“I had to go to a tribunal to get what I needed”


As it has been stated before that this whole processed is geared to produced as much stress as possible and in many instances, if not all, the assessors and the system is not open to reason.

Unlike our legal system, where you are presumed innocent until proved guilty, the benefit system appears to make everyone guilty until found innocent.

As though the conditions people have are not enough to cause concern and stress, this benefit system only adds to it, thus making people feel even worse.

If people are already distress and/or stressed, this additional stress could make a person worse, which could result to create a situation where they are in a state where they have no hope, which is a state where persons could take their own lives. Creating situations which is the final straw, until you have been there, you will not appreciate those feeling of extreme despair.

Has the system been designed to create this? It certainly makes you wonder, a case of permanently removing people from the benefit system.

Would this Government really do this!

sdbast

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Disabled people forced to go through two disability benefit assessments : Welfare Weekly


The Benefits and Work website have reported that a number of their members in recent weeks have been been made to go through a second Personal Independent Payment (PIP) assessment before a decision is made on their award, because there was a problem with the first assessment report.

One member faced a two hour assessment on Christmas Eve. In January they were contacted by Capita and told that the assessment was “incomplete” and that someone was to be “sent round to finish it.”

Capita have refused to say what information was missing and would not provide a copy of the report until it was complete.

 

Source: Disabled people forced to go through two disability benefit assessments : Welfare Weekly

Social worker distress ‘not taken seriously enough by employers’ | Community Care


Social work employers and educators must do more to ensure practitioners are supported in handling emotional distress, according to sector leaders.

Speaking at Community Care Live on the issue last week, Paul Angeli, assistant director of children’s social care and youth inclusion at the London Borough of Merton, said emotional distress was at the core of all social work, but employers and managers did not take it seriously enough.

“Distress is the stuff of social work and if it’s not then I don’t know what is, because when you hear a distressed child or a vulnerable adult, if you’re not hearing that distress than as a social worker what is your job? What are you doing? Your job is to help them manage their distress. In order to do that social workers internalise that distress so they can help that person make sense of it. So I would say the management of emotional distress is at the core of social work practice.”

He said senior managers often switched off from it as part of an organisational defensiveness because they weren’t sure what else to do. Instead they should be ensuring they were noticing social workers in distress and the organisation was equipped and able to help them manage it.

Physical impact

He added that emotional distress did not just have a mental impact on workers but there was often a physical impact as well from adrenalin, anxiety and feeling tense.

“If that social worker ends up carrying that distress around with them for days, weeks, even months then surprise, surprise they’re probably going to start looking for another job or even look to leave the profession.”

 

Source: Social worker distress ‘not taken seriously enough by employers’ | Community Care

Over a third don’t appeal PIP due to the stress


The whole process is deliberately made to be stressful to lead claimants to not appeal and so complicated so that some claimants will not fully understand the system of claiming.

Those claimants, being a minority, who are committed to defrauding the system will know it inside out as they, more likely than not, will be successful in their claims.

So the complicatedness of the system is there to thwart the genuine claimants, a complete reversal of what is said it is there for.

21 year old with brain tumours declared ‘Fit for Work’ by Department of Work & Pensions | Nye Bevan News


Mum Rita Curtis, 47, said Philip’s tumours were first diagnosed when he was 11 years old and since had three removed and two vents put in his head.

“He was getting these headaches and he had to be taken home from school and would go to bed. He would be vomiting.

He’s had a lot of surgery. As well as the initial biopsy, he’s had three tumours removed and two vents in his head. There’s been five operations over the last couple of years.

FROM LAST JULY WHEN DWP STOPPED HIS MONEY I’VE HAD TO SUPPORT HIM ON MY PART-TIME NIGHT WORKER’S PAY.

I’m paying my mortgage, utilities, and looking after his needs as a carer and I’m on my own.

It’s very stressful because in between working and caring for Philip I’ve got to help him with all the paperwork.

 

Source: 21 year old with brain tumours declared ‘Fit for Work’ by Department of Work & Pensions | Nye Bevan News

Disability assessors asked: ‘how long will you have Parkinson’s for?’ – The i newspaper online iNews


Just what planet are these assessors on, even though they may not, initially, understand the conditions people have, they will have had sight of the persons application for PIP and therefore they should have looked up the relevant information before interviewing the claimant.

The assessors, I believe come from different branches of the medical profession and if this is the extent of their knowledge, how can they hope to proceed with their professional career.

Or is it that they could not careless for the claimants they are assessing as long as they get paid for assessing them.

Each of the assessors and their employers should be accountable for the decisions they make and if they make wrong decisions then that part of their received payment should be returned.

Only in this way will correct decisions be made, or is the correct decision, every time, irrespective of what is included in the claimants application, to decline the benefit requests.

This is not a way of saving money as every incorrect assessment costs much more by going through the appeals process, the whole system is ‘not fit for purpose’.

But unfortunately the systems throughout the benefits procedures and also those administered by Local Government Authorities are their to hinder, create stress and be a general provision to create untold harm to the people accessing the various authorities and respective departments.

Are these systems there to create situations where people cannot survive thereby reducing the market as death will be the ultimate conclusion and thereby make the savings that are obviously the prime objective.

Tory Britain!

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Sanctioned for not being able to sign on on bank holiday Monday. Tears, frustration and rain.


The poor side of life

Today’s demo started rather hurriedly and to be honest I didn’t know if I was coming or going. This feeling was amplified because it was cold, rainy and my daughter was a bit fed up. understandable of course. But she soon settled down into our usual routine and all was well.

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We are seeing a lot of new faces due to Stalybridge Jobcentre shutting. They don’t know us and what we are doing, and we don’t know them or their situations either. So we have to start from scratch, which at times isn’t easy.  But it’s a whole lot harder for them.

I started a conversation with a man who had been previously attending Stalybridge Jobcentre for his appointments. The first thing that he said to me was that he couldn’t believe how rude the front desk staff are at  Ashton Jobcentre, and how rude some of the advisors are also…

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The surprising science of fidgeting


Hand-held toys known as “fidget spinners” – marketed as “stress relievers” – have become so popular and distracting in classrooms that they are now being banned in many schools. And it’s not just kids who like to fidget. Look around your office and you will probably see people bouncing their legs up and down, turning pens over and over in their hands, chewing on things, sucking on their lower lips and pulling bits of their beard out – seemingly completely unconsciously.

But why do we fidget, and why do some people do it more than others? And if it really helps to relieve stress, does that mean we should all embrace it?

These are actually rather difficult questions to answer, as there appear to be various definitions of what fidgeting is and why it happens. However, there are some interesting, if unexpected, theories.

Regulating attention

Cognitive research suggests that fidgeting is associated with how stimulated we are. That is, fidgeting may be a self-regulation mechanism to help us boost or lower our attention levels depending on what is required – either calming or energising us.

People who fidget a lot are generally more prone to mind wandering and daydreaming. We also often tend to fidget while our mind is wandering during a task. If your mind wanders, you are likely to perform more poorly on whatever task you are doing. Similarly, you typically perform worse while you are in the process of fidgeting – this has been shown to affect memory and comprehension.

Source: The surprising science of fidgeting

My Aspergers Child: Raising a Child on the Autism Spectrum: The Impact on the Family


A diagnosis of Asperger’s (AS) or High-Functioning (HFA) not only changes the life of the youngster diagnosed, but also that of parents and siblings. Many moms and dads of an AS or HFA youngster must deal with a significant amount of stress related to expensive therapies and treatments, therapy schedules, home treatments, managing job responsibilities, and juggling family commitments.

While some children on the spectrum and their families cope well with the additional challenges that autism brings, for many others, the impact can be overwhelming.  Children with AS and HFA face many issues (e.g., the persistent challenge of trying to “fit-in” with their peer group, frustration at not being able to express how they feel, daily anxiety because they can’t make sense of what is happening around them, etc.). As a result, these kids often develop stress-reducing behaviors that can make them appear odd and/or defiant. Some moms and dads even avoid taking their “special needs” youngster out to public places rather than face the reactions from those who don’t understand the disorder. This may cause not only the autistic youngster, but the entire family to become housebound.

 

Source: My Aspergers Child: Raising a Child on the Autism Spectrum: The Impact on the Family