The Cyprus rape case is a chilling reminder of the price women pay for speaking up | Gaby Hinsliff | Opinion | The Guardian


It is impossible to feel justice has been done for the British teenager in the Cyprus rape case, says Guardian columnist Gaby Hinsliff

Source: The Cyprus rape case is a chilling reminder of the price women pay for speaking up | Gaby Hinsliff | Opinion | The Guardian

The Cyprus case shows how easily rape victims are let down and distrusted | Joan Smith | Opinion | The Guardian


Treating women as untrustworthy witnesses is almost universal, says chair of the Mayor of London’s Violence Against Women and Girls Board Joan Smith

Source: The Cyprus case shows how easily rape victims are let down and distrusted | Joan Smith | Opinion | The Guardian

Harvey Weinstein: trio of accusers refuse to sign ‘inadequate’ settlement | Film | The Guardian


The disgraced movie mogul was close to settling civil claims for sexual assault but now three women have broken ranks

Source: Harvey Weinstein: trio of accusers refuse to sign ‘inadequate’ settlement | Film | The Guardian

Just 1.5% of all rape cases lead to charge or summons, data reveals | Law | The Guardian


Only one in 65 rape cases reported to police result in suspects being summonsed or charged, a Guardian analysis of the latest crime figures has revealed.

The most recent Home Office statistics highlight an alarming decline in rape prosecutions in England and Wales over recent years amid increasingly acrimonious rows over the disclosure of evidence and suggestions that CPS prosecuting policies changed.

The drop is particularly dramatic at a time when victims are reporting more attacks. Four years ago one in seven or 14% of cases led to a suspect being charged or summonsed – a total of 4,908 in 2015-16. Last year fewer than one in 65 reports of rape (1.5%) resulted in a charge or a summons, for a total of only 886 in 2018-19.

 

Source: Just 1.5% of all rape cases lead to charge or summons, data reveals | Law | The Guardian

My sexual assault case was dropped when I refused to give police my phone | Anonymous | Opinion | The Guardian


A few years ago I was violently sexually assaulted by a “friend” on a night out. It was a sustained and sadistic attack that in no way began with consent. I made the incredibly difficult decision to report it to the police because I needed to take power back. I wanted to look him in the eyes in court and watch him feel a fraction of the helplessness and humiliation that I felt that night. I wanted to tell him I had the power now, with the full weight of the law behind me. Unfortunately it didn’t work out as I expected.

 

Source: My sexual assault case was dropped when I refused to give police my phone | Anonymous | Opinion | The Guardian

Thong protest in Belfast raises concerns over rape trials | UK news | The Guardian


It was a mere scrap of fabric, deep blue and edged with lace. But when the legislator Ruth Coppinger drew it from her sleeve and held it up in the Irish parliament this week, the item of women’s underwear caused consternation among her colleagues.

Elsewhere, women took to the streets carrying lingerie. In Cork, dozens of thongs were laid on the steps of the courthouse. In Belfast on Thursday, protesters tied knickers to placards and chanted: “My little black dress does not mean yes.”

Thousands of women posted pictures of their underwear on Twitter under the hashtags #IBelieveHer and #ThisIsNotConsent.

The trigger for protests across Ireland, and the eruption of fury on social media, was the words of a lawyer defending a man accused of rape in a trial in Cork.

Suggesting the complainant – 17-year-old woman – was “open to meeting someone”, Elizabeth O’Connell said: “You have to look at the way she was dressed. She was wearing a thong with a lace front.”

The defendant was acquitted in a unanimous verdict following deliberations by the jury lasting 90 minutes.

According to Fiona Ryan, a city councillor in Cork, anger over the defence counsel’s comments on 6 November took a few days to build.

“It didn’t blow up at first, it was almost a delayed reaction. But it festered,” she said. Ryan suggested staging a protest in Cork on Wednesday, eight days after the end of the trial, and was astonished when up to 500 people turned up to take part, many carrying items of underwear.

 

Source: Thong protest in Belfast raises concerns over rape trials | UK news | The Guardian

Why we need to break the silence around rape and violence against women | Waqar Azmi | Opinion | The Guardian


Today marks the 22nd anniversary of the worst atrocity on European soil since the second world war, the genocide in Srebrenica. This year, thousands will gather at more than 400 events in the UK to commemorate those who were murdered in the genocide and to reflect on how hatred is affecting our communities here in the UK and what we can do to prevent this.

Last year reminded us that the UK cannot afford to become complacent about community cohesion, with some sections of the media and certain political figures stirring up hatred in our communities and a 41% increase in reported hate crime in the aftermath of the EU referendum. A disproportionate level of this hate crime has been targeted at women. At the same time, reported violence against women in the UK has reached an all-time high. As in Bosnia, the root of these crimes is the dehumanisation of others – the belief that the perpetrator is superior by reason of sex, race or nationality, and has the right to control, humiliate or hurt their victims.

If we want to build stronger, safer, more cohesive communities, we must name and address the issue of male violence against women and girls and recognise that hatred and dehumanisation are the root of this. We must include sexism and violence against women and girls in our fight against all forms of identity-based hatred.

That’s why we are breaking the silence by inviting women such as Bakira Hasečić, president of the Association of Women Victims of War and a survivor of genocidal rape, to speak about their experiences at commemorations in the UK. Bakira is one of the bravest women I have ever met. By speaking out

Source: Why we need to break the silence around rape and violence against women | Waqar Azmi | Opinion | The Guardian

Piers Morgan is wrong about Lady Gaga. Here are the facts about PTSD | Eleanor Morgan | Opinion | The Guardian


His tweets questioning Lady Gaga’s PTSD reveal an ignorance of this complex condition which we must challenge at every opportunity

Source: Piers Morgan is wrong about Lady Gaga. Here are the facts about PTSD | Eleanor Morgan | Opinion | The Guardian