Autism patients: GPs in England urged to keep register | DisabledGo News and Blog


GPs in England are being encouraged to keep a register of patients with autism in order to improve the care they receive. Health chiefs say a register would alert GPs to the specific needs of adults and children with autism and help tailor services for them. The National Autistic Society said it would “help improve the health and wellbeing of autistic people”. But getting a quick diagnosis was still an issue, a child autism charity said. Autism is a lifelong, developmental disability that affects how a person communicates with and relates to other people, and how they experience the world around them. GPs in England already keep a register of patients with learning disabilities, and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence thinks patients with autism should be easily identified by healthcare professionals too. NICE says a register – which would be anonymous outside a patient’s surgery – would help staff to adapt their approach to suit patients’ needs. For example, doctors

Source: Autism patients: GPs in England urged to keep register | DisabledGo News and Blog

Disabled MP forced to miss Commons debates because he has nowhere to sit | DisabledGo News and Blog


The parliamentary authorities should do far more to make the House of Commons accessible, according to a disabled MP who has faced a series of major barriers in his first weeks since being elected. Jared O’Mara, who has cerebral palsy, has had to rely on support from other Sheffield MPs to secure some of the adjustments he needs to do his job. But nearly a month into his new role, he is still having to miss some debates in the House of Commons chamber because he cannot stand for longer than five or 10 minutes and there have been no seats free. He told Disability News Service (DNS): “There has been a couple of times where I have not been able to get a seat and so I have not been able to attend. “The thing is with the Commons chamber, it is 650 MPs but there’s not 650 seats, so for busy events… there’s not enough seats for everybody. It’s ridiculous in this day and age.” He is full of praise for the speaker, John Bercow, who has given him permission to wear a tee shirt, and no tie,

Source: Disabled MP forced to miss Commons debates because he has nowhere to sit | DisabledGo News and Blog

Here’s how you can help people with learning disabilities cast their vote | Community Care


A piece about how social care provider Dimensions has created a voting passport to help people with learning disabilities vote in the 2017 election

Source: Here’s how you can help people with learning disabilities cast their vote | Community Care

Employing disabled people isn’t just about building ramps | Scope’s Blog


Abbi was born with a genetic bone disease called osteogenesis imperfecta, also known as ‘OI’ or brittle bones. In this blog, she talks about some of her own experiences and what she thinks needs to…

Source: Employing disabled people isn’t just about building ramps | Scope’s Blog

Police force launches review of hate crime procedures, after activist’s complaint | DisabledGo News and Blog


Police have been forced to launch a major review after refusing to treat online attacks against a leading disabled activist as disability hate crimes. And a second police force has upheld a series of complaints made by the activist, Doug Paulley, relating to the same disability hate offences. Paulley’s email hosting provider – which is linked to his website – had been subjected to what his service provider described as a “serious” and “targeted” cyber-attack just a few weeks after he won a high-profile and ground-breaking Supreme Court ruling in January. The Supreme Court found that First Bus had breached its duty to make reasonable adjustments for disabled people, as a result of its failure to ensure that wheelchair-users should have priority in the use of dedicated wheelchair spaces. But in the wake of the ruling, which received high-profile media coverage, Paulley received a flood of “very sweary” emails and online comments attacking him for taking the case. Early the following

Source: Police force launches review of hate crime procedures, after activist’s complaint | DisabledGo News and Blog

Disabled people ‘denied access to justice by failure of judges on reasonable adjustments’ | DisabledGo News and Blog


Disabled people are being denied access to justice because of judges’ failure to make the reasonable adjustments that would make the court process accessible to them, according to a disabled human rights barrister. John Horan said the legal profession was failing to address the discrimination faced by disabled people who rely on family and commercial courts, employment and benefits tribunals, and the criminal justice system. One of the reasons for this failure is the pressure exerted on the legal system by government cuts to the courts and tribunals system budget, he has told Disability News Service (DNS). He says the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) provides a clear duty – under article 13, on access to justice – for UK courts to provide the necessary “accommodations” to ensure that every disabled person can play an “effective role” in all legal proceedings. But he says judges (and magistrates) are ignoring detailed guidance laid out in the Equal

Source: Disabled people ‘denied access to justice by failure of judges on reasonable adjustments’ | DisabledGo News and Blog

Bank finally admits it failed disabled customer, after three-year battle | DisabledGo News and Blog


A disabled activist has won a three-year battle with his bank over its refusal to allow him to communicate by email and provide him with a direct telephone contact number as reasonable adjustments.

The Financial Ombudsman ruled that the Co-operative Bank had failed in its duties under the Equality Act, and awarded Adam Lotun £800 compensation.

He had repeatedly asked over more than three years for the bank to make reasonable adjustments to take account of his hearing impairment, autism and memory problems.

As well as turning down Lotun’s request for a way to communicate with the bank by email, it failed to provide a direct telephone number for him and other disabled people to contact staff who were trained to deal with customers with access needs.

 

 

Source: Bank finally admits it failed disabled customer, after three-year battle | DisabledGo News and Blog

In Britain, it’s not just the train toilets that disabled people can’t get into | DisabledGo News and Blog


For the majority of us planing an outing is not that difficult, but when a disabled person and especially a disabled person using a wheelchair, this can be a minefield.

you need to double check everything and then you can not be guaranteed that all will go to plan. For all transport needs to be adequately accessible and so do the venues and this includes the toilets. What can be stated as being accessible is many times not correct. This may not be intentional by the transport providers and the venue operators, but mainly through their ignorance of the different aspects of disabilities and the varying requirements.

Even if all are suitably accessible will there be a sufficiency of the numbers available. Bus seating being only one example for there will only be one space available and this could be already taken by standing passengers or passengers with prams, who may be reluctant to move from a disability space and I believe that there is no lawful requirement for them to do so, just respect for the disabled person or persons.

Until there is a lawful requirement to provide full disability access and the educating of the Government, business and the general public there can be no full equality for people who are disabled, for the Equality Act is not sufficient.

 


A few years ago I met friends at a restaurant that had been getting great reviews. I triple-checked that they had wheelchair access (their website made no mention of access) and was assured that they did. Google Street View – I’d checked – showed a mammoth step, but they promised me a ramp. The ramp, as I found when I arrived, was a hastily arranged plank of wood, which they were hoping to shunt me up. Failing that, the chef and waiters would carry me – Cleopatra-style, but without the dignity. “Don’t worry,” the manager said. “The chef is very strong.” Options limited, I reluctantly agreed.

Source: In Britain, it’s not just the train toilets that disabled people can’t get into | DisabledGo News and Blog

‘One-fifth of cancer patients face work discrimination’ | DisabledGo News and Blog


Almost one-fifth of people (18%) diagnosed with cancer face discrimination from employers or colleagues on return to work, research by the charity Macmillan

Source: ‘One-fifth of cancer patients face work discrimination’ | DisabledGo News and Blog