As Rosa Parks is celebrated in TV drama, real life shows we have slid backwards | Vox Political


As an iconic TV drama celebrated a black woman who changed the world by sitting down on a bus, RyanAir dragged our entire culture backwards by throwing a black person out of their plane seat, on the insistence of a racist.

The BBC broadcast one of its most powerful and moving episodes of Doctor Whoin years on the evening of Sunday, October 21. Entitled Rosa, it was about the moment when a black woman took a seat in a whites-only section of a bus in Montgomery, Alabama, and was arrested for it. This led to the Montgomery bus boycott, in which black people refused to use the service – and to the capitulation of the bus company to their demand (to be able to sit wherever they wanted) around one year later. From there, the American civil rights movement grew and attitudes changed radically.

The TV drama made perfectly clear the reasons for change. As iNews put it in its review, “Last week… the Doctor and her team had to survive on a ‘cruel’ planet full of monsters. And yet that alien setting could never match the reality of deep south America; of the shock of Ryan [Tosin Cole] being slapped by a white man in the street and threatened with lynching; of the tension of seeing Ryan and Yaz [Mandip Gill] do something as banal as sit in a restaurant; of the danger suggested by the camera lingering on the holster of a cop’s gun; of the thematically bold spectacle of the Doctor sitting in the white section of a segregated bus, while Ryan has to sit at the back.”

For This Writer, a crucial scene took place beyind a trash bin, where Ryan and Yaz discuss the need to do nothing to provoke the racists – because you never know who will react with violence.

 

Source: As Rosa Parks is celebrated in TV drama, real life shows we have slid backwards | Vox Political

Rosa Parks: How the civil rights activist’s role in the Montgomery Bus Boycott changed a nation – The i – Weekend Reads #65


On the early evening of December 1, 1955, civil rights activist Rosa Parks boarded a bus in Montgomery, Alabama.

As was the law in the racially-segregated state, Parks took a seat in the designated area for black passengers as the back of the Cleveland Avenue bus. However when the bus began to fill up, she was commanded to move and give up her seat to a white man – a demand which she refused.

Turning point

Her brave defiance led to her arrest, an event which in turn sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott – one of the greatest turning points in the struggle for civil rights the era has ever seen.

And still, 63 years later, Parks is as eminent a figure in the present as she was past. She has been an honouree of countless awards and dedications, written into a several songs and revived in a handful of programs and documentaries.

Most recently her story features in an episode of BBC One’s Doctor Who, which sees the Doctor and her friends encounter Parks while on their first journey back in time to Alabama.

Source: Rosa Parks: How the civil rights activist’s role in the Montgomery Bus Boycott changed a nation – The i – Weekend Reads #65

Rosa Parks, dies at 92; civil rights icon set wheels of justice in motion – LA Times


Rosa Parks, the Alabama seamstress whose simple act of defiance on a segregated Montgomery bus in 1955 stirred the nonviolent protests of the modern civil rights movement and catapulted an unknown minister named Martin Luther King Jr. to international prominence, died Monday of natural causes at her home in Detroit. She was 92.

Source: Rosa Parks, dies at 92; civil rights icon set wheels of justice in motion – LA Times