Public Health England is playing Russian roulette with vulnerable residents | Care Industry News


A York care home operator has accused Public Health England of playing Russian roulette with some of her homes’ most vulnerable residents.

Source: Public Health England is playing Russian roulette with vulnerable residents | Care Industry News

Factory worker, 57, is first Briton to die from lung disease ‘linked to vaping’ | Daily Mail Online


  • Terry Miller, 57, from Gateshead is the first death to be attributed with vaping 
  • Ex-factory worker’s body was found to have oils saturating his lungs in 2010
  • Vaping linked with 200 health problems including pneumonia, says UK report
  • In US 13 people have died due to vaping and more than 800 have fallen ill

A 57-year-old British factory worker has today been named as the first e-cigarette user in the world feared to have developed a fatal disease directly linked to his vaping habit.

Terry Miller, 57, from Gateshead, Tyne and Wear, died nine years ago after developing lipoid pneumonia and doctors said oil from vaping fluid was found in his lungs.

His wife Glynis believes her husband’s death was hastened by his use of e-cigarettes – claiming he was better off still smoking.

Mrs Miller has today called for a new inquest into his death after the first one in 2010 recorded an open verdict.

She says that back then Public Health England did not have the evidence to back up its claim about the safety of e-cigarettes, which are used by 3million people in Britain.

Her husband’s case has been highlighted as a report from the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency said vaping hit the health of 200 British e-cigarette users since 2014.

In America, there are fears that 13 people have died due to vaping and more than 800 have fallen ill – all recorded after Mr Miller died in 2010.

 

Source: Factory worker, 57, is first Briton to die from lung disease ‘linked to vaping’ | Daily Mail Online

Vaping likely has dangers that could take years for scientists to even know about


The rise in cases of otherwise healthy young adults who have been hospitalized or even died from vaping-associated lung injury is alarming.

Many people don’t know what is contained in these vaping devices, what the reported health effects actually mean, and, most importantly, why all of this developed so quickly, considering that e-cigarettes have only been popular for fewer than 10 years.

Vaping describes the process of inhaling aerosols generated by devices such as e-cigarettes.

When e-cigarettes first came to the U.S. in 2006, many smoking cessation experts were optimistic. They viewed the delivery of nicotine through e-cigarettes to be a useful alternative to traditional cigarettes. That is because e-cigarettes did not have all of the other harmful combustion products inhaled through cigarette smoke. Since there is no doubt that smoking traditional cigarettes is harmful to your health – and the number one cause of preventable death in the U.S. – e-cigarettes were marketed as a “safer” alternative.

As an inhalation toxicologist, I study how inhaled chemicals, particles and other agents affect human health. Since e-cigarettes were introduced, I have been concerned about how the scientific community could possibly know the full spectrum of their dangers. After all, it took decades for epidemiologists to discover that regularly inhaling the smoke from burning plant material, tobacco, caused lung cancer. Why would the scientific community be so quick to assume e-cigarettes would not have hidden dangers that might take years to manifest too?

 

Source: Vaping likely has dangers that could take years for scientists to even know about

Vaping likely has dangers that could take years for scientists to even know about : The Conversation


Many smokers have reported that switching from cigarettes to e-cigarettes has helped their physical well-being, including reduced coughing.

But a few randomized clinical trials examining the use of e-cigarettes as a cessation tool have shown mixed results. While some trials demonstrate a significant increase in cessation success (from 9.9% to 18%), people using e-cigarettes were much more likely to remain dependent on nicotine as compared to those randomized for more traditional nicotine replacement products, such as nicotine patch, gum and nasal spray. Or, they were more likely to relapse to using cigarettes.

In short, whether, how, and to what extent e-cigarettes have potential as a cessation tool is not yet settled, especially considering that more than 80% of smokers randomized to use e-cigarettes continued to smoke after the cessation trial.

Safer than a spitting cobra

Cessation claims aside, the messaging of e-cigarettes as a “safer” alternative may have led many of the 3.6 million teenagers in the U.S. who use e-cigarettes today to believe these devices are “safe.” “Safer” does not equal “safe,” and the messaging of “safer” was based on comparisons to cigarettes.

 

Source: Vaping likely has dangers that could take years for scientists to even know about : The Conversation

What is the killer MERS virus? All you need to know as man rushed to Royal Liverpool Hospital – Liverpool Echo


Some laboratory-confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection are reported as asymptomatic, meaning that they do not have any clinical symptoms but prove positive for MERS following a laboratory test.

Most of these asymptomatic cases have been detected following aggressive contact tracing of a laboratory-confirmed case.

Royal Liverpool Hospital treating man with deadly disease considered ‘urgent threat to humanity’

How deadly is it?

Approximately 35% of reported patients with MERS have died.

However, the virus does not seem to pass easily from person to person unless there is close contact, such as occurs when providing unprotected care to a patient.

Outbreaks have occurred in several countries, with the largest outbreaks seen in Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, and the Republic of Korea.

Is there a prevention or treatment?

 

Source: What is the killer MERS virus? All you need to know as man rushed to Royal Liverpool Hospital – Liverpool Echo

Air pollution is a lethal blight that shames our politicians | John Vidal | Opinion | The Guardian


Three years ago I had a heart operation that will have cost the NHS tens of thousands of pounds, and which made me rethink how we lived and how I had got into this mess. I had always kept pretty fit, I thought: I ate well, loved exercise and had long stopped smoking. I thought I was active and healthy. So what else was there that could have contributed to my heart disease, Britain’s costliest and most prevalent killer, and the world’s greatest epidemic?

Last week came solid evidence that living in toxic Britain can seriously harm your health. Cardiologists at Queen Mary University of London found that even “safe” levels of air pollution are linked to heart abnormalities similar to those seen during the early stages of heart failure. Their study of almost 4,000 people was backed up by a major US study which showed that higher exposure to fine particles and nitrogen oxides is linked to an acceleration in the hardening of the arteries.

We have long known that air pollution leads to coughing, shortness of breath and irritation in the eyes, nose and throat. It is also clearly linked to respiratory diseases such as asthma and bronchitis, as well as diabetes and some cancers. But the more researchers look at people’s long-term exposure to air pollution, the worse the picture gets, and the more dangerous the minute particles and chemicals emitted by sources including fossil fuels are found to be. It is now beyond doubt that children’s health is greatly affected, and links have been made between it and Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, dementia and congenital birth defects.

 

Source: Air pollution is a lethal blight that shames our politicians | John Vidal | Opinion | The Guardian

Stay well this winter as Public Health England urges people to get the flu jab | Care Industry News


People who are the most vulnerable to flu are being urged to get their free vaccination ahead of the winter period when the virus is most common.

Source: Stay well this winter as Public Health England urges people to get the flu jab | Care Industry News

RSPH | Greater collaboration and recognition key to increasing pharmacy’s public health role


A new report published by RSPH and Public Health England, has identified a number of opportunities and challenges for community pharmacy teams to further support the public’s health. The report, based on research conducted in early 2016, provides a snapshot of the extent to which pharmacy teams are supporting the public’s health, the opportunities and challenges they may face and what can be done to address the challenges.Read the full report hereWith around 11,647 pharmacies nationally, including 2,100 Healthy Living Pharmacies (HLPs), community pharmacy has an important role to play in championing the public’s health. Receiving approximately 1.2 million health-related visits every day, public trust in the health advice of pharmacists and their teams is on a par with that of nurses, opticians, and dentists. The report identifies a clear appetite among pharmacy teams to support the public’s health further – almost three-quarters (74%) of pharmacy team respondents said that the sector is underutilised – and points to some challenges. Pharmacy team respondents in non-HLPs are more likely to say they are being under-utilised (82%), compared to HLPs (63%). The key opportunities identified by pharmacy teams include:Opportunities for greater utilisation of pharmacy teams to improve the public’s health, taking account of:

Source: RSPH | Greater collaboration and recognition key to increasing pharmacy’s public health role

HPR volume 10 issue 35: news (14 October) – GOV.UK


A weekly digest of health protection related news and surveillance reports from Public Health England.

Source: *HPR volume 10 issue 35: news (14 October) – GOV.UK

 

Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.