Brexit could cause break-up of UK, says ex-Chancellor George Osborne | Daily Mail Online


So, George Osbourne, former Chancellor of the Exchequer, is saying Brexit could be the cause of the break up of the UK, well, if it is then so be it.

But, it is not Brexit, but the actions of previous Governments, with Brexit being the easiest reason to put forward, for previous Governments, be they Labour or Conservative, could not be the cause, could they!

George was never in favour of Brexit, but, then, I was never in favour of George.

Brexit will, eventually, be good for England and any other country within the UK who stays with England.

As to Brexit, I did vote to leave and my conviction to do so, is only strengthened more each day, when I see how the EU is prolonging the discussions on the terms of a Trade Deal between the UK and the EU, for they only wish to punish the UK for daring to leave the EU and to show others who are not happy being in the EU, how they would be treated, if they wished to leave,

What I would say, is if I had known in 1975 what I know now I would have voted to leave then, instead, I mistakenly voted to stay in 1975, my worst vote ever.

Goodbye EU, but hello Europe, for we wish to trade with Europe not the EU.

 

Source: Brexit could cause break-up of UK, says ex-Chancellor George Osborne | Daily Mail Online

Data on Covid care home deaths kept secret ‘to protect commercial interests’ | World news | The Guardian


Exclusive: English and Scottish regulators refuse to reveal homes with most fatalities

Source: Data on Covid care home deaths kept secret ‘to protect commercial interests’ | World news | The Guardian

Why Nicola Sturgeon’s apology over Scotland’s exams calamity isn’t enough : New Statesman


For the sake of her government’s credibility, Sturgeon must remove John Swinney as Scottish Education Secretary.

Source: Why Nicola Sturgeon’s apology over Scotland’s exams calamity isn’t enough : New Statesman

Scotland coronavirus death rate third worst in the world | The Scotsman


Scotland’s coronavirus death toll has hit 4,000 it was revealed yesterday, as the Scottish Government faced criticism over failing to meet a pledge to introduce routine testing of care home workers.

Source: Scotland coronavirus death rate third worst in the world | The Scotsman

‘Destroyed’ dunes on Donald Trump’s Aberdeenshire golf course to lose special status : The Telegraph


The sand dunes at Donald Trump’s golf resort in the north of Scotland are set to lose their protected status after experts accused the US President’s seaside course of “destroying” the habitat.

The Scottish Government agency Scottish Natural Heritage has recommended that the area should lose its status as a nationally important site of special scientific interest (SSSI).

It said there was no longer any reason to protect the dunes at Menie, north of Aberdeen, as they did not include enough special features to warrant designation.

SNH said evidence showed permanent habitat loss following the construction of fairways and greens, and that the stabilisation of mobile sand dunes had “destroyed the dynamic nature of the site”.

 

Source: ‘Destroyed’ dunes on Donald Trump’s Aberdeenshire golf course to lose special status : The Telegraph

The France v Britain scallop war goes much deeper than Brexit with nets | John Lichfield | Opinion | The Guardian


Forty French fishing boats attack five British boats in the Channel. Stones and smoke bombs are thrown. Rude words are exchanged in two languages. The British retreat.

Similar incidents have been happening for 15 years – or arguably for the last 900 years. The rights and wrong are complicated. Yesterday evening the French boats were undoubtedly the aggressors. They put to sea not in order to fish, but to harass the English and Scottish boats that had entered “their waters”.

It was foolhardy of the French fishermen, but they do have reasons to be exasperated. The latest outbreak of the Baie de la Seine scallop war should be seen in the context of Brexit and the deep uncertainties and exaggerated expectations encouraged by simplistic and vague UK plans to reclaim “our seas” and “our fish”.

Ironies abound. In the this dispute, British boats are asserting their right to fish in French waters even when they are closed to French trawlers. This right depends on EU rules, but pre-dates the EU fishing policy.

In any case, the row is not just about France v Britain. It is also about Big Boats v Small Boats, and the ecological damage caused by modern methods of industrial-scale fishing.

First, some facts. The clashes took place in “French waters” – that is to say about 15 miles from the French coast at a point where the Channel is about 100 miles wide, well beyond any possible legal definition of British waters. There were 40 French boats and five British – but the French boats were tiny and the British boats were large.

Source: The France v Britain scallop war goes much deeper than Brexit with nets | John Lichfield | Opinion | The Guardian

Donald Trump’s golf resort wrecked special nature site, reports reveal | US news | The Guardian


The spectacular dunes system picked by Donald Trump for his golf resort in Aberdeenshire has been “partially destroyed” as a result of the course’s construction, documents released under the Freedom of Information Act have revealed.

Scottish Natural Heritage, which has been under pressure for years to speak out on the issue, now acknowledges that serious damage has been done to the site of special scientific interest (SSSI) at Foveran Links on the Menie estate, north of Aberdeen, since the course opened in 2012, the documents show.

As a result, Foveran’s SSSI status – given because of its unusual shifting sands and diverse plant life – now hangs in the balance.

“Construction of the new golf course involved earthworks, planting of trees, greens and fairways, drainage, irrigation and grass planting,” states one of the reports released by Scottish Natural Heritage inspectors. “This has affected the natural morphology of the dunes and interfered with natural processes. Most of its important geomorphological features have been lost or reduced to fragments. Nearby marine terraces have also been reduced to fragments.”

“These documents show that considerable damage has been done to Foveran Links, and that it is very unlikely that it will retain its SSSI status,” said Bob Ward, the policy director at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, who obtained the reports under FoI. Ward has also asked the Scottish government to investigate whether proper environmental monitoring has been carried out at the site since 2012.

 

Source: Donald Trump’s golf resort wrecked special nature site, reports reveal | US news | The Guardian

Scottish politicians are celebrating after a European government is ‘humiliated’ into action | The Canary


Scottish politicians and campaigners are celebrating after the Spanish government was forced to withdraw arrest warrants for several Catalan politicians. These included the warrant seeking the extradition of Clara Ponsati, who was set to appear in court in Edinburgh on 23 July.

The Spanish judiciary made the decision after German courts ruled against extraditing former Catalan president Carlos Puigdemont on charges of rebellion.

European Arrest Warrants

The Catalan independence referendum took place on 1 October 2017.  Spain declared the vote illegal, and the scenes of police violence that followed caused outrage across the world.

Spain has since continued to crack down on key figures within the movement. It also issued European arrest warrants for those who fled Catalonia after the vote. The charges listed included rebellion and misuse of public funds.

Ponsati left Catalonia after the vote to St Andrews in Fife, Scotland. Ponsati had previously worked as a lecturer at the town’s university and returned to her role in 2018.

Scottish human rights lawyer Aamer Anwar, who represents Ponsati, said they were still awaiting officialconfirmation from Spain that the warrants had been dropped.

 

Source: Scottish politicians are celebrating after a European government is ‘humiliated’ into action | The Canary