If the Press Can Publish Harry and Megan’s Correspondence, then We Should See Murdoch and Co’s


The National Press always want it their way, but yes, they should be transparent and ‘Conflicts of Interest; should be made public.

How do we know that this interest in ;Harry and Meghan; may also be a Conflict of Interest.

The press state that Harry and Meghan should not have ‘their cake and eat it’, but it appears it is OK for The Press to do so. Hypocrisy in all its connotations.

Beastrabban\'s Weblog

Harry and Meghan and suing the Mail on Sunday for publishing a letter from Megan to her father. And today, that bastion on the British press – and as the late Terry Wogan used to say of the Beeb, ‘there are many basty ‘uns in there’  – the MoS set out its defence. It’s the old ‘public interest’ argument. They’re going to argue that Meghan and Harry don’t have the same right to privacy as the rest of us, because they’re private correspondence and activities are of interest to the public. Zelo Street has put up a piece demolishing it by showing how circular the argument is. The letter, and anything else the royal couple writes or does, is of interest to the public because the press tells them it is. Zelo Street states

What the MoS is setting out in its defence is that what it did is…

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One simple graphic cuts through spin: why Labour must not go ‘full referendum’ | The SKWAWKBOX


Inevitably, the media – and a coterie of remain-supporting MPs in and out of the Labour Party – have spun last night’s European Parliament election results to support a claim that results for pro-referendum parties, primarily the LibDems, mean Labour must abandon its manifesto commitment to enacting the 2016 Brexit result and commit to a ‘new referendum with remain on the ballot paper’.

But if a picture paints a thousand words, the one below speaks volumes. Taken from the BBC’s EU vote results page, it combines two colour-coded results maps, one showing the density of LibDem votes across the country – and the other the density of Brexit party support in the same election:

 

Source: One simple graphic cuts through spin: why Labour must not go ‘full referendum’ | The SKWAWKBOX

The dark history behind Trump’s inflammatory language – The Washington Post


It is remarkable, in retrospect, how many and varied were the dictatorships of the past century. Murderous regimes — states that killed large numbers of their own citizens for political reasons — arose in every possible type of society. Communist, fascist and tribal ideologies evolved in places whose cultural histories, economic status and religious traditions had nothing in common. Wealthy Germany and impoverished Rwanda. Buddhist Cambodia and Orthodox Russia.

Yet these different regimes did all have one thing in common. It was the obsession that one French scholar , writing of Cambodia, called the “mania for classification and elimination of different elements of society.” In each one of them, the groundwork for violence against a specific group — whether an ethnicity, an economic class or a political faction — was originally laid by a very particular way of using language.

In the first instance, inflammatory language was used to define an ethnic minority and to give it fictional characteristics and properties. In some cases, the targeted “tribe” was entirely fictional, created by rhetoric alone. In China, the regime sought to identify the enemy as “Blacks,” as opposed to the friendly “Reds.” The Russian Bolsheviks defined and blamed the “Enemies of the People.” The Khmer Rouge in Cambodia sought to eliminate the “75ers,” the people who had been expelled from cities in 1975.

After the unwanted group had been defined, propaganda was used to demonize and dehumanize it. In the Soviet Union, Vladimir Lenin characterized Russia’s ex-rulers as “former people,” as if their humanity had somehow been dissolved by the revolution. Germany’s Adolf Hitler and Russia’s Joseph Stalin went further, describing unwanted categories of human beings as “vermin” or “parasites” or “poisonous weeds.” The Nazis even made posters, depicting Jews as lice.

For the past half-century, memory of where it once led has made this kind of language taboo in Western democracies. Now it is undeniably back. I am not comparing President Trump or his European counterparts to Lenin or Hitler; even to do so gives all of them a significance they don’t deserve. But they have brought back the “mania for classification and elimination of different elements of society,” and this will have real consequences.

It is worth noting how often the president repeatedly conflates refugees with illegal immigrants and MS-13 gang members. This is not an accident: He has targeted a group and given them characteristics — they are violent, they are rapists, they are gang members — that don’t belong to most of them. He then describes them with dehumanizing language. Democrats, he has tweeted, “want illegal immigrants, no matter how bad they may be, to pour into and infest our country, like MS-13.” The image of “infestation” evokes, again, vermin and lice. A few weeks earlier, he spoke of MS-13 as “animals,” once again making it unclear whether he meant actual gang members or simply those who distantly resemble them.

 

Source: The dark history behind Trump’s inflammatory language – The Washington Post

Trump to CPAC: ‘Now you finally have a president, finally’ – The Washington Post


Trump sought to portray his fledgling administration as one of action: pulling out of a major trade deal, reducing regulations, cracking down on illegal immigrants and clearing the way for construction of major oil pipelines.

Source: Trump to CPAC: ‘Now you finally have a president, finally’ – The Washington Post

Now all news is “fake news”: The right’s war against truth goes back long before 9/11 – Salon.com


Donald Trump and his media allies have convinced millions of Americans that there’s no such thing as the truth

Source: Now all news is “fake news”: The right’s war against truth goes back long before 9/11 – Salon.com

Electoral College to Determine if “Trump is Fit to Serve as President” on News of Russia Hacks


In a development with the shocking potential to upend the U.S. presidential election, ten Electoral College electors have requested further insight into President-Elect Donald Trump’s alleged ties to Russia to determine “whether Mr. Trump is fit to serve as President of the United States.”

Led by Christine Pelosi, daughter of Democratic House leader Nancy Pelosi, the group of ten electors penned an open letter to Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, stating:

Allegations that Donald Trump was receiving assistance from a hostile foreign power to win the election began months before Election Day. When presented with information that the Russian government was interfering in the election through the course of the campaign, both in private briefings and public assessment, Donald Trump rejected it, refused to condemn it, and continued to accept their help. Donald Trump even made a direct plea to the Russian government to interfere further in the election in a press conference on July 27, saying, ‘Russia, if you’re listening, I hope you’re able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing.’

Jeremy Corbyn ‘walked past empty seats before filming himself on the floor of a ram-packed train’ – Wales Online


 

Just who is lying here and who is endeavouring to make a political statement.

On this Virgin train it will be possible to reserve seats, as was visible from the video, so why did Corbtn not reserve his seat.  Surely Corbyn knew well in advance of his need to make this train journey, so he or his staff could have used an online booking service, where reserving seats is part of the process. Also by using online booking it would be possible to obtain the best economical fare for the journey.

The train system allows passengers to obtain tickets upto the departure of the service, so even with advance booking no operator will know up front how many passengers will be taking the journey, so in some instances the train could become over crowded. To put more trains on is not easy as these have to fit into the train scheduling, so can not be brought in on a moments notice. To put on longer trains these need to take into account the platform lengths of station stops on route.

To use this as a ploy for renationalisation implies that the previous nationalised British Railways was up to standard. This was certainly not the case. My father worked on British Railways in the 50s and 60s, so all journeys we made as a family were by train. I therefore made many train journeys from a Sheffield departure where I found most trains did not run to time and the rolling stock was filthy and outdated. I can not comment on the travel costs then as being part of a railway persons family there were no costs for travel from the family.

From my experience a nationalised industry is but a political tool, where investment is turned on and off for political motives. The railway was a British invention, but due to ack of investment and for sight the invention was taken up by other countries and with progressive investment programmes their rail systems far exceeded those of Britain.

To renationalise the rail system will only produce the same. The example of the East Coast line is not relevant as this was done for political motives, when it was taken over in 2009 due to the private company National Express East Coast not making a profit and further subsidies were refused. The political motive was to show how a renationalise network could be better than the privatised, but if the whole national network was renationalised there would be no private company to compare with, so it would fall into political management procedures and end up as before privatisation pre1994.

 

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Jeremy Corbyn’s team have said the statement by Virgin Trains is “a lie”

Source: Jeremy Corbyn ‘walked past empty seats before filming himself on the floor of a ram-packed train’ – Wales Online

Russian News May Be Biased – But So Is Much Western Media


Stop Making Sense

Dr. Piers Robinson writes for The Guardian:

As tensions continue to escalate with Russia, increasing attention is being paid in western media to what are frequently described as the “propaganda” activities of Vladimir Putin’s regime. The Sun headlines“Putin’s glamorous propaganda girls who front a new UK-based news agency ‘that aims to destabilise Britain’” in reference to the recent establishment of Sputnik News in Edinburgh, while the Mail describes how “Vladimir Putin is waging a propaganda war on the UK”.

Most recently in the Times, a study by an MPhil student at the University of Oxford, Monica Richter, is reported to confirm that people who watch the 24-hour English-language news channel Russia Today (RT) are more likely to hold anti-western views. The tone of the Times article is clear: RT uses unqualified and “obscure” experts, is frequently sanctioned by Ofcom for bias and failure to remain impartial and, worst…

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Blair is correct: Jeremy Corbyn’s principles are indeed dangerous – to profiteers and careerists


Political Concern

A Moseley reader sends a link to an article in which – after disastrously encouraging the various ‘Arab Spring’ uprisings, for whatever motive – Tony Blair has the nerve to deplore such upheavals in a ‘a major western country’, saying that it would be a “very dangerous experiment” if Jeremy Corbyn or a populist politician like him were to form a government.

tony blairIn an interview with BBC2’s This Week’s World, Blair – looking increasingly ‘hag-ridden’ – rejected the truth that his wheeler-dealing and lack of care for those he was elected to serve was responsible for widespread popular welcome for Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership.

He pleads for the centre ground to get ‘its mojo’ back and seemed particularly concerned about foreign policy- receiving, as he does, a large proportion of his income from less than admirable powers abroad.

Mere unpopularity or deep-seated, long-lasting revulsion?

Andrew Sparrow, the Guardian’s political correspondent, mildly…

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