Childhood schizophrenia: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment : Medical News Today


Schizophrenia usually starts in adulthood, but it can sometimes affect children. Find out how to recognize it and the treatments available.

Source: Childhood schizophrenia: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment : Medical News Today

Americans on the right and left change their minds after hearing where Trump stands : The Conversation


In recent years, voters have shifted their views on issues based upon the positions of politicians – even when that shift clashes with their ideology.

Source: Americans on the right and left change their minds after hearing where Trump stands : The Conversation

Girls have ADHD too – here’s why we may be missing them : The Conversation


Asked what they know about attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, many people will likely tell you that it mostly affects children, and mostly boys. However, recent research has shown that neither of these perceptions is entirely true.

There is a striking difference in the sex of children diagnosed with ADHD, with boys more likely to be diagnosed than girls (the ratios can be as high as 9:1 in some studies). However, these studies are of children who have an established diagnosis of ADHD, and such estimates are affected by referral patterns (for example, parents may be more likely to take their sons in for an ADHD assessment), so they may not reflect the true sex ratio.

Indeed, when we estimate the occurrence of ADHD in the population as a whole, rather than just in children at clinics, we find that a lot more girls meet diagnostic criteria than is reflected in the estimates from clinics. The same equalising trend between the sexes is visible when looking at adults with a diagnosis of ADHD. Taken together, this suggests that there are a substantial number of girls with ADHD going undiagnosed in childhood, with potentially serious implications for the effects of their untreated symptoms in childhood, adolescence and adulthood.

Why are girls less likely to be diagnosed?

One reason that fewer girls are diagnosed with ADHD is that girls may be more likely to have the inattentive-type ADHD symptoms, rather than the hyperactive and impulsive symptoms that are more common in boys. The issue is that while inattention and an inability to focus will cause problems for a child, such symptoms may be less disruptive and noticeable for parents or teachers, which means that these children’s ADHD may go unrecognised.

Considering that diagnostic criteria were created based on studies of boys, they are likely to be better geared towards the identification of ADHD in males. This has led to a stereotypical image of ADHD as a “disruptive boy”, even though it is becoming more widely recognised that ADHD also affects large numbers of females and adults.

 

Source: Girls have ADHD too – here’s why we may be missing them  The Conversation

Childhood bullying can cause lifelong psychological damage – here’s how to spot the signs and move on : The Conversation


Childhood bullying is so common that it may not seem like a big deal. Up to 35% of people are estimated to have experienced it at some point. By adulthood, we are generally expected to have “got over” it. But the mental health effects of being bullied can be serious and last a lifetime. One study has even suggested that, when it comes to mental health, bullying is as harmful as child abuse, if not worse.

Approximately 20% of people who have been bullied experience some kind of mental health problems later in life, even at the age of 50. While some of these, such as post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), are easy to spot, others may be more difficult to recognise. These can range from inexplicable bouts of anger to a lifetime of feeling inferior to other people.

Although there has been an immense amount of research on bullying, most of it has focused on immediate effects, intervention and prevention. So we need more research on long-term effects and new forms of bullying, such as online abuse.

 

Source: Childhood bullying can cause lifelong psychological damage – here’s how to spot the signs and move on : The Conversation

One Teacher’s Brilliant Strategy to Stop Future School Shootings | Reader’s Digest


A few weeks ago, I went into my son Chase’s class for tutoring. I’d e-mailed Chase’s teacher one evening and said, “Chase keeps telling me that this stuff you’re sending home is math—but I’m not sure I believe him. Help, please.” She e-mailed right back and said, “No problem! I can tutor Chase after school anytime.” And I said, “No, not him. Me. He gets it. Help me.”

And that’s how I ended up standing at a chalkboard in an empty fifth-grade classroom while Chase’s teacher sat behind me, using a soothing voice to try to help me understand the “new way we teach long division.” Luckily for me, I didn’t have to unlearn much because I’d never really understood the “old way we taught long division.” It took me a solid hour to complete one problem, but I could tell that Chase’s teacher liked me anyway. She used to work with NASA, so obviously we have a whole lot in common.

Afterward, we sat for a few minutes and talked about teaching children and what a sacred trust and responsibility it is. We agreed that subjects like math and reading are not the most important things that are learned in a classroom. We talked about shaping little hearts to become contributors to a larger community—and we discussed our mutual dream that those communities might be made up of individuals who are kind and brave above all.

And then she told me this.

 

Source: One Teacher’s Brilliant Strategy to Stop Future School Shootings | Reader’s Digest

The Image Of God


Thank you for this posting and am I surprised at the Judges deliberation on the ruling related to the sentence.

My response is yes and no.

Yes, because it would appear that there has been no justice for Lorien Norman’s eight-month-old daughter Evie. I also believe the Judge is wrong in that Evie’s injuries were ‘likely to resolve’. This may be so for any visible signs or markings, but what about the invisible injuries of which many may not have been currently manifested, as is the case with any psychology injuries which may or may not manifest for some years to come.

While No, as this may be a one off occurrence and Lorien Norman may, in fact, really learn from this, that this behaviour is not and never will be acceptable and she will never have any re-occurrence to Evie or anyone else. If she was given a custodial sentence then Evie could have lost the continued bonding with her mother Loren Norman forever and this in itself could have lasting psychological effects.

A case that can be right or wrong or may be both no matter which actions the Judge had taken.

The religious effect may have a bearing as this itself could have some bearing on how Loren Norman progresses in her life. But many people especially today are not religious or have different religions all with their own interpretations of how religion conducts itself within their lives for there are also many religions and people should have the freedom to chose their own religion or conversely to have no effective religion.

For those who do take on board a specific religion there is then the degree in which they take on their chosen religion, as on reflecting on all religions there will be different aspects taken on board in each religion by each individual person.

In effect we should all be understanding of each others beliefs and respect each persons individual choice, as a religion should be there for the person and not the person for the religion.

We should have the freedom of choice and the freedom to apply this choice in anyway we wish and to what degree we do so.

There is a proviso in that this choice of religion and the degree should not have any adverse effect on any other individual within the same religion or in any other religions.

I am not saying do not preach unto others, but do respect all other religions and all individuals.

We have all seen where fanaticism can lead in the formation of ISIS (Daesh), but this is not restrictive to Islam as it can occur in any religion as there are extreme fanatics in Judaism, Christianity, Hinduism to name just three more.

There is a great need for more tolerance within the World as the World should be large enough to accommodate all beliefs.

The surprising science of fidgeting


Hand-held toys known as “fidget spinners” – marketed as “stress relievers” – have become so popular and distracting in classrooms that they are now being banned in many schools. And it’s not just kids who like to fidget. Look around your office and you will probably see people bouncing their legs up and down, turning pens over and over in their hands, chewing on things, sucking on their lower lips and pulling bits of their beard out – seemingly completely unconsciously.

But why do we fidget, and why do some people do it more than others? And if it really helps to relieve stress, does that mean we should all embrace it?

These are actually rather difficult questions to answer, as there appear to be various definitions of what fidgeting is and why it happens. However, there are some interesting, if unexpected, theories.

Regulating attention

Cognitive research suggests that fidgeting is associated with how stimulated we are. That is, fidgeting may be a self-regulation mechanism to help us boost or lower our attention levels depending on what is required – either calming or energising us.

People who fidget a lot are generally more prone to mind wandering and daydreaming. We also often tend to fidget while our mind is wandering during a task. If your mind wanders, you are likely to perform more poorly on whatever task you are doing. Similarly, you typically perform worse while you are in the process of fidgeting – this has been shown to affect memory and comprehension.

Source: The surprising science of fidgeting

Psychologists warn Donald Trump ‘displays all the classic signs of being mentally ill narcissist’ : Daily Mirror.


Trump could be many things and mentally ill could be one.

But it could be that he is just a bully and feels he is the ‘Chosen One’ a Messiah to vanquish all his believed ills pertaining to his blinkered view of America.

His family background is one of promoting oneself above all others, for this determines being successful, to allow to consider others will reduce the qualifying nature of success, which in Trumps eyes would be failure, which he can never allow himself to be.