Meghan gets twice as many negative headlines as positive, analysis finds | Global | The Guardian


Guardian analysis appears to support claim Duchess of Sussex receives more critical treatment than Duchess of Cambridge

Source: Meghan gets twice as many negative headlines as positive, analysis finds | Global | The Guardian

Simply by defying the tabloids, Meghan has already beaten them | Zoe Williams | Opinion | The Guardian


Win or lose against the Mail on Sunday, the princess has displayed courage in breaking free of the media’s expectations, says Guardian columnist Zoe Williams

Source: Simply by defying the tabloids, Meghan has already beaten them | Zoe Williams | Opinion | The Guardian

If the Press Can Publish Harry and Megan’s Correspondence, then We Should See Murdoch and Co’s


The National Press always want it their way, but yes, they should be transparent and ‘Conflicts of Interest; should be made public.

How do we know that this interest in ;Harry and Meghan; may also be a Conflict of Interest.

The press state that Harry and Meghan should not have ‘their cake and eat it’, but it appears it is OK for The Press to do so. Hypocrisy in all its connotations.

Beastrabban\'s Weblog

Harry and Meghan and suing the Mail on Sunday for publishing a letter from Megan to her father. And today, that bastion on the British press – and as the late Terry Wogan used to say of the Beeb, ‘there are many basty ‘uns in there’  – the MoS set out its defence. It’s the old ‘public interest’ argument. They’re going to argue that Meghan and Harry don’t have the same right to privacy as the rest of us, because they’re private correspondence and activities are of interest to the public. Zelo Street has put up a piece demolishing it by showing how circular the argument is. The letter, and anything else the royal couple writes or does, is of interest to the public because the press tells them it is. Zelo Street states

What the MoS is setting out in its defence is that what it did is…

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Harry and Meghan need to know that freelance life isn’t a walk in the park | Gaby Hinsliff | Opinion | The Guardian


When royals try to be entrepreneurial or work with billionaires, it doesn’t usually go well. Still, there’s always the acting, says Guardian columnist Gaby Hinsliff

Source: Harry and Meghan need to know that freelance life isn’t a walk in the park | Gaby Hinsliff | Opinion | The Guardian

Royal wedding shows growing irrelevance of monarchy and press | Roy Greenslade | The Guardian


The extraordinary scenes on Saturday as the Queen welcomed an American actor into her family cloaked an uncomfortable reality. Despite the apparent public appreciation of the pomp and pageantry, the monarchy’s hold on its position is nothing like as stable as the hysteria might suggest.

Nor should the 230 pages of coverage of the event in Sunday’s national newspapers blind us to the fact that the days of newsprint are numbered too. Without denying that there was an intense and genuine public interest in the marriage of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, we need to remove the blinkers to view it for what it is: a turning point in Britain’s history.

In truth, two institutions, monarchy and the press, are walking hand in hand towards their doom after 400 years of interdependence. Viewed rationally, we can see how popular newspapers – which is an oxymoronic term nowadays – spent months manufacturing synthetic public excitement about the marriage. Their coverage, far from reflecting modernity, was marked by all the old tropes: fawning fascination, carping criticism, preposterous speculation and the elevation of the trivial to an implausible level of significance.

 

Source: Royal wedding shows growing irrelevance of monarchy d press | Roy Greenslade | The Guardian

Camilla shouldn’t be Queen, say public: And four in ten say Charles should step aside and let William be king


Original post from Daily Mail

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  • Majority of British public doesn’t want to Camilla to be Queen, poll reveals 
  • Nation is completely split on whether Prince Charles should become king 
  • Princes William and Harry are the most popular members of royal family 
  • Prince Andrew languishes at the bottom of the popularity table

A majority of the public does not want Camilla to become queen if Prince Charles succeeds to the throne, a poll for the Daily Mail reveals today.

And the nation is completely split on whether Charles should become king at all.

Only 43 per cent believe he should ascend to the throne compared with an almost identical number saying he should stand aside in favour of his elder son Prince William.

William and Prince Harry are the most popular members of the Royal Family, closely followed by the Queen and the Duchess of Cambridge.

Scroll down for video 

Four out of ten people think Prince Charles should give up his right to be king so the crown passes straight to William (pictured with his wife, the Duchess of Cambridge)

Prince Andrew languishes at the bottom of the popularity table, with his brother Edward not far ahead. Camilla and Andrew are the only two royals who are more disliked than liked, according to the poll.

Despite courtiers’ efforts to have Camilla accepted into the nation’s hearts, 55 per cent are against the Duchess of Cornwall becoming queen when her husband becomes king.

This is down from 73 per cent opposition at the time of her wedding to Charles in April 2005, but shows she has yet to win over most of the country.

However, she is no longer regarded as the main culprit for the break-up of Charles’s marriage to Princess Diana. The prince himself is held most to blame by 39 per cent, followed by Diana on 13 per cent and Camilla on 12 per cent.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/embed/video/1172757.html

There is still great affection for Diana, who died in a Paris car crash 18 years ago, with a substantial majority saying she would have made a better queen than Camilla.

Intriguingly, the younger generation is most attached to her even though many of them were not old enough to remember her when she was alive. Among 18 to 24-year-olds, two out of three would have preferred Diana to be queen, while only 3 per cent backed Camilla.

Charles’s wedding to Camilla divided the country at the time, and ten years on people remain uncertain about its wider significance for the Royal Family. Fifteen per cent said the marriage had strengthened the monarchy but 24 per cent believed it had weakened it; just over half felt it had no impact.

Camilla, 67, was once reviled as the woman whose love affair with Charles, 66, destroyed his relationship with Diana, who was 36 when she died in 1997.

PASS THE CROWN, CHARLES: FOUR IN TEN SAY WILLIAM SHOULD BE KING 

Prince William and his son George

Four out of ten people say Prince Charles should give up his right to be king so the crown passes straight to William.

Britain is evenly split on the question of whether Charles should succeed to the throne when the Queen dies, the poll reveals.

William has the female vote, with 43 per cent of women saying he should be the next monarch compared to 37 per cent of men.

Young people are also much more likely to favour the Duke of Cambridge as king, with 53 per cent of 18 to 24-year-olds urging his father to step aside.

But 43 per cent of the public back Charles to take over from his mother, with a clear majority of over-55s wanting him as Britain’s next monarch.

The findings suggest that support for the Prince of Wales to wear the crown may actually have dipped slightly in the past decade.

In 2005 a survey found that 53 per cent of people thought he should be king despite his marriage to Camilla, and 43 per cent said he should not.

The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall outside St George's Chapel, Windsor after their civil wedding in 2004

Senior officials at Clarence House have nurtured the duchess’s image with carefully chosen public appearances. She has won widespread praise for her charity work, dedication to attending royal functions around the country and emergence as a style icon for older women.

The Duchess of Cornwall is patron or president of 85 charities, and has undertaken nearly 1,700 royal engagements in Britain and more than 600 abroad since 2005.

Yet the survey reveals how Camilla’s past continues to affect how she is perceived. Just over a third said they had grown to like her more over the past decade, and nearly two-thirds thought Charles was happier with her than he ever was with Diana.

Prince Andew languishes at the bottom of the popularity table

But only a quarter felt the Duchess of Cornwall had been a good influence on the Royal Family, and a similar proportion argued that her marriage to the prince had ‘stained’ the royals’ reputation.

Four in ten say Charles should give up his right to be king so the crown passes straight to William. Among those aged 18 to 24, that figure rises to 53 per cent.

But overall 43 per cent of the public back Charles to take over from his mother, with a clear majority of over-55s wanting him as the next monarch.

Support for the monarchy itself remains very high, with the 88-year-old Queen and the younger royals – William, Harry and Kate – hugely popular.

By contrast, Prince Andrew was least popular, with only 30 per cent liking him. Charles, Prince Philip and Princess Anne were ranked in the middle.

Only 19 per cent would back turning Britain into a republic, although the figure rises to 36 per cent in Scotland, perhaps a by-product of the SNP’s unsuccessful independence campaign last year. Charles, who is said to favour a ‘slimmed down’ monarchy, will be buoyed by the finding that 56 per believe that the royals should be reduced to the Queen’s immediate family only.

By law Camilla will automatically become Queen Consort when Charles is king, but privately officials continue to debate whether she should use a lesser title to avoid controversy.

The official position has been that she intends to be known as Princess Consort, but in recent years Camilla and Charles have dropped a number of hints that they would like her to be queen.

Asked in 2010 whether his wife would take the title, Charles replied: ‘We’ll see, won’t we? That could be.’

The duchess herself says ‘You never know’ when she faces questions about whether she will become queen.

Nearly two-thirds of people thought Charles was happier with Camilla than he ever was with Diana (pictured)

POPULAR PRINCES: WILLIAM AND HARRY ARE THE MOST-LIKED ROYALS

Princes William and Harry are the most popular members of the royal family, the survey found.

Nearly eight out of ten people said they ‘liked’ the princes, with the Duchess of Cambridge and the Queen receiving similarly high ratings.

Women were significantly more likely to approve of the younger royals – 84 per cent said they were fans of Prince Harry compared to 75 per cent of men.

By contrast, Prince Andrew was the least popular of the royals, with only 30 per cent of respondents saying they liked him.

Prince Charles, his father Prince Philip and his sister Princess Anne were ranked in the middle.

Camilla divided opinions most sharply. Thirty-four per cent of people said they liked her, but 38 per cent disliked her.

The survey did not ask people what they thought of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s son Prince George, who is now nearly two.

Princes William and Harry are the most popular members of the royal family

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