Safeguarding people in faith communities | SCIE


Churches and faith-based groups play a vital role in the lives of many children, young people and adults. People who contribute to the life of faith-based communities and places of worship have a role to play in keeping people safe. They also play a vital role in responding effectively and compassionately when someone comes forward to share concerns or disclose abuse.

SCIE is working with a number of faith groups to enable them to improve their safeguarding practice. This is a summary of the SCIE Inter faith breakfast that brought together senior UK faith leaders to talk about safeguarding adults and children.

Whilst abuse in faith-based communities remains relatively rare, we have seen from recent high-profile inquiries the immense and long-lasting damage caused when abuse is perpetrated by someone in a faith-related role. We have also seen how ineffective, unprofessional or defensive responses are experienced by victims as re-abusive, sometimes worse than the original abuse itself.

The SCIE breakfast brought together senior faith leaders from across the country to identify what is helping and what is hindering safeguarding work, lessons learnt on individual journeys of improvement, and what more is needed to be done to remove the barriers to delivering the highest quality safeguarding to keep all children and adults safe.

Safeguarding is everyone’s business. For faith-based organisations and communities, getting this right can be challenging but it must be at the heart of everything they do. Recognising the risks and understanding that abusers can hide in plain sight is more than a tick-box exercise, it’s about culture and behaviour.

Paul Burstow, Chair, SCIE

The SCIE Inter‑faith breakfast was the first of a series of reflective learning events to create a platform for dialogue and share best practice in safeguarding. There were representatives from the Methodist Church, the Church in Wales, the United Reformed Church, the Catholic Safeguarding Advisory Service, Soka Gakkai International UK – Buddhism in Action for Peace, the Church of England, Quakers in Britain, Baptists Together, and the Jewish community (Reshet).

Participants on the day agreed:

  • How much they shared in terms of the challenges they all faced in progressing safeguarding practice, despite the differences between faith groups
  • How useful it was to discuss these challenges with people of faith, regardless of which faith

Setting the scene – key note speakers

 

Source: Safeguarding people in faith communities | SCIE

Named social worker pilot boosts skills, knowledge and confidence, says report | Community Care


Practitioners taking part in the Named Social Worker (NSW) pilot scheme were “more motivated” and recorded greater job satisfaction which led to “good social work”, a report has found.

Commissioned by the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) in 2016 to understand how a named social worker could help to improve outcomes for individuals with learning disabilities, autism and mental health conditions, the Putting people at the heart of social work: lessons from the named social worker programme report found NSWs were more confident in their ability to “meaningfully engage with service users” and deliver person-centred plans.

Meanwhile, service users and their families acknowledged the benefits of the project, stating contact with a NSW gave them a greater voice in arranging person-centred plans.

Positive response

The Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) and the Innovation Unit – responsible for producing the report – worked with the six phase 2 sites (Calderdale, Camden, Hertfordshire, Liverpool, Nottingham and Sheffield) to assess the impact of the pilot on service users, named social workers and the wider system.

 

Source: Named social worker pilot boosts skills, knowledge and confidence, says report | Community Care

No confidence that SCIE report will see Care Act turnaround in Norfolk | DisabledGo News and Blog


A report commissioned following concerns raised by disabled people that their local authority was breaching its duties under the Care Act will do little to help because it fails to address drastic cuts to social care funding, say campaigners. Norfolk County Council (NCC) had asked the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) to review its implementation of the 2014 Care Act after the disabled people’s organisation Equal Lives accused it of “reckless behaviour” that had left disabled people prisoners in their own homes. Equal Lives had accused the Conservative-majority council of a “systemic failure” to meet its legal duties under the act. But although the report by SCIE – an improvement support agency that was originally set up by the Labour government but later became a charity – makes 22 recommendations for improvements at the council, it says nothing about the need for greater funding for social care in Norfolk. SCIE said that the issue of funding and resources was “not

Source: No confidence that SCIE report will see Care Act turnaround in Norfolk | DisabledGo News and Blog

Recognition and support must go hand in hand for unpaid carers | Social care


It’s with pleasure we feature the latest guest blog from Tony Hunter, Chief Executive of the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE). As part of our call for evidence coverage, he explains why i

Source: Recognition and support must go hand in hand for unpaid carers | Social care

Social care cases to be audited after user-group claims council breached Care Act | Community Care


Social care cases at Norfolk Council will be audited after a user-group reported the council for ‘disregarding’ its duties under the Care Act

Source: Social care cases to be audited after user-group claims council breached Care Act | Community Care

Everyone should have friends and support – social care has a role in tackling isolation | Social care


Too many people are lonely. And isolation is very bad for our health and wellbeing. That’s according to experts and academics. With the recent John Lewis ‘man on the moon’ advert, we have also see

Source: Everyone should have friends and support – social care has a role in tackling isolation | Social care

Proof of what works is essential to improving later life


Original post from The Guardian

‘…………By Catherine Foot  director of evidence at the Centre for Ageing Better

Solutions that transcend traditional boundaries could be key to providing the most effective services for the money available

If we are to achieve excellent care for everyone in later life, then creating, understanding and applying evidence needs to become routine. Photograph: Jens Kalaene/dpa/Corbis
If we are to achieve excellent care for everyone in later life, then creating, understanding and applying evidence needs to become routine. Photograph: Jens Kalaene/dpa/Corbis

What do you think is most needed to improve the quality of later life in this country?

You might say money – to reverse the chronic under-resourcing of publicly funded social care, for instance, or to invest much more widely in the housing adaptations that we know can help older people to remain independent.

You might say leadership – a form that brings together planning, housing, care and health, and the private, statutory and voluntary sectors, to work meaningfully together, sharing goals and delivering services that meet people’s needs and priorities in later life.

You might say we need to focus on attitudes and empowerment – to build a society that fully values and includes older people, families and carers and creates services for them that are designed with them.

Or you might say that we need to help more people in mid-life get skills and information to think about and prepare for their financial, social, housing and care needs in the future.

At the Centre for Ageing Better we believe we urgently need better information and evidence about what actually works to improve our later lives.

As with many areas in social policy, high-quality evaluations remain too few. We know much more about the nature of the problems than we do about the essential, transferable and sustainable ingredients of the solutions. We also particularly lack extensive evidence for interventions that cross traditional sector boundaries – that combine elements of social care and mental health interventions, say, or housing.

We need this evidence for a number of reasons. Fuelled by the pressure of continued public services spending cuts, we need more than ever to understand how we can deliver the most effective services for the money available. Services must have increasingly robust proof of their impact or else risk losing their funding. We also need evidence because it is through the cycle of innovating, learning and improving that we can achieve excellent services. And we need evidence because services should be transparent and accountable, clearly able to say what they do, why it works and what impact it has.

Good evidence comes in all shapes and sizes. Randomised controlled trials are unlikely to be realistic or feasible in much of social care practice, but proportionate, insightful and above all useful evidence can be generated at much lower cost. The insights that good evidence can bring should not be a line-by-line manual for exactly how every provider must work for every person, without a role for professional judgment and personalisation. Nor should the insights be so inextricable from the context in which they have been generated as to be dismissed as unworkable anywhere else. Good evidence shows what outcomes can be achieved, for which people, how, and at what cost.

Social care is of course far from an evidence-free zone. There is an active and growing research community; the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence is developing evidence-based social care guidelines, and organisations like the Social Care Institute for Excellence do important work to promote an evidence-based approach and encourage providers to foster work cultures that value reflection, learning and innovation.

But if we are to achieve excellent care for everyone in later life, then creating, understanding and applying evidence needs to become routine.   ……..’