wall.

“Every day,” he said, “I look at Jillian’s letter and it reminds me words matter.”

Watch the exclusive premiere of “Second Assault” below. 

 

Source: 10 Years Later, She Confronted The Cop Who Said Her Rape Was ‘Consensual’ | HuffPost UK

Just 1.5% of all rape cases lead to charge or summons, data reveals | Law | The Guardian


Only one in 65 rape cases reported to police result in suspects being summonsed or charged, a Guardian analysis of the latest crime figures has revealed.

The most recent Home Office statistics highlight an alarming decline in rape prosecutions in England and Wales over recent years amid increasingly acrimonious rows over the disclosure of evidence and suggestions that CPS prosecuting policies changed.

The drop is particularly dramatic at a time when victims are reporting more attacks. Four years ago one in seven or 14% of cases led to a suspect being charged or summonsed – a total of 4,908 in 2015-16. Last year fewer than one in 65 reports of rape (1.5%) resulted in a charge or a summons, for a total of only 886 in 2018-19.

 

Source: Just 1.5% of all rape cases lead to charge or summons, data reveals | Law | The Guardian

My sexual assault case was dropped when I refused to give police my phone | Anonymous | Opinion | The Guardian


A few years ago I was violently sexually assaulted by a “friend” on a night out. It was a sustained and sadistic attack that in no way began with consent. I made the incredibly difficult decision to report it to the police because I needed to take power back. I wanted to look him in the eyes in court and watch him feel a fraction of the helplessness and humiliation that I felt that night. I wanted to tell him I had the power now, with the full weight of the law behind me. Unfortunately it didn’t work out as I expected.

 

Source: My sexual assault case was dropped when I refused to give police my phone | Anonymous | Opinion | The Guardian

Company behind People’s Vote used controversial Blue Telecoms in referendum campaign | The SKWAWKBOX


  • Open Britain, the company behind the People’s Vote campaign, was originally The In Campaign/Stronger In
  • Blue Telecoms was the company exposed in a Channel 4 undercover operation that led to a warning to the Tories from the Information Commissioner and a lengthy police investigation
  • TIC/Stronger In also contracted Blue Telecoms for apparently identical services, according to Blue Telecoms’ CEO

For full disclosure, the author of this article voted ‘remain’ in the EU referendum.

Saturday’s march in London by the “People’s Vote” campaign that is run by the organisation Open Britain has highlighted the strength of feeling among a significant number of people eager to reverse the UK’s impending departure from the European Union.

Stronger In

Open Britain claims to be a ‘grassroots’ campaign, but is run by or associated with an array of centrists and Tories – and critics of the campaign have accused it of being a vehicle for attacks on the Labour leadership.

 

Source: Company behind People’s Vote used controversial Blue Telecoms in referendum campaign | The SKWAWKBOX

Raped, Forced to Marry, Then Sold to a Brothel – FreedomUnited.org


West Bengal has the infamous title of being the state with the highest number of trafficking cases in India. In fact, it accounts for 44% of all human trafficking cases in the entire country. And local corruption is driving the problem.

Tabassum (not her real name) was only 14 when she was raped by a neighbor. But when she went to the police with her father to report the crime, village councilors and officers said they would not accept her report.

It turned out the man who raped her and his family were members of the local unit of the Communist Party of India (Marxist), which held power in the area. As a result, the police did everything they could to prevent the rapist from being charged.

Incredibly, Tabassum says “They made me marry my rapist so that the charges could not be used against him.”

After marrying the man, she says her in-laws began torturing her to the point that she decided to file a domestic violence case. Yet as she was on the way home after meeting her lawyer a woman befriended her on the train and offered her a glass of water. After drinking it, Tabassum woke up in a brothel in Delhi.

 

Source: Raped, Forced to Marry, Then Sold to a Brothel – FreedomUnited.org