GOP Support For Impeachment Grows As Republicans Say They’ll Vote Against Trump | HuffPost UK


It would now appear that some Republicans in the Senate and Congress have now come to their senses and see Trump for what he is, no matter how belatedly this is.

For Trump has done and still is causing serious damage to the Republican Party, who now appear to see to it that Trump can never be elected to Governing Office again.

I feel it is forgone that the Impeachment resolution will have no problems coming through the Congress, but the hurdle will be the Senate.

 

Source: GOP Support For Impeachment Grows As Republicans Say They’ll Vote Against Trump | HuffPost UK

Capitol breach prompts urgent questions about security failures – The Washington Post


This was and is a disgraceful state of affairs, but it has been coming ever since Trump joined the Presidential election of 2016 and even more so since he became President.

The Republican Party has by degree or design allowed him enormous leeway and Trump is adept in using this to his advantage, in fact, believing that it amounts to acceptance of his actions.

In fact, in viewing some of the actions of the law enforcement at the US Capital building it may even be true that they are in agreement with Trump. This is especially so, when barriers were removed by some law officers, thereby offering even more encouragement to Trump’ mob.

This action by Trump and his supporters has been forecast for sometime and now it has come to fruition.

If the required actions are not taken against Trump and his supporters, then this can only get worse.

 

Source: Capitol breach prompts urgent questions about security failures – The Washington Post

RNC: Trump paints Biden as a ‘radical’ candidate and a danger to America | US news | The Guardian


President accepts Republican presidential nomination in event staged at White House, raising ethical concerns

Source: RNC: Trump paints Biden as a ‘radical’ candidate and a danger to America | US news | The Guardian

Will Republicans ditch Trump to save the Senate as support nosedives? | US news | The Guardian


The human and economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic has transformed the political landscape and increased talk of a sinking ship

Source: Will Republicans ditch Trump to save the Senate as support nosedives? | US news | The Guardian

Trump’s Nazification of the GOP is why there’s serious discussion of killing off the ‘unfit’ – Alternet.org


“Very fine people” at the deadly 2017 Nazi rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.Under Donald Trump, the Republican Party is racing toward a transformation that mimics the greatest evil of the 20th century. Long before the Nazis fully engaged with genocidal murder against the Jews, there were perse

Source: Trump’s Nazification of the GOP is why there’s serious discussion of killing off the ‘unfit’ – Alternet.org

‘Really a sociopath’: Psychiatrist explains how ‘fragile’ Trump is both an authoritarian strongman and a baby : RawStory


A senior official in the White House wrote an anonymous op-ed in the New York Times declaring that Trump is unfit for office and a danger to American democracy. (According to literary scholar Don Foster’s analysis for Salon, the likely author is Defense Secretary Jim Mattis.) On at least two other occasions, White House insiders reached out to Yale University psychiatrist Dr. Bandy Lee with their concerns that Donald Trump was “unraveling” and that they were “scared” by his behavior. According to a New York Times report, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein considered secretly recording Donald Trump as part of a broader plan to recruit senior administration officials and Cabinet members to invoke the 25th Amendment and remove Trump from the presidency.

Donald Trump’s lack of mental wellness continues to be on full display. Last week, in an almost 90-minute press conference Trump showed once again that he is detached from empirical reality, declaring that China respects him because of his “very, very large brain,” misrepresenting the facts and habitually lying about matters large and small. On Saturday night at a rally in West Virginia, Trump showed his authoritarian inclinations and grandiose, malignant narcissism by declaring that he and North Korea’s murderous dictator, Kim Jong-un, “fell in love” because of the “beautiful letters” they exchanged.

What are the origins of Donald Trump’s mental health issues? How does his childhood help to explain his pathological adult behavior? Is Trump capable of self-reflection and empathy? Is he in fact a sociopath? Is Trump’s infantile behavior and chronic lying unprecedented in the history of the American presidency? Why are some people so intensely attracted to Trump and what he represents — and what does his power over his supporters reveal about their collective mental health and psychological well-being?

In an effort to answer these questions I recently spoke with Dr. Justin Frank. He is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the George Washington University Medical Center

 

Source: ‘Really a sociopath’: Psychiatrist explains how ‘fragile’ Trump is both an authoritarian strongman and a baby : RawStory

Exclusive – Largest U.S. business group attacks Trump on tariffs


WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the nation’s largest business lobbying group and customarily a close ally of President Donald Trump’s Republican Party, is launching a campaign on Monday to oppose Trump’s trade tariff policies.

 

Source: Exclusive – Largest U.S. business group attacks Trump on tariffs

Trump Leaves GOP Leaders Out To Dry On Immigration


Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and other Republican leaders thought President Donald Trump could be the magic bullet for accomplishing the elusive GOP goal of passing an immigration bill. Instead, he’s looking more like the death blow.

After telling House Republicans Tuesday night that he backed both of their immigration proposals “1,000 percent,” Trump has gone soft. He first asked on Thursday what the purpose was of the House passing immigration bills if the Senate was just going to reject a GOP-only bill ― a fair point. Trump then stepped up the Twitter criticism Friday morning to say, “Republicans should stop wasting their time on immigration” until after the November elections, where he improbably predicted a “Red Wave.”

 

Source: Trump Leaves GOP Leaders Out To Dry On Immigration

I lost because I wasn’t Trump enough. All Republicans should worry. – The Washington Post


They say elections have consequences, and if this is so, we should all be concerned over the recent primary along the coast of South Carolina. I know it well. I lost.

I’ve been involved in politics for a long time in my state and have run and won in tough races. This one was like no other. The operative question was not about conservative policies that are normally the lifeblood of a Republican primary, but rather who on the ballot would more loyally support the president.

I wasn’t Trump enough in the age of Trump — and so indeed I lost. As one of 435 members of the House, this shouldn’t matter to someone living in Fairfax or Cleveland, but, based on what I saw on election night, I think it will.

We should all be alarmed when dissenting voices are quashed. President Trump is not the first executive to want compliance from a legislative body, but he has taken it to a new level. This is more than a problem; it’s a challenge to one of the most basic of American tenets — that we can agree to disagree.

Our Founding Fathers baked dissent into the cake of our political system. It’s one of their most vital gifts. The constitutionally designed tug-of-war between branches of government was not for efficiency; it was to prevent too much power ending up in one place.

This represents my biggest disagreement with the president, and it is certainly part of what was at play during my district’s primary election.

I’m a conservative, and I have overwhelmingly supported the president on the issues he attempted to advance. But because I haven’t been 100 percent supportive, and have spoken out on areas where we disagreed, he injected himself into the race to oppose me as he did. This suggests his concern was over personal loyalty, rather than issue loyalty. That’s a problem in a system built on compliance to laws and the Constitution — not a single man.

The Republican Party is going through an identity crisis. We need to decide who we are. I believe we are meant to be the party of

 

Source: I lost because I wasn’t Trump enough. All Republicans should worry. – The Washington Post