Age UK statistics are alarming and shame the country | Care Industry News


New Age UK analysis finds that in the last 12 months, about 700,000 requests for formal care and support, equivalent to 51% of all applications, have been made by older people and yet have resulted in them not receiving formal care services. This is equivalent to 2,000 claims from older people being unsuccessful each day, or 80 every hour.[1]

In some of these cases, the older person was found by their council not to meet the eligibility criteria set for the social care system, and that was the end of it (23% of all requests for help); while in others the older person was found ineligible, but their council then referred them onto other services in the hope that they could assist, including their local Age UK (46% of all requests for help). [1]

 

Source: Age UK statistics are alarming and shame the country | Care Industry News

Funding alone won’t fix the social care system | Colin Capper | Social Care Network | The Guardian


Alzheimer’s Society is investing in three new research centres of excellence that aim to find ways to improve quality of life and care

Source: Funding alone won’t fix the social care system | Colin Capper | Social Care Network | The Guardian

Social care system ‘beginning to collapse’ as 900 carers quit every day | DisabledGo News and Blog


More than 900 adult social care workers a day quit their job in England last year, new figures reveal. Service providers warn that growing staff shortages mean vulnerable people are receiving poorer levels of care. In a letter to the prime minister, the chairman of the UK Homecare Association said the adult social care system – which applies to those over the age of 18 – has begun to collapse. The government said an extra £2bn is being invested in the system. An ageing population means demand is increasing for adult social care services. Those who provide care to people directly in their own homes, or in nursing homes, say a growing shortage of staff means people face receiving deteriorating levels of care. “You just can’t provide a consistent level of care if you have to keep recruiting new people”, said Sue Gregory, who has been a care home nurse in North Yorkshire for 13 years. “Its very simple, not many people want to do this kind of work, and this is a profession that relies on

Source: Social care system ‘beginning to collapse’ as 900 carers quit every day | DisabledGo News and Blog

The social care system is failing too many | DisabledGo News and Blog


Although Frances Ryan is correct regarding the systematic erasure of adults with disabilities (Social care is not just about the elderly, 10 February), she misses the point as to the legal intention of David Mowat’s statement. The last group of disabled people in plain sight but relegated to non-existence except during Red Nose Day are of course disabled children and their carers, usually parents and family. Parents have a statutory duty of care towards their children, which adults do not have towards other adults, hence the government’s need to make it more palatable for adults to care for their elderly relatives. There is the perception that parent carers of disabled children, and their children, get the lion’s share of the care system. This is untrue. In fact, the opposite is true. It is disabled children who have lost out completely to adult care, with families and children being abandoned by the state, and indeed wider society, who view disabled people – adults and children –

Source: The social care system is failing too many | DisabledGo News and Blog

Research will examine the ‘untold stories’ of LGBT service-users | DisabledGo News and Blog


By Raya Al Jadir New research will investigate the “untold stories” of disabled lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people in the social care system. The study will explore the experiences of LGBT disabled men and women who use direct payments or personal budgets to fund their social care. It has been launched by the disabled LGBT organisation Regard, the gay rights charity Stonewall, the Norah Fry Research Centre at the University of Bristol and the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE). Dr Ju Gosling, co-chair of Regard, said: “We know almost nothing about the use and experiences of using social care support by LGBT disabled men and women, because to date no-one has asked. “This is despite the fact that as many as one in three LGBT people are disabled. “We are also disproportionately represented among social care-users, because we are less likely to live in the area we grew up, and less likely to have children and family members to support us, than other disabled

Source: Research will examine the ‘untold stories’ of LGBT service-users | DisabledGo News and Blog

Value my care


Original post from Carers UK

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Value my care

We have found that the value of the contribution made by carers in the UK is now £132 billion each year – that’s a fifth of UK Government spending.

We want Government to recognise the contribution made by carers, including the value of the care they provide to the UK economy, and provide the necessary support that carers need to be able to care effectively.

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Join our campaign »

Send a clear message: value my care.

The more support we have, from carers raising this with their MP and the Chancellor, the stronger our voice will be. We are calling on Government, ahead of the Spending Review on 25 November 2015, to:

  • Urgently address the chronic underfunding of the social care system
  • Improve financial support for carers
  • Promote a carer-friendly NHS
  • Introduce a right to paid care leave
  • Stimulate a diverse care market to give carers better choice and flexibility

Already joined the campaign?

 

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Make sure that George Osborne values your care.

Contact the Chancellor »

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Find out more about our report, Valuing Carers 2015.

Find out more »

 

 

 

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