It’ll cost Johnson £14bn to keep his promises on social care. Will Javid pay up? | Polly Toynbee | Opinion | The Guardian | Carer Voice


Restoring care standards even to 2010 levels will blow a big hole in the chancellor’s budget in March, says Guardian columnist Polly Toynbee

 

Source: It’ll cost Johnson £14bn to keep his promises on social care. Will Javid pay up? | Polly Toynbee | Opinion | The Guardian | Carer Voice

Mental health campaigner Claire Greaves dies in Cygnet unit


Picture of a young white woman with dark hair tied up with a large clip at the back of her head, wearing a white T-shirt with the logo "Beat eating disorders", a rainbow-striped pair of long socks and a pair of black leggings with a white flower pattern on them.

I learned this morning that Claire Greaves, a mental health blogger and campaigner who has worked with Mind, Fixers and eating disorder charity Beatuntil she was moved to a secure unit in 2016, and who tweeted under the handle @mentalbattle, has died in an eating disorders unit run by the private company Cygnet, owned by Pennsylvania-based Universal Health Services, in Coventry. Although she suffered from anorexia which nearly killed her in early 2017, sources on Twitter say she took her own life. She had been moved to that unit in May 2017 after five months in a mainstream hospital receiving tube-feeding after the crisis brought on by the anorexia in the Partnerships in ‘Care’/Priory-run secure unit, Ty Catrin, in south Wales, the conditions of which were the subject of this interview and which she wrote about on her blog here.

Source: Mental health campaigner Claire Greaves dies in Cygnet unit

Small changes can make a big difference to the quality of care : The Guardian


It takes bravery and humility for those on the receiving end of complaints to listen and act

By Michael King

Complaints to the ombudsman last year led to nearly 230 changes to social care systems and practice. Photograph: Dean Mitchell/Getty Images

It takes courage for someone to raise concerns about their care. Less obvious is the bravery and humility it takes to listen with an open mind to complaints when you are on the receiving end – but for those who do there is real evidence it can have a big impact on improving the quality of services.

Our latest annual review of social care complaints proves this point. Last year our investigations resulted in more than 1,300 recommendations to put things right, 11% more than the previous year. Despite the extreme challenges faced by the sector, I’m heartened that in all but one case councils and care providers reacted positively and made practical changes.

That demonstrates the mature attitude displayed by many staff and managers in acknowledging fault, remedying suffering and using complaints to bring about positive change. Last year this led to nearly 230 changes to systems and practice. These are often simple, sensible steps on the frontline, such as training staff in the use of bed rails, keeping an inventory of people’s possessions or giving clear written explanations of fees and charges. These small changes make a big difference.

We have the power to extend the scope of our investigations into an individual case if we suspect that other people have suffered an injustice. In these circumstances, a single concern can benefit many people.

In one example, a couple complained about their respite care being halved to four weeks without a proper needs assessment. As full-time carers of an adult relative with learning disabilities, this change had a huge detrimental impact on their lives. When we investigated, we found the council had imposed a blanket policy on all carers to restrict respite support as part of a wider aim to reduce costs.

Following our intervention, the council not only agreed to reinstate the couple’s respite provision, but also agreed to look at everyone else affected. Because of this one complaint, cuts were reversed for 69 other families and the policy was changed.

Positive outcomes like this rely on managers and care workers engaging constructively. Strong leadership is essential to foster how to learn from complaints and empower those on the frontline to respond quickly and with confidence to concerns, but nothing replaces the role of care workers who can help encourage people to talk about their experiences. If someone feels their concerns will be acted on and valued, they are more likely to come forward.

In 2016-17 the number of complaints we received about independent care providers continued the upward trend we have seen for the last seven years. I welcome it as a sign of a greater openness and accountability and want to thank everyone who has responded to our calls to make complaint processes more visible and who are letting people know about their right to go to the ombudsman. I would urge others to do so.

Of greater concern is the number of complaints we uphold. Last year we found faults in nearly two thirds of the adult social care investigations we carried out, the highest level of problems we find in any aspect of our work. Given the well-documented challenges, that might not be a surprise.

At a time of unprecedented pressures on adult care, complaints need not be a burden. They can offer rapid and free feedback on how things are working, they can act as a cost-effective early warning of wider problems, and in an era when so much is measured by performance indicators and statistics, listening to people’s concerns brings a warmer, human lens through which we can better understand the real experiences of real people receiving care.

Source : Small changes can make a big difference to the quality of care : The Guardian

Leaked Brexit report on EU migration policy will create ‘a perfect storm’ for social care | Care Industry News


The ability of the homecare sector to recruit and retain sufficient care workers will be significantly challenged if proposals contained in a leaked Home Office

Source: Leaked Brexit report on EU migration policy will create ‘a perfect storm’ for social care | Care Industry News

CQC figures reveal hundreds of care homes have gone two years since last inspection | DisabledGo News and Blog


More than 300 residential care homes for younger disabled adults have not been inspected by the care watchdog for more than two years, according to official figures obtained by Disability News Service (DNS). The figures, released by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) in response to a freedom of information request, also show that 87 care homes in England have not had an inspection since 2014. And 10 homes have not had an inspection for between three and four years. In all, the CQC figures show that, on 1 June 2017, there were 311 care homes for adults under 65 (out of a total of 5,358 homes across England) that had not had an inspection by the regulator in the previous two years. Despite DNS alerting CQC to the figures on Monday, the commission failed to respond to requests for a comment by noon today (Thursday). The commission’s press office claimed today that its “team of analysts” were not clear how the figures were compiled, even though the press office has been told that they were

Source: CQC figures reveal hundreds of care homes have gone two years since last inspection | DisabledGo News and Blog

Social care system ‘beginning to collapse’ as 900 carers quit every day | DisabledGo News and Blog


More than 900 adult social care workers a day quit their job in England last year, new figures reveal. Service providers warn that growing staff shortages mean vulnerable people are receiving poorer levels of care. In a letter to the prime minister, the chairman of the UK Homecare Association said the adult social care system – which applies to those over the age of 18 – has begun to collapse. The government said an extra £2bn is being invested in the system. An ageing population means demand is increasing for adult social care services. Those who provide care to people directly in their own homes, or in nursing homes, say a growing shortage of staff means people face receiving deteriorating levels of care. “You just can’t provide a consistent level of care if you have to keep recruiting new people”, said Sue Gregory, who has been a care home nurse in North Yorkshire for 13 years. “Its very simple, not many people want to do this kind of work, and this is a profession that relies on

Source: Social care system ‘beginning to collapse’ as 900 carers quit every day | DisabledGo News and Blog

Nurse shifts left unfilled at nearly every hospital in England, figures show | DisabledGo News and Blog


Analysis of official data finds 96% of NHS hospital trusts had fewer nurses covering day shifts than they had planned Almost every hospital in England has fewer nurses on duty than each believes are needed to guarantee safe patient care, research shows. Analysis of official data by the Health Service Journal (HSJ) found that 96% of NHS hospital trusts in England had fewer nurses covering day shifts in October than they had planned and 85% did not have the desired number working at night. The disclosure of such widespread failure to ensure hospitals are properly staffed has prompted fresh concern that a chronic lack of nurses and the NHS’s dire finances are putting patient safety at risk. Almost every hospital in England has fewer nurses on duty than each believes are needed to guarantee safe patient care, research shows. Analysis of official data by the Health Service Journal (HSJ) found that 96% of NHS hospital trusts in England had fewer nurses covering day shifts in October than

Source: Nurse shifts left unfilled at nearly every hospital in England, figures show | DisabledGo News and Blog

What are the costs of social care that have rocketed in the last year? And why did they rise so sharply? | Vox Political


The problem with this article – and any others that discuss rocketing costs – is that it doesn’t say what those costs are, and it doesn’t say why they have risen. Is it the …

Source: What are the costs of social care that have rocketed in the last year? And why did they rise so sharply? | Vox Political

Action on Elder Abuse welcomes new CQC guidance on visiting rights to care homes | Care Industry News


Action on Elder Abuse (AEA) has welcomed new guidance published today by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) regarding visiting rights to care homes.

Source: Action on Elder Abuse welcomes new CQC guidance on visiting rights to care homes | Care Industry News

CQC inspectors publish reports on 99 adult social care services in the Central region | Care Industry News


In the past week the Care Quality Commission has published a further 99 reports on the quality of care provided by adult social care services across the Central

Source: CQC inspectors publish reports on 99 adult social care services in the Central region | Care Industry News