Archives for posts with tag: social care

Commenting on the Conservative party manifesto proposals on social care, published last week, LaingBuisson founder and healthcare economist William Laing said:

“A ‘manifesto mouse’ looks to be a fair description of the Conservative party proposals on social care funding published last week.

They amount to half of Dilnot (the £100,000 capital threshold) but not the other half (the lifetime cap on care costs), and it is to be partly financed by making homecare subject to a capital means test, which commentators have been at pains to point out for the first time includes the value of owner occupiers’ homes.

Extension of deferred payments to all will make it more palatable, but

Source: Conservative manifesto fails to address the real cost of long term care funding | Care Industry News


Overdue recognition – but the proposals come with limitations

Source: Leave to care: a first step to a fair system? | New Economics Foundation

WHAT ARE THE SOLUTIONS TO BRITAIN’S SOCIAL CARE CRISIS?

Forward, not Back

SOCIAL CARE, INFLATION AND HOUSING: THIS MORNING’S PAPER REVIEW


Age UK calls on all political parties to put social care at the heart of their manifestos as new figures reveal high numbers of over-80s going without the help

Source: Nearly 1 in 3 elderly people struggling with essential tasks of living, amidst breakdown in social care | Care Industry News


Katie Mantell argues we need to do more to raise understanding of what social care is and how it’s provided and funded.

Source: Social care: what’s in a name? | The King’s Fund

Who provides social care?


The House of Lords Select Committee on the Long-term Sustainability of the NHS has slammed the ‘short-sightedness’ of successive governments for failing to plan effectively for the long-term future of the health service and adult social care.

 

Source: Continuous lack of planning in social care puts NHS sustainability in jeopardy | Care Industry News


I agree with your comments, however £2bn is a drop in the ocean compared to the amounts the Government have starved Local Authorities from due to the dreaded austerity cuts.

If MPs and Ministers were doing care work then there would be no problem in providing large salary increases or any other increases as austerity is not part of them. However, none of them would be capable of doing such work as you need to have common sense and be a caring person and not just look after number one.

Poppy's Place

I think I’m supposed to be grateful.

I think all of us disabled, and older people are supposed to say ‘Thank you’ to the Chancellor, Philip Hammond, for his much flaunted, much hyped boost of £2bn for Social Care in yesterday’s Spring Budget.

Well then.

Here goes…

Thank you Mr Hammond, you are so beneficent and generous.

Sure, £2bn is an awful lot of money, and, with any luck it, at least some of should help ease the Care Crisis we currently have in this country, but it can only help if it actually filters down to the people it’s supposed to be helping. My major concern is that it will be shared out amongst all the Social Services Departments, nationwide, and will just vanish into their usual, annual Social Care black hole. We, the older and disabled people who are the ones who are supposed to reap the benefit…

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It seems we are running out of ways to convey to the government the level of crisis that now exists in social care.

The care system has been described as “at a tipping point”, in “a deeper existential crisis”, part of a “humanitarian crisis” and, more recently, “on its knees”. Health and care leaders have pleaded with government ministers to put extra funding into social care, with some even seeing it as the priority ahead of extra funding for the NHS. Local government leaders point to a funding gap of £2.6bn by 2020 and rightly say that funding the growing needs of an ageing population cannot be left to the council taxpayer alone.

Councils prepare to cut essential services to fund adult social care,Read more Council leaders also remind us that the social care crisis is not just about older people. There are many other groups needing social care, including people with learning disabilities. People may be surprised to learn that about a third of councils’ annual social care spending, approximately £5bn, goes on supporting adults with learning disabilities.

The crisis in social care is caused by insufficient funding in the face of growing need. Cuts to council budgets have led to losses to adult social care budgets estimated by the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services to be £5.5bn by the end of this financial year. Many councils have had to deal with cuts to their budgets of 40% or more since 2010. They have also faced additional costs from the Care Act passed in 2014, the introduction of the national living wage for the care sector and continued rising demand for care.

The Kings Fund has recently said that adult social care is “rapidly becoming little more than a threadbare safety net for the poorest and most needy older and disabled people”. As we approach the budget and with talk of some additional funding for social care, it is time to ask ourselves if we accept this.

Source: Social care is on its knees. We all have a stake in its future | Barbara Keeley | Opinion | The Guardian


In a Conservative Britain, the catchphrase is “Everyone for themselves” – so we should all understand perfectly well why they couldn’t give a flying fig for social care. The…

Source: Social? Care? Those are words the Tories hate – of course they have abdicated responsibility for it | Vox Political


Your posting states how it should be and I welcome your post in that it may enlighten others, a welcome read, thank you

PROMOTING POSITIVE PARTNERSHIP WORKING

A little bit about myself first.  I am a 40 something mum, student and big fan of coffee.  I also work for a national learning disability charity as a support worker, and have  worked within health and social care for the past 7 years. I continually juggle all 3 of aspects, as I’m certain many other working student parents do. The aim of this blog is to add an individual and personal touch to one of the “partnership” units for the HNC Health and Social Care level 4 course I am studying, and of course to allow me to present my knowledge in a different way, rather than just on paper.  Whilst not completely informal, this blog will be less academic than a written essay as a way of appealing to readers.

Promoting Positive Partnership Working

The term “Partnership” is somewhat of a buzz word within the remit of health and social care currently.  This…

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What are the opportunities and challenges in implementing sustainability and transformation plans?

Source: Seven big questions facing STPs | The King’s Fund

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