A fifth of disabled people say they will not leave home until a coronavirus vaccine is found


‘In addition to the survey, Scope has written to prime minister Boris Johnson, calling for him to prioritise the needs of disabled people, 59 per cent of whom are worried about being forgotten by the government.’

The other 41% realise that they have never been remembered by this government and never will be.

Unlawful Do Not Resuscitate Orders For Disabled Covid Patients ‘Outrageous’ : Forbes : The Learning Disabilities Daily


The coronavirus pandemic has seen an unprecedented rise in doctors placing unlawful Do Not Resuscitate orders on the medical records of people with learning disabilities. Many disabled people also fear they would be placed at the back of the queue if there was a shortage of hospital ventilators.

Source: Unlawful Do Not Resuscitate Orders For Disabled Covid Patients ‘Outrageous’ : Forbes : The Learning Disabilities Daily

We knew we had to share our story | Scope’s Blog


Dan and Aimee White, parents of Emily (13) who was born with spina bifida, share their journey as Storyteller for Now is the Time campaign and call for a Minister for Disabled Children and Families.

When you first receive the news that your child will be disabled, you expect to be given all the support needed and a system will be there to guide you, so you won’t feel so isolated and sucker punched. The reality is that this does not happen. There is a void where charities, benefits, support groups and aftercare are not easy to reach.

So, when Scope called last year and asked us to be the face of their new campaign, Now is the Time, and share our story we knew we had to do it. The campaign asked people to sign a petition to call for a Minister for Disabled Children and Families to be in post. Last week, Emily, proud in her wheelchair, went to Downing Street to hand the 40,000 signature strong petition in.

 

Source: We knew we had to share our story | Scope’s Blog

Young disabled people share their hopes for equality


This is great and shows that having a disability does not mean you can’t engage in any aspect of Society. It may not be easy to engage, but Society has to make the reasonable adjustments to ensure there is equality in access.

It may be that Society, while it should, is not sure what reasonable adjustments are required and that again does not mean it can not be done. For if Society does not know then Society needs to ask those that do to achieve equality.

In effect good communication and working together needs to be part of the process, so everyone is engaged with each other.

If this was achieved would not, only, the UK be a better place, but this could be extended to the World at large.

Scope's Blog

Regardless of who we are or where we are from, we must work together to ensure that every member of society has an equal chance to participate in our democracy and to have their say.

Carly Jones MBE hosted an EqualiTeas event at Scope, inviting young disabled people to meet, talk about equality and democracy, eat cake and decorate biscuits! An event championed by UK Parliament, aiming to bring UK communities together to explore what equality means to people.

Carly is an autism advocate who has been tirelessly campaigning for equality for years after her own battle to get a diagnosis.

Here’s Carly’s story.

I asked Scope if they could support a celebration of the “equality of voting rights”, EqualiTeas event at their new Here East offices at Queen Elizabeth Park, Stratford. Here I am talking to the Scope team about the event.

Scope team filming Carly who is sat on a sofa. Carly being filmed.

My hope in…

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DBC gives evidence to Work and Pensions Select Committee


The 4 witnesses from Citizens Advice, Scope, National Mencap and Sense are certainly tell the Work and Pension Select Committee about their findings regarding PIP and ESA assessments, but to what effect.

Hopefully the Select Committee will use this and other evidence to make major changes to the PIP and ESA progresses to improve them for the betterment of all claimants.

It makes good business sense to be accessible


Scope's Blog

Cerrie Burnell is a children’s author and actress changing attitudes towards disability through raising the profile of diversity. In this blog, she talks about why we need better representation of disabled people in the media, marketing campaigns and the public eye.

The household spend of disabled people amounts to more than £240 billion a year.

I’m not a person with a keen mathematical mind. 240 billion is a number I find almost unfathomable, like gazing at a clear night sky and trying to count stars, whilst simultaneously sipping wine – where would it end. But it’s not a fathomless figure, it’s a very real amount, and yet every year like stars at dawn, this amount of money slips away almost unnoticed by the marketing industry.

Why? Because the spending power of the disabled community has not been fully recognised. And more importantly positive representation has not been maximised. At all…

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“We had never thought about disability seriously until Oliver was born”


It is great when we all hear stories such as these, especially in the current climate of many areas of negativity.

In general the Learning Disability community may not be a vast as some other forms of disability, although there are vast numbers of persons with LD with its many related conditions and each person may be different in many ways, but the numbers of related condition and their effects are may be more vast than other disability areas.

LD is an unknown for many within the UK and its press and Government perception is not generally good, thus progressing the negativity relating to LD to the public at large. But this negativity is certainly very misplaced and this negativity needs to be urgently reversed.

While the LD community is very progressive more collective activity needs to be generated and not only between the large national charities, as there are many local independent small and relatively large charities and a vast arrange of support groups, which in the very austere financial climate are not receiving sufficient funding and in many vases no funding at all.

Now is the time for all to come together and in doing so all other related medically based charities to provide wherever possible a joint solid front to the authorities especially on a local level and with these local authorities to central government, which will eventually achieve more for us all and enhance the lives of our loved ones.

Scope's Blog

Chris is taking part in RideLondon for Scope next weekend. When his son, Oliver, was born with an undiagnosed condition, Chris didn’t know who to turn to for support.

We had never thought about disability seriously until Oliver was born. Oliver has an undiagnosed genetic condition which has certain physical manifestations. He was born with fused fingers and he has a cleft palate. He has some other conditions and a severe learning disability but it’s quite hard to describe. If your child has Cerebral Palsy or something that has a name, then you know where to go because there are people who will support you for that.

Oliver, a young child wearing glasses, smiles

We’ve also found out that Oliver is very strongly on the autistic spectrum as well. This came as quite a surprise to us because he has a very good sense of humour. He is very naughty but not in a bad way. He…

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Virgin Media and Scope club together to show disability discrimination the red card | DisabledGo News and Blog


Virgin Media and disability charity Scope are teaming up to highlight disability discrimination in football grounds. New research published today shows that disabled football fans feel excluded from live games. Eight in ten who attend football stadiums across the UK say they have experienced some form of discrimination or other issues resulting from their disability. As a result, the majority (62%) of these disabled fans said these experiences had stopped them from going to a live match again. To highlight the issue and to put disabled fans at the heart of the game, the Saints will wear a special Scope-branded shirt for their home match against Manchester United FC on Wednesday 17 May. Virgin Media, the official shirt sponsor of Southampton FC, is removing its logo from the club’s strip to support its charity partner, Scope, in order to get behind disabled football fans. It forms part of the company’s partnership with the charity to help transform the lives of disabled people. Virgin Media

Source: Virgin Media and Scope club together to show disability discrimination the red card | DisabledGo News and Blog

Scope’s decision to close Disability Now ‘is a tragedy’ | DisabledGo News and Blog


The disability charity Scope is to close its disabled-led online publication Disability Now (DN) in a bid to cut costs, more than 30 years after it first appeared as a newspaper. But questions have been asked over Scope’s decision to continue publishing DN-branded content on its own website. DN was first published, under a different name, in 1984, first as a newspaper, then as a magazine, and finally in an online-only format four years ago. But Richard Lane, Scope’s head of communications, said the charity had now decided that DN was “no longer a viable business in its current format”. DN’s only member of staff, its disabled editor Ian Macrae – it also used a number of disabled freelances – has apparently been made redundant, although the charity has not confirmed this. Lane said the charity had decided to close the publication because of the major changes in “the variety and diversity of media and content covering disability issues” over the last three decades. He said: “At an

Source: Scope’s decision to close Disability Now ‘is a tragedy’ | DisabledGo News and Blog